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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Vadym Pyrozhenko

This paper engaged in theory-building from social movement and knowledge management (KM) theories and applied the case study method to explore the role of knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper engaged in theory-building from social movement and knowledge management (KM) theories and applied the case study method to explore the role of knowledge complexity in administration–society collaborations on knowledge. Complex knowledge is a kind of knowledge that consists of many interdependent elements, some of which are tacit. Complex knowledge creates challenges when external social groups attempt to transfer their knowledge to public organizations. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the following question: how do social groups acting as knowledge agents transfer their knowledge if it is complex?

Design/methodology/approach

A single-case study methodology informs the theory-building in this paper. The paper examined a case of collaboration between the natural childbirthing social movement and state maternity hospitals in Russia and Ukraine. The case was constructed from interviews, primary sources and secondary sources.

Findings

Social movement and KM theories were used in a case analysis to formulate theoretical propositions about the complexity of social movement knowledge, why and how movements transfer their knowledge through collaborations with the state, and how administrators assess movement knowledge and its transfer. The case suggests that administrators’ lack of capacity to recognize and deal with complex knowledge results in the underutilization of social groups’ knowledge. In particular, administrators treat complex knowledge as simple, and they misunderstand and underestimate its effects on collaboration.

Originality/value

To the best of this author’s knowledge, this paper is the first attempt in public administration to engage in theory-building from social movement and KM theories.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Claudine Antoinette Soosay and Paul Hyland

This paper aims to conduct a systematic review of the literature on supply chain collaboration published over a 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It explores the nature…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conduct a systematic review of the literature on supply chain collaboration published over a 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It explores the nature and extent of research undertaken to identify key themes emerging in the field and gaps that need to be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review a sample of 207 articles from 69 journals, after using an iterative cycle of defining appropriate search keywords, searching the literature and conducting the analysis.

Findings

Key themes include the meaning of collaboration; considerations for supply chain collaboration theory; emerging areas in collaboration for sustainability, technology-enabled supply chains and humanitarian supply chains; and the need for a more holistic approach, multi-tier perspectives and research into B2C collaborations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides discussion and scope for future research into the area which would contribute to the field tremendously.

Originality/value

There have been very few reviews in the past on supply chain collaboration, and this is one of the first extensive reviews conducted to address how well the body of knowledge on supply chain collaboration corresponds with our contemporary society.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Ned Kock, Robert Davison, Raul Wazlawick and Rosalie Ocker

The guest‐editors of the first Special Issue on E‐Collaboration provide an introduction to the issue. E‐collaboration is broadly defined as collaboration among individuals…

Abstract

The guest‐editors of the first Special Issue on E‐Collaboration provide an introduction to the issue. E‐collaboration is broadly defined as collaboration among individuals engaged in a common task using electronic technologies. A brief history of the evolution of e‐collaboration technologies is offered along with a discussion of research in the area. The paper concludes with a brief review of the contributions to the Special Issue and a look at one important future challenge for e‐collaboration researchers, the challenge of theoretical summarization.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Maryam Lotfi, Maneesh Kumar, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues, Mohamed Naim and Irina Harris

This study aims to explore how horizontal collaboration can help small and micro enterprises within the drink sector through the relational theory lens.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how horizontal collaboration can help small and micro enterprises within the drink sector through the relational theory lens.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of qualitative research methods, including focus groups and interviews, facilitated understanding the horizontal collaboration in micro and small companies within the Welsh brewery industry. Data collection involved conducting three focus groups and 13 interviews within the Welsh brewery sector in the UK. The collaboration phenomena were explained using the three elements of relational theory: relational rents, relational capitals and relational governance.

Findings

Micro and small enterprises in the drink sector use collaborative initiatives in building new capabilities to generate relational rents. In addition, relational capitals and relational governance mechanisms were identified to support the horizontal collaboration among these enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

The focus is on only one part of the drinks industry, i.e. the brewery industry; therefore, this study could be extended to other industries within the drink sector or across manufacturing industries.

Practical implications

The micro and small enterprises can collaborate to achieve relational rent, but this collaboration requires strong relational capitals, such as trust. These partners need to change informal governance mechanisms that already exist towards more contractual formal mechanisms.

Originality/value

Prior research has largely focused on vertical collaboration, with limited studies using the relational theory lens to explicate horizontal collaboration phenomena and no previous research in the context of micro and small companies. Relational rents, relational capitals and relational governance mechanisms are studied to provide insights into an effective collaboration in this context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Terese Fiedler and Craig Deegan

This paper sets out to document a review of environmental collaborations in the Australian building and construction industry and to identify a number of motivations that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to document a review of environmental collaborations in the Australian building and construction industry and to identify a number of motivations that appear to drive particular environmental groups and building and construction companies to collaborate on specific projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involves a series of in‐depth interviews with individuals from building and construction companies and from environmental groups, and utilises a number of theoretical perspectives to explain the various perspectives being adopted by the interviewees.

Findings

The results indicate that corporate managers seek to collaborate with environmental groups as a result of pressures exerted by particular stakeholder groups, particularly government, and by the desire to be aligned with an organisation that has “green credentials” – something that is valuable in enhancing the reputation and legitimacy of the company and the related building project. There was also a related financial motivation for collaborating. The representatives from the environmental groups indicated that motivations for collaboration included developing a project that could be used as a vehicle for “educating” the public, generating positive environmental outcomes, complying with the expectations of their constituents, and setting an example for other building and construction companies to follow.

