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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Mirjam Haus, Christine Adler, Maria Hagl, Markos Maragkos and Stefan Duschek

The purpose of this paper is to examine specific stressors and demands, perceived control, received support and stress management strategies of crisis managers (i.e. executives…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine specific stressors and demands, perceived control, received support and stress management strategies of crisis managers (i.e. executives and supervisors of organizations involved in disaster response) in the context of large-scale missions.

Design/methodology/approach

Totally, 31 semi-structured interviews with crisis managers were conducted in five European countries and analyzed with the qualitative text analysis method GABEK®.

Findings

The sample reported high demands and various sources of stress, including event-specific stressors as well as group specific, occupational stressors such as responsibility for decision making, justification of failures or dealing with press and media. While possibilities for control were perceived as limited during large-scale missions, organizational and peer support played an important role in mitigating mission-related stress. Effective stress management strategies were reported as crucial to ensure successful crisis management, and a need for more comprehensive stress management trainings was emphasized.

Originality/value

While stressors and coping strategies in first responders and emergency services personnel have been previously examined, corresponding research regarding the professional group of crisis management leaders remains scarce. Therefore, this study makes an important contribution by examining influential stressors within the work environment of crisis managers and by identifying starting points and requirements for stress management trainings and psychosocial support programs.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Paresh Wankhade and DeMond Shondell Miller

383

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Hakan Göcerler, Simon Medina, Michael Adler, Josef Brenner, Andreas Tadler, Michael Nagl and Christine Hohenadl

Dry eye syndrome is one of the most common reasons for eye-related discomfort which, without treatment, in some cases may even lead to corneal damage. Blinking, baseline and…

Abstract

Purpose

Dry eye syndrome is one of the most common reasons for eye-related discomfort which, without treatment, in some cases may even lead to corneal damage. Blinking, baseline and reflex lachrymation and drainage compromise the topical application of therapeutics demanding repeated, often hourly applications of common lubricants. In contrast, topically administered chitosan-N-acetylcysteine-based eye drops were reported to sustain on the ocular surface for more than 24 h. The thiolated biopolymer can interact with the corneal mucin layer thereby forming covalent disulphide bridges, which may contribute to extended residence times.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the tribological characteristics of four different lubricants including hyaluronic acid and chitosan-N-acetylcysteine containing commercially available eye drops were investigated. For this purpose, a representative test setup was developed, which mimics the contact between the cornea and the eyelid wiper. Gels with different elastic properties coated with a mucin layer were used as a substrate to mimic the corneal surface. Tests were conducted with a micro-tribometer, and friction values were recorded. Contact zones were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate wear and thiol bonding on the surface.

Findings

Results revealed the lowest average coefficient of friction values for chitosan-N-acetylcysteine-based eye drops and substrate dependence of the test setup.

Originality/value

In this study, the authors introduced an in vitro system to test different types of eye drops so that chemical interaction with the mucin layer can be observed. These interactions change the tribological performance significantly and must be considered to have results relevant to the actual application.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 73 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Christine Vallaster and Oliver Koll

Group decisions have taken a prominent part in strategic decision making but managerial research still lacks techniques to study these interpersonal processes comprehensively…

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Abstract

Group decisions have taken a prominent part in strategic decision making but managerial research still lacks techniques to study these interpersonal processes comprehensively. Assuming that efficient decision making depends on shared cognitive structures within groups, an approach to analyze these structures and the affective and communicative dimensions causing convergence/divergence of individual cognitions is introduced. Suitable methods to study these variables are discussed and applied in an actual strategic decision to be made by a management team. The method shows a high degree of realism and preciseness in analyzing strategic group decisions.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2016

Jessica Lipschultz

This study documents the role of relational trust in an afterschool organization and its influences on young people’s experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

This study documents the role of relational trust in an afterschool organization and its influences on young people’s experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a 10-month ethnographic study of one afterschool program that teaches teens how to make documentaries, I demonstrate that the confluence of blurred organizational goals; weak relational trust among staff; and funding pressures may have the unintended consequence of exploiting students for their work products and life stories.

Findings

The study finds that, while not all organizations function with student work at its center, many afterschool organizations are under increasing pressures to document student gains through tangible measures.

