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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Thomas Turner and Christine Cross

The link between human resource practices and earnings for workers is a notable research lacuna and the purpose of this paper is to address this relationship using a matched data…

Abstract

Purpose

The link between human resource practices and earnings for workers is a notable research lacuna and the purpose of this paper is to address this relationship using a matched data set covering all employees and employers in the Irish private sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on the National Employment Survey (NES) (2008). The survey provides measures of individual characteristics such as union membership, collective bargaining coverage, sector, occupation, age, sex and educational attainment. It also provides data on individual employee earnings including overtime and shift allowances, together with weekly hours worked. The particular benefit of the NES is that it is a large-scale matched employer-employee survey.

Findings

The results indicate that extensive use of high-involvement practices measured in this study is positively associated with higher earnings for both lower and higher earning employees. The authors also find that for employees covered by a collective agreement, the positive effects of high-involvement work practices are complementary with a union earnings premium.

Research limitations/implications

Some caution is required in the interpretation of the results given the cross-sectional nature of the data. With cross-sectional data it is difficult to establish definitive causal and directional linkages between high-involvement measures and levels of earnings and earnings inequality.

Practical implications

For trade unions and their members, the results imply that the involvement practices as measured in this study are unlikely to substitute for the earnings premium associated with collective bargaining coverage. For human resource, increasing the earnings of low-paid employees may carry relatively marginal costs but the benefits maybe considerable in the form of employee engagement, increased effort levels and productivity gains.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on the outcomes of high-involvement practices for employees and firms by addressing their association with employee earnings particularly at the lower end of the wage hierarchy.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 December 2019

M. Eugenia Sánchez-Vidal, David Cegarra-Leiva and Christine Cross

Attention on the issue of individual level conflict between work and life roles remains a feature of studies on work-life balance. However, few studies have examined gender…

Abstract

Purpose

Attention on the issue of individual level conflict between work and life roles remains a feature of studies on work-life balance. However, few studies have examined gender differences in the work-to-life conflict (WLC) and the life-to-work conflict (LWC) over a given period in Spain. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a two-wave (2009–2014) sample of working employees with children from an industrial sector in Spain.

Findings

The 2009 results showed no gender differences in WLC; however, women experienced LWC significantly more than men. Conversely, the 2014 results showed more men suffered WLC and no gender differences were found for LWC.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation is that we do not know if the same respondents answered the questionnaires in both time periods. Second, we did not analyse the inter-role conflict experienced by childless or single employees. Finally, and as stated before, findings may not be generalisable to other countries or sectors of activities.

Social implications

Our findings are discussed in the context of the economic crisis, the labour market and family co-responsibility in Spanish society.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored gender differences on inter-role conflict at two time points, and helps to identify key findings in terms of co-responsibility. Furthermore, this research is conducted in Spain, which is under-researched in WLB terms. The paper also identifies two distinct constructs of the inter-role conflict.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Christine Cross, Margaret Linehan and Caroline Murphy

Much of the literature identifies the positive nature of role models in career progression. The purpose of this paper is to take the contrary perspective and explore whether…

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Abstract

Purpose

Much of the literature identifies the positive nature of role models in career progression. The purpose of this paper is to take the contrary perspective and explore whether role-modelling behaviour of senior female managers can be unintentionally interpreted as negative, with an associated negative impact on career progression decisions of female managers.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this issue the authors took a grounded theory approach and 30 in-depth interviews were conducted with female middle-level managers in a wide range of Irish organisations.

Findings

The results of the interviews illustrate that role-modelling behaviour has the potential to negatively, rather than positively affect female career progression choices.

Practical implications

The unintended consequences of role-modelling behaviour of senior female managers highlights both the concept of negative role-modelling behaviour and identifies its impact on female managerial career progression.

Originality/value

This paper offers new insights into the construction of the global role model by introducing two new elements – the realistic role model and the departed role model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Nuala F. Ryan, Michelle Hammond, Sarah MacCurtain and Christine Cross

The purpose of this paper is to advance our understanding of the role of risk in leader identity development for women by identifying processes women leaders employ to overcome…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance our understanding of the role of risk in leader identity development for women by identifying processes women leaders employ to overcome perceived risk.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-five women leaders in the Irish healthcare sector took part in an 18-month long identity-based leadership development program. Qualitative data from interviews, focus groups, critical incident diaries and individual exit surveys and observations were analyzed using the constant comparative method.

Findings

Four key processes are identified as women leaders work through risks associated with structural elements (perceiving and mitigating structural risk) and agency of the leader (accepting agentic risks and developing agency).

Research limitations/implications

Like many focused qualitative studies, generalizability to a larger population might be limited. The authors, therefore, recommend future research to consider these issues in other industries, levels and national contexts.

Practical implications

Organizational members should pay attention to structural factors that affect women's perceptions of risks in internalizing a leader identity such as perceptions of organizational support for development, role models, mentoring and behavioral norms. Programs should aim to increase individual agency through personal reflection and freedom to experiment.

Originality/value

This paper offers an original and nuanced perspective on the role of risk in the leader identity development process for women.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 January 2024

Shona Ryan and Christine Cross

It is predicted that micromanagement may become a growing workplace concern post-Covid-19, with managers grappling for control in the current hybrid/remote working environment…

Abstract

Purpose

It is predicted that micromanagement may become a growing workplace concern post-Covid-19, with managers grappling for control in the current hybrid/remote working environment. This will be happening at a time when millennials represent half of the working population. This study contributes to existing literature and provides an overall appreciation of the complexities of micromanagement and how it impacts millennials' followership styles.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was undertaken and a series of hypotheses were tested. The target sample for this research was the millennial cohort aged between 24 and 41. Data were analysed using SPSS.

Findings

This paper confirmed that “unfavourable followership styles” consisted of various negative followership reactions such as anxiety, demotivation, dissatisfaction, disengagement, reduction in support for managers, limited upward feedback, team conflict, reduced productivity and innovation due to fear of making mistakes ultimately facilitating a toxic workplace. Essentially, this research validated the notion that in order to create a sustainable organisation post-Covid-19, HR professionals must take proactive measures to mitigate this form of harmful leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Data weaknesses transpire where respondents have never interacted with a micromanager in reality. Therefore, perceived reactions to a hypothetical micromanager may differ from those respondents who were exposed to micromanagers.

Originality/value

A lack of research exists on the intersection of micromanagement and millennials' followership styles and as such this paper bridges that gap.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Christine Cross

‘Use by’ is replacing other worlds inthe labelling of certain perishablefoods, Christine Cross BEd, MSc, DipMan reports

Abstract

‘Use by’ is replacing other worlds in the labelling of certain perishable foods, Christine Cross BEd, MSc, Dip Man reports

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Donald R. Lehmann

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

Content available

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Thomas N. Garavan, John P. Wilson, Christine Cross, Ronan Carbery, Inga Sieben, Andries de Grip, Christer Strandberg, Claire Gubbins, Valerie Shanahan, Carole Hogan, Martin McCracken and Norma Heaton

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to…

8819

Abstract

Purpose

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call centres operate. Call centres operate as open systems and training, development and HRD practices are influenced by environmental, strategic, organisational and temporal conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a range of research methods, including in‐depth interviews with multiple stakeholders, documentary analysis and observation. The study was conducted over a two‐year period.

Findings

The results indicate that normative models of HRD are not particularly valuable and that training, development and HRD in call centres is emergent and highly complex.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first studies to investigate training and development and HRD practices and systems in European call centres.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Work, Workplaces and Disruptive Issues in HRM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-780-0

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