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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Pat Reid and Dewald van Niekerk

The promulgation of disaster management legislation and policy in South Africa necessitates the development of a uniform multi‐agency incident and disaster response

Abstract

Purpose

The promulgation of disaster management legislation and policy in South Africa necessitates the development of a uniform multi‐agency incident and disaster response system. This paper aims to argue that a uniform response by numerous government agencies in South Africa can only be achieved through the application of an accepted model, which is based on the requirements of the Disaster Management Act 57 of 2002 as well as the National Disaster Risk Management Framework of South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was developed using grounded theory methodology through the use of the internet and focus group interviews with South African as well as international experts. During the process of analysing the data by open and axial coding, key elements emerged which were then clustered into categories from which the core concepts of the model emerged. The emergent core concepts were then dimensionalised, which formed the major constructs of the model thereby ensuring that the model was grounded in the theory. Constant comparisons were drawn with the experiences in the field throughout the process in order to ensure theoretical sensitivity. During the process of axial coding certain intervening conditions emerged which could negatively or positively affect its application. The developed model was therefore subjected to scrutiny by means of a quantitative attitudinal test amongst senior professionals involved in the field of emergency and disaster management, resulting in triangulation.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that in order for the proposed model to be implemented effectively it is necessary to refine each level of response in terms of authority, communication and reporting lines.

Originality/value

This model can be used as the foundation for the development of a comprehensive response management system for South Africa and other similar countries, and that the model can further contribute to the development of a basic training module for inclusion in the curricula of response agency personnel.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Carl Adams and Andreas Neef

This chapter presents an exploration of the ways in which humanitarian non-government organisations (NGOs) and communities affected by the 2014 floods in Solomon Islands…

Abstract

This chapter presents an exploration of the ways in which humanitarian non-government organisations (NGOs) and communities affected by the 2014 floods in Solomon Islands interpreted and responded to the disaster, identifying factors that assisted and constrained stakeholders in disaster response and recovery. The research investigates the extent to which communities were consulted and participated in NGO responses, and the factors which informed community–NGO relationships. A qualitative case study approach was used, employing interviews, focus groups and document analysis, guided by a reflexive discourse analysis and narrative inquiry approach, which places the focus of the study on the experiences of participants. Communities played very limited roles in NGO responses, especially non-dominant or marginalised sectors of society, such as youth, women and people with disabilities. Failure to respond appropriately to the differentiated needs of affected populations can exacerbate their risk of experiencing secondary disaster. The authors argue that there is a need to improve the inclusiveness of responses to disaster, engaging women, youth and people with disabilities in decision making in order to respond more appropriately to their needs.

Details

Climate-Induced Disasters in the Asia-Pacific Region: Response, Recovery, Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-987-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Samantha Melis and Dorothea Hilhorst

When a major landslide and floods devastated Freetown, Sierra Leone had just overcome the Ebola crisis, which had left its mark on socio-political relations between…

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1195

Abstract

Purpose

When a major landslide and floods devastated Freetown, Sierra Leone had just overcome the Ebola crisis, which had left its mark on socio-political relations between different disaster response actors. With international disaster response frameworks increasingly shifting to local ownership, the national government was expected to assume a coordinating role. However, in “post-conflict” settings such as Sierra Leone, intra-state and state–society relations are continuously being renegotiated. This study aimed to uncover the complexities of state-led disaster response in hybrid governance setting at national and community levels in the response to the 2017 landslide and floods.

Design/methodology/approach

During the four months of fieldwork in Freetown in 2017, semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with various state, aid and societal actors were conducted.

Findings

The findings show that a response to policy building on the idea of a uniform state response did not take into account intra-state power politics or the complexity of Sierra Leone's hybrid governance.

Practical implications

This paper argues for a more nuanced debate in humanitarian governance and practice on the localisation of aid in post-conflict and fragile settings.

Originality/value

The study's findings contribute to the literature on the disaster–conflict nexus, identifying paradoxes of localised disaster response in an environment with strong national–local tensions. The study highlights intra-local state dynamics that are usually overlooked but have a great impact on the legitimacy of different state authorities in disaster response.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Charles Kelly

Presents a practical framework within which disaster responseoperational effectiveness can be balanced with cost efficiency. Thisbalancing is accomplished through a…

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2976

Abstract

Presents a practical framework within which disaster response operational effectiveness can be balanced with cost efficiency. This balancing is accomplished through a systematic proactive planning of response requirements, costs projections, procurement and resource mobilization. The framework is useful in general disaster response planning and in the development of cost‐efficient procedures for supporting disaster response efforts. It is generic and can be adapted to local conditions and requirements.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Irina Dolinskaya, Maria Besiou and Sara Guerrero-Garcia

Following a large-scale disaster, medical assistance is a critical component of the emergency response. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

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1270

Abstract

Purpose

Following a large-scale disaster, medical assistance is a critical component of the emergency response. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Academic and practitioner literature is used to develop a framework studying the effectiveness of the humanitarian medical supply chain (HMSC). The framework is validated by using the findings of interviews conducted with experts and the case study of a serious humanitarian medical crisis (Ebola outbreak in 2014).

Findings

The factors affecting the effectiveness of the HMSC are identified.

Research limitations/implications

To get an expert opinion on the major logistical challenges of the medical assistance in emergencies only 11 interviews with practitioners were conducted.