Practical implications

Implications from these findings reveal the need for developing strong relationships among staff members as well as establishing transparency in funding afterschool programs from within the organization and from foundations in order to provide quality programming for young people.

Originality/value

This study informs organizational theory, specifically in terms of measures of variation in relational trust within an organization and its influence on young people. This chapter includes student accounts of experiences with staff to enhance the significance of relational trust.

Details

Education and Youth Today
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-046-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2021

M. Diane Burton and Charles A. O’Reilly

In one of his most cited works, March (1991) observed that “The basic problem confronting an organization is to engage in sufficient exploitation to ensure its current viability…

Abstract

In one of his most cited works, March (1991) observed that “The basic problem confronting an organization is to engage in sufficient exploitation to ensure its current viability and, at the same time, devote enough energy to exploration to exploration to ensure its future viability” (p. 105). The need to simultaneously pursue exploration and exploitation is a cornerstone of organizational ambidexterity, with the embedded assumption that exploratory ventures require organic management systems and exploitative activities benefit from more mechanistic management systems. The authors argue that this assumption about system alignment is neither well-supported by empirical evidence nor well-grounded in March’s original ideas about exploration and exploitation. The authors review the existing empirical evidence on the management systems that support exploration and exploitation and reveal some of the empirical and conceptual challenges. The authors then share a quasi-experimental study of 49 project teams over an 18-month period where they investigated how components of the management system – formalization, specialization, hierarchy, and leadership – differentially affect project success for explore and exploit projects. The authors find that exploitation projects can succeed under either mechanistic or organic systems, but that exploratory project performance suffers under a mechanistic system. In addition, the authors also find that leadership is the most important determinant of project success or failure. The authors discuss the implications of these results for future studies of organizational ambidexterity and draw attention to some of the underdeveloped ideas in March’s original article that might further advance the field.

Details

Carnegie goes to California: Advancing and Celebrating the Work of James G. March
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-979-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2011

Shelley M. Griffin

Purpose – This chapter focuses on how teacher candidates engage in a process of body mapping to narratively inquire into how their daily informal and formal music experiences…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter focuses on how teacher candidates engage in a process of body mapping to narratively inquire into how their daily informal and formal music experiences inform elementary music teaching practices.

Methodology and findings – In a primary/junior music education course at Brock University, teacher candidates utilize a course assignment to create a visual narrative (body map), along with oral and written narratives that outline their music experiences. Through this narrative inquiry, teacher candidates become aware of how their personal lived experiences influence their perceptions about elementary music teaching. This chapter offers conceptualizations of five threads that emerged from the narratives: process of body mapping and musical experience, music everywhere, school influences, family, and fear.

Value – This inquiry deepens understandings of curriculum making possibilities in elementary music teacher education as teacher candidates begin to form their music teacher identity based on their lived experiences. Such visual, oral, and written narratives contribute to increased narrative understandings by demonstrating the power teacher candidates' personal music experiences have in shaping teacher identity and, in turn, teaching practice.

Details

Narrative Inquiries into Curriculum Making in Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-591-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce …

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Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Nicola J. Beatson, David A.G. Berg, Jeffrey K. Smith and Christine Smith-Han

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of a rule that affects tertiary students progressing from an introductory level finance course to intermediate level. The rule…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of a rule that affects tertiary students progressing from an introductory level finance course to intermediate level. The rule restricted students from progressing until they achieved a higher grade than just a “pass” mark.

Design/methodology/approach

Archival data were gathered from 11 semesters regarding student performance pre and post the rule being introduced.

Findings

Results show that the rule was associated with an increase in the chances of success at intermediate level for those students enrolled after the rule was introduced.

Practical implications

This paper’s main contribution regards the evidence that increasing prior learning at an introductory level has a positive follow-on effect for students learning at intermediate level. This has a practical implication for educators, as the rule has shown to increase the chance of success for knowledge development in the first year of studies.

Originality/value

The setting for this paper is unique and could potentially be replicated elsewhere. In 1980, Schaffer and Calkins called for an evaluation of the pre-requisites necessary for finance education at the tertiary level, and this paper answer this call stating that pre-requisites can contribute to the academic success of finance students.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Education Policy as a Roadmap for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-298-5

1 – 10 of 78