Originality/value

Little research has been done in the area of environmental collaborations. In this study, environmental collaborations were considered as a vehicle for both the environmental groups and the companies to further meet their organisational objectives and were generally considered as successful initiatives from each organisation's perspective.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Stanley E. Fawcett, Gregory M. Magnan and Amydee M. Fawcett

The purpose of this paper is to address how companies mitigate existing forces to achieve the collaboration enabled supply chain (SC).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address how companies mitigate existing forces to achieve the collaboration enabled supply chain (SC).

Design/methodology/approach

Seven key theories were used to provide insight into the theoretical framework for the creation of the collaboration‐enabled SC: contingency theory, the resource‐based view of the firm, the relational view of the firm, force field theory, constituency‐based theory, social dilemma theory, and resource‐advantage theory. An exploratory cross‐sectional survey was conducted at two different points in time – a six‐year period in between. The survey targeted three different functional areas – logistics, manufacturing, and sourcing – to compare and contrast functional perceptions of barriers and bridges to collaboration.

Findings

Companies are beginning to pursue greater collaboration, however, managers are often stymied in their pursuit of collaborative business models. The data suggest that the challenge is not the existence of a single barrier to collaboration, but one of accumulation. As the many resistors reinforce each other, the change needed to increase collaboration is avoided. To overcome these challenges, the findings suggest that a comprehensive and carefully executed collaboration strategy is needed to help a company profitably deliver high levels of customer satisfaction. Those companies that succeed achieve substantial, documentable benefits.

Practical implications

The findings reveal that developing a collaboration‐enabled business model is very difficult. Therefore, managers must carefully evaluate their companies' motivation and readiness to pursue a collaboration‐enabled SC, consider whether they can generate momentum for sustained change, and ascertain whether they can persist when benefits are slow to emerge.

Originality/value

This study is both longitudinal and cross‐functional and leads to a better understanding of how to manage, change, and create a collaborative decision‐making environment.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Abel Duarte Alonso and Alessandro Bressan

Collaboration among businesses, particularly in the current global economic downturn, can be a key strategy contributing to their survival. This study examines the case of…

Abstract

Purpose

Collaboration among businesses, particularly in the current global economic downturn, can be a key strategy contributing to their survival. This study examines the case of micro firms involved in Terracotta art in Impruneta, Italy, and the extent to which collaboration occurs among the local artisans. In doing so, the study aims to consider collaboration theory in the context of micro firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured, face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted among the owners and managers of ten of Impruneta's 16 Terracotta firms.

Findings

Whilst much of the academic literature highlights the multiple benefits of collaborative relationships, most participants acknowledge very limited engagement in collaboration. From the comments gathered, two distinct groups emerged, one composed of members of the local Terracotta association, who to some extent collaborate with one another, and the second, the non-members, who pursue their interests individually, or marginally collaborate outside Impruneta. Further, a number of barriers preventing collaboration were identified.

Practical implications

The apparent weak collaborative relationships among respondents may have ramifications for the further development of their sector, for instance, restricting innovation and marketing know-how, both of which could help address such external pressures as competition. The involvement of third parties, such as the local town hall or chambers of commerce, was suggested by several participants to help increase collaboration.

Originality/value

The study focuses on micro firms, a group that, despite its relevance for many countries' economies, has received limited attention from academic research, including with regard to collaboration and collaboration theory.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Melissa Intindola, Judith Weisinger and Claudia Gomez

Studies of multi-sector collaborations have increased in recent years. However, the topic is still complex and lacks synthesis. Toward that end, the purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies of multi-sector collaborations have increased in recent years. However, the topic is still complex and lacks synthesis. Toward that end, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how collaboration is addressed in the public administration and nonprofit sector journals, and applies well-established strategic decision-making theories to shed light on possible research directions that would provide rigor to the field of collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a literature review of the top nonprofit and public administration journals, believing these most likely to contain articles on the topic of multi-sector collaboration.

Findings

The authors identify a number of themes, including need for clarity, temporality, call to collaborate, funding, partnering issues and processes, benefits of collaboration across three different collaborative types.

Originality/value

The authors embed well-known strategic decision-making theories into the themes emergent from this review and offer suggestions as to how future researchers may test strategic decision-making processes within multi-sector collaborations.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2013

Huei‐ting Tsai

The aim of this paper is to review theories on the kinship‐based collaboration for Asian multinational enterprises (MNEs). Although cooperation issues have reached the top…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to review theories on the kinship‐based collaboration for Asian multinational enterprises (MNEs). Although cooperation issues have reached the top of the Asian MNE agenda, comprehensive empirical and theoretical studies in these areas have remained patchy. Motivated expressly by the sparseness of theory development, this study seeks to establish and examine the model of kinship‐based alliance for MNEs. Drawing on kinship‐based theory, this paper contends that cross‐border collaboration within the same region is increasingly important in driving MNEs from emerging economies to internationalisation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study attempts to focus on kinship‐based collaborations from emerging economies to internationalization in the context of high‐tech industries by reviewing relevant studies and presents research propositions.

Findings

The study proposes that the model of kinship‐based alliance can be affected by these factors: economic (partner contributions in term of scale‐link theories), geographic, cultural and social (which are broadly defined as kinship‐based factors) factors. Therefore, the model of kinship‐based alliance can be characterized as an evolutionary struggle between these factors to develop a form of cross‐border cooperation.

Originality/value

The model of kinship based alliance enriches the theoretical field of internationalisation strategies for MNEs from developing economies, and this model also provides knowledge of collaboration behaviour for managers of high‐tech firms to create appropriate synergy for each party of an alliance.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Promotion, Recruitment and Retention of Members in Nonprofit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-659-7

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