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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2020

Kelvin Leong, Anna Sung, David Au and Claire Blanchard

Microlearning has been considered as a promising topic in work-based learning. This paper aims to review the trends of microlearning in terms of related publications and Internet…

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Abstract

Purpose

Microlearning has been considered as a promising topic in work-based learning. This paper aims to review the trends of microlearning in terms of related publications and Internet searches. Hopefully, the findings can serve as a reference for the education sector, government, business and academia to promote, design and use microlearning.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, two sets of analysis were conducted. Firstly, the authors analysed the publication trend of microlearning. Second, the authors analysed the trend of Internet searches related to microlearning. More specifically, the authors analysed real-world data of 14 years obtained from Scopus and Google Trends for the purpose. These data include the first relevant publication found in the database.

Findings

In total, 476 relevant publications have been identified during 2006–2019. According to the findings from the analysis of the identified publications, microlearning is a relevantly new and emerging global topic involving authors, affiliations and funding sponsors from different countries. Moreover, many microlearning-related publications were conducted from perspectives of e-learning or mobile learning. Furthermore, the authors notice higher education was the most frequently mentioned education level in the identified publications. On the other hand, language learning (i.e. second language, vocabulary learning, etc.) had been mentioned more times in the titles and abstracts than other subject areas. Overall, the increasing trend of publications on “microlearning” (as a knowledge supply) is in line with the established increasing Internet searches of “microlearning” (as a practical demand) in recent years.

Practical implications

From the work-based learning perspective, microlearning has been considered as one of the key topics in talent development topics. Policymakers, educators, researchers and participators have the responsibility to explore how to promote, design and use microlearning to help people to learn in the right direction through valid knowledge with ethical consideration.

Originality/value

Although many works had been done on microlearning, there is a lack of comprehensive studies reviewing the trends of microlearning in terms of related publications and Internet searches. This study aims to fill this gap by analysing real-world data obtained from Scopus and Google Trends – these data include the first relevant publication found in the database. The authors believe this is the first time that a study has been conducted to comprehensively review the development trends of microlearning. Hopefully, this study can shed some light on related research.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Robert M. Randall

352

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Amal Ahmadi, Bernd Vogel and Claire Collins

We take an affect-based approach to theoretically introduce and explore the knowing-doing gap of leadership. We focus on the emotion of fear that managers may experience in the…

Abstract

Purpose

We take an affect-based approach to theoretically introduce and explore the knowing-doing gap of leadership. We focus on the emotion of fear that managers may experience in the workplace, and how it may influence the transfer of their leadership knowledge into leadership action.

Methodology/approach

We use Affective Events Theory as our underlying theoretical lens, drawing on emotional, cognitive, and behavioral mechanisms to explain the role of fear in the widening and bridging of the knowing-doing gap of leadership.

Findings

We theoretically explore the interplay between leader fear, the leadership contexts, and the knowing-doing gap of leadership. From this, we develop a multidimensional theoretical framework on the influence of leader fear on the knowing-doing gap of leadership.

We highlight how fear and the knowing-doing gap of leadership may be influenced by and potentially impact on individual managers and their leadership contexts.

Originality/value

Our initial theoretical framework provides a starting point for understanding fear and the knowing-doing gap of leadership. It has implications for future research to enhance our understanding of the topic, and contributes toward existing approaches on leadership development as well as emotions and leadership.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on Public Finance in the History of Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-699-5

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Catherine Evans and Claire Goodman

The second in a new series about mental health in old age, this article reviews policies and research evidence on services for people with dementia at the end of their lives, and…

Abstract

The second in a new series about mental health in old age, this article reviews policies and research evidence on services for people with dementia at the end of their lives, and looks at future commissioning priorities

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Harvey A. Hornstein

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Claire L. Wyneken

Authenticity is being real and true to oneself and outwardly expressing that truth. Authenticity is not a leadership style, but rather a practice that will empower you and others…

Abstract

Authenticity is being real and true to oneself and outwardly expressing that truth. Authenticity is not a leadership style, but rather a practice that will empower you and others each time you choose to reveal it. It is also not about bearing your soul or sharing every intimate part of yourself to those you lead. Rather, it is consistently demonstrating your concerns, enthusiasm, strengths, weaknesses, learning, and vision.

Choosing to be authentic as a leader will reward you with a deeper connection with those you lead and foster courage in them. Discovering your authenticity can be painful and sometimes awkward, but even those moments of pain and discomfort can be powerful model of healthy vulnerability for others. Authenticity and vulnerability are not generally rewarded and are often challenged in our society. Therefore, it is easy to slide back into staying hidden and stoic. True authenticity then is a daily, sometimes moment by moment, choice.

This chapter describes an experience of finding authentic expression as a leader and how challenges will test that authenticity. Values, vulnerability, and vision are described and presented as anchors for choosing authenticity as a daily practice.

Details

Women Courageous
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-423-4

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

This paper aims to examine four programmes that have won National Training Awards for Nando's Restaurants over the last two years.

6819

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine four programmes that have won National Training Awards for Nando's Restaurants over the last two years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on management coaching (which won an award in 2005), training new employees (2005), improving internal communications (2004) and the “buddy” system of training (2004).

Findings

The paper finds that the training has helped the company to retain a “family” feel and stay close to its values, despite rapid expansion from 40 restaurants, mostly in and around London, in 2001, to more than 100 restaurants throughout England today.

Practical implications

The paper indicates that an emphasis on training may go along with high staff morale, since the company has lower‐than‐average employee turnover for its sector, and was placed 33rd in the 2005 Sunday Times Top 100 Companies to Work For awards.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the value of training for all levels of employee – from newly hired restaurant workers to top management staff.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Jacqueline Leigh, Grant Cairncross and Matthew Lamont

Managing special events which utilise volunteer labour presents unique challenges due to the time-bound and infrequent nature of events, coupled with the non-traditional…

1216

Abstract

Purpose

Managing special events which utilise volunteer labour presents unique challenges due to the time-bound and infrequent nature of events, coupled with the non-traditional employment contractual basis associated with volunteers. Having committed, well-trained volunteers can sometimes be the difference between success and failure for an event. This paper explores factors shaping event managers' decision-making in relation to allocating organisational resources towards training for event volunteers.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising qualitative methods, a sample of senior event managers practicing within Australia were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews. Their attitudes towards, and factors shaping, their decision-making in relation to allocating organisational resources towards training for event volunteers were analysed and discussed through an interpretive lens.

Findings

Six intervening variables which shaped event managers' decisions to resource volunteer training were identified. These six variables both shaped and constrained event managers' decisions to resource and implement volunteer training.

Originality/value

The study highlights factors that need to be considered when considering attaining festival attendance satisfaction with volunteers’ service provision through training. This work also contributes to future discussions about the value of volunteer training to event success.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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