Originality/value

While the existing academic literature discusses the distribution of various supplies needed by the affected population, limited research focuses specifically on studying the HMSC aspect of the response. This paper closes this gap by describing the HMSC in the case of disaster response, and identifying the factors affecting its effectiveness, especially focusing on the factors that are unique to the medical aspect of the humanitarian supply chain.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Chul Hyun Park and Erik Johnston

When catastrophic disasters recently occurred, digital volunteer networks formed by the public emerged across the globe. They aggregated, analyzed and visualized disaster

Abstract

Purpose

When catastrophic disasters recently occurred, digital volunteer networks formed by the public emerged across the globe. They aggregated, analyzed and visualized disaster data. Those volunteer networks sometimes shared their data with formal response organizations. Such data sharing and integration increased the capacity of formal response organizations for dealing with disasters. However, despite the emergence and contributions of digital volunteer networks, the literature has been focused primarily on the role of formal response organizations such as emergency management agencies and the Red Cross. The purpose of this paper is to describe how technical and organizational factors influence collaboration between digital volunteer networks and formal response organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a case study method, focusing on the 2015 Nepal earthquake.

Findings

This study found that information technology and a shared understanding of disaster situations and how to address disasters are key determinants of collaboration between digital volunteer networks and formal response organizations.

Originality/value

This research is expected to contribute to building an integrated emergency response system in the information age.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Martina K. Linnenluecke and Brent McKnight

The paper aims to examine the conditions under which disaster entrepreneurship contributes to community-level resilience. The authors define disaster entrepreneurship as…

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1742

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the conditions under which disaster entrepreneurship contributes to community-level resilience. The authors define disaster entrepreneurship as attempts by the private sector to create or maintain value during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster by taking advantage of business opportunities and providing goods and services required by community stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds a typology of disaster entrepreneurial responses by drawing on the dimensions of structural expansion and role change. The authors use illustrative case examples to conceptualize how these responses improve community resilience by filling critical resource voids in the aftermath of natural disasters.

Findings

The typology identifies four different disaster entrepreneurship approaches: entrepreneurial business continuity, scaling of organizational response through activating latent structures, improvising and emergence. The authors formulate proposition regarding how each of the approaches is related to community-level resilience.

Practical implications

While disaster entrepreneurship can offer for-profit opportunities for engaging in community-wide disaster response and recovery efforts, firms should carefully consider the financial, legal, reputational and organizational implications of disaster entrepreneurship.

Social implications

Communities should consider how best to harness disaster entrepreneurship in designing their disaster response strategies.

Originality/value

This research offers a novel typology to explore the role that for-profit firms play in disaster contexts and adds to prior research which has mostly focused on government agencies, non-governmental organizations and emergency personnel.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2003

James M Kendra and Tricia Wachtendorf

The World Trade Center disaster generated many of the features seen in other disasters in the U.S., including post-disaster convergence. We conceptualize emergency…

Abstract

The World Trade Center disaster generated many of the features seen in other disasters in the U.S., including post-disaster convergence. We conceptualize emergency management activities as taking place within a multilocational “response milieu,” and we suggest that the study of convergence should focus on the negotiated legitimacy of people in and wishing to enter it. We discuss the five types of personal convergers and how the access of each of these groups to the response milieu was related to their legitimation status. We then identify two additional forms of convergence: supporters or fans, and those who came to mourn or to memorialize. We conclude by discussing implications for policy.

Details

Terrorism and Disaster: New Threats, New Ideas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-227-6

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2015

Lisa Grow Sun and Sabrina McCormick

The intensifying effects of climate change and the growing concentration of population in hazardous locations mean that, for many communities, disasters are increasingly…

Abstract

The intensifying effects of climate change and the growing concentration of population in hazardous locations mean that, for many communities, disasters are increasingly becoming not only foreseeable, but inevitable. While much attention is, and should be, focused on what these foreseeable disasters require in terms of disaster planning and mitigation, attention should also be focused on a related and equally pressing phenomena: mismanagement of disaster response, particularly as climate proves an increasing stressor. Like disasters themselves, disaster mismanagement – while not entirely predictable – may exhibit some predictable patterns. This chapter explores past disaster management failures, considers how climate change may alter or exacerbate certain response pathologies, and evaluates some potential remedies that might mitigate these challenges.

Details

Special Issue Cassandra’s Curse: The Law and Foreseeable Future Disasters
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-299-3

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Marcia Perry

The paper aims to discuss the findings of a humanitarian logistics manager field study on response activity concerning the 2004 tsunami disaster in terms of what should…

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12828

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to discuss the findings of a humanitarian logistics manager field study on response activity concerning the 2004 tsunami disaster in terms of what should have occurred and to present a comprehensive hindsight‐analysis case for a model placing natural disaster response activity clearly within the context of local‐nation‐led, holistic and inclusive natural disaster planning.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative testing of a conceptual framework of natural‐disaster response requirements through interviews with tsunami‐response logistics managers, the analysis of the findings in the light of tsunami‐hindsight “effective disaster management” themes of recent academic literature and multi‐agency reports and the development of the holistic, inclusive planning model.

Findings

That natural disaster response activity needs to be viewed holistically in the context of a disaster management planning continuum that ideally starts well before the response action is required and of which locally‐led inclusiveness is a crucial component.

Research limitations/implications

The model needs to be tested for its applicability as a planning instrument and guide for response activity in the context of future natural disasters.

Practical implications

The holistic/inclusive planning model has been developed to guide natural disaster planners as well as add to academic discourse in the search for natural disaster management solutions.

Originality/value

The study is original with its field‐based qualitative research foundation and reflective hindsight analysis.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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