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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Damilola Ekundayo, Chika Udeaja and Uthman Olawande Abubakar

Although several studies have been undertaken on sustainability within infrastructure projects, limited attention has paid to the drivers for, and the barriers to, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although several studies have been undertaken on sustainability within infrastructure projects, limited attention has paid to the drivers for, and the barriers to, the incorporation of sustainability in public–private partnership (PPP) infrastructure projects through empirical study, particularly in Nigeria. Therefore, this study aims to identify and examine the drivers that promote sustainability in Nigerian PPP infrastructure projects and assess the barriers to the full integration of sustainability practices into current Nigerian PPP infrastructure projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected using a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire survey was targeted on four different stakeholders’ organizations. They were public sector authorities, concessionaires, consultants and banks already undertaking PPP infrastructure projects in Lagos State, Nigeria. The obtained data were analyzed using frequency, percentage, mean score, standard deviation and the Kruskal–Wallis test.

Findings

The study identified 17 drivers that promote the incorporation of sustainability in PPP infrastructure projects. The analysis of the total ranking of the drivers in Nigeria revealed the top five ranked drivers to be: consideration of long-term performance; contractual arrangements; incentives for new market penetration; award criteria; and selection criteria, respectively. The study further identified 11 barriers to sustainability integration in PPP infrastructure projects and the top five ranked barriers in Nigeria are as follows: comprehensive sustainability procurement guidelines; no enabling environment; education needs; uncertain economic environment; and a lack of clear government policy, respectively. The results of the Kruskal–Wallis test conducted on both the 17 identified drivers for, and the 11 barriers to, the incorporation of sustainability in Nigerian PPP infrastructure projects revealed that there is no significant statistical difference in both rankings from the perceptions of the aforementioned four different respondents’ groups.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides empirical insights on the knowledge and awareness of drivers which could lead to a greater uptake in sustainability measures by the stakeholders in Nigerian PPP projects; it also identified barriers to overcome.

Originality/value

The importance of the incorporation of sustainability in public procurement cannot be over-emphasized. It is anticipated that the study will be of great value to PPP stakeholders involved in sustainability decision-making processes when delivering sustainable PPP projects.

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Lukman E. Mansuri, D.A. Patel, Chika Udeaja, Busisiwe Chikomborero Ncube Makore, Claudia Trillo, Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah and Kumar Neeraj Jha

Across the architecture, engineering and construction industry, the application of building information modelling (BIM) as a digital technology for architectural heritage…

Abstract

Purpose

Across the architecture, engineering and construction industry, the application of building information modelling (BIM) as a digital technology for architectural heritage is becoming increasingly relevant. However, scholarly research on the application of BIM for architectural heritage is still in its infancy stage and the research gaps and future directions of this research area are still unclear. This paper therefore aims to fill this gap by using a systematic and robust review using a mixed-method approach to show the gaps of research for BIM and architectural heritage and point to new directions for future works.

Design/methodology/approach

The study includes a quantitative scientometric analysis and mapping and a qualitative study. A total of 354 articles related to BIM and architectural heritage were analysed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative tools. The qualitative study consists of a systematic literature review supported by data collected from stakeholder and training workshops on digital technologies and BIM for heritage.

Findings

Findings from this study reveal the gaps in the field of heritage and BIM research according to retrieved articles from different countries and journals. Furthermore, emerging domains for future research were identified and these included: as-built modelling and 3D reconstruction; conservation, preservation and management; documentation; maintenance and restoration; virtual technology and simulation.

Originality/value

The common research challenges were identified as an integrated outcome of the findings revealed from the scientometric mapping and qualitative review and resulted in key BIM and heritage research priority recommendations relevant to researchers within this field.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2020

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Chika Udeaja and Adedayo Opeyemi Adekunle

BIM has much potential to improve the effectiveness of construction works with respect to design, construction and maintenance. However, many Architecture, Engineering…

Abstract

Purpose

BIM has much potential to improve the effectiveness of construction works with respect to design, construction and maintenance. However, many Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) firms are still lagging in the adoption and implementation of BIM in both developing and developed countries. The purpose of this study is to assess the barriers to BIM implementation, and examine the ways forward to improve BIM adoption within the Nigerian AEC firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review and questionnaire survey were used in the study. The survey targeted four different AEC firms. These include architectural firms, facility management firms, quantity surveying firms and structural engineering firms in Lagos, Nigeria. The data obtained were analyzed using mean score, standard deviation, Kruskal–Wallis test, and factor analysis.

Findings

The study identified 20 barriers to BIM implementation and identified ten ways forward to improve BIM adoption in AEC firms, particularly in Nigeria. The relative importance of both the identified barriers and the ways forward were gauged. The Kruskal–Wallis tests revealed that except for one (out of 20) identified barriers, and one (out of 10) identified ways forward; there is no statistical significant difference in the perceptions of four different AEC firms. The factor analysis result grouped the 20 identified barriers into three major factors to include: weak top management support and BIM environment related issues; cost of BIM software and training issues; and incompatibility, legal, contractual, and culture related issues.

Practical implications

The significance of the study cannot be over-emphasized due to BIM relevance to construction stakeholders and researchers at large.

Originality/value

The study findings would inform the decisions of the construction stakeholders to make some policy recommendations capable of positively influencing the full BIM implementation in AEC firms.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Chijindu V. Nwachukwu, Chika Udeaja, Nicholas Chileshe and Chimene E. Okere

Built heritage or historic assets (BHAs) constructed in the pre-nineteenth century in the UK are perceived to have certain characteristics which instill cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Built heritage or historic assets (BHAs) constructed in the pre-nineteenth century in the UK are perceived to have certain characteristics which instill cultural significance in them and have seen them become valuable to the economy of the country. The heritage sector makes significant contributions to the UK economy through provision of tourist attractive sites, construction and servicing of heritage assets, heritage conservation, research, and commercial activities carried out within and around heritage assets. These benefits have seen them draw considerable interests from diverse stakeholders within and outside the heritage sector. Hence, a lot of attention is drawn toward restoration of such assets, from stakeholders of different interests, ranging from advocacies for no alteration to complete alteration of the heritage assets. As with construction projects, conflict of interests amongst stakeholders affect the outcome of restoration projects and the purpose of this paper is to examine the critical success factors (CSFs) for managing the stakeholders to achieve the projects’ objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the views and experiences of practitioners in the heritage sector who have been involved with BHA restoration projects. A total of 32 CSFs for stakeholder management, obtained through rigorous reviews of literature, were subjected to a severe scrutiny with eight restoration experts to determine the importance of the CSFs in restoration projects. The outcome of the exercise was a modified list of 20 CSFs which were further tested on 52 restoration practitioners in the UK using a structured questionnaire to determine the degree of importance of each of the CSFs in restoration projects and their relationships as perceived by the practitioners.

Findings

The results of the analyses performed on the data show that most of the CSFs were perceived by restoration practitioners as truly critical and vital for successful management of stakeholders in restoration of BHAs. The results also indicate that there is a strong consensus amongst over 50 percent of the practitioners on the rankings of the CSFs.

Practical implications

The identified CSFs could be used by the restoration practitioners as a “road map” for the development of appropriate solutions for successfully managing stakeholders associated with the promotion and BHAs restoration assets.

Originality/value

Although CSFs for stakeholder management in construction have been studied by many scholars, no specific research could be identified prior to this study to have been done in defining the CSFs for stakeholder management in restoration projects.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Damilola Ekundayo, Chika Udeaja and Uthman Olawande Abubakar

In the global construction industry, the concept of sustainability is not new, particularly within building projects. Against this backdrop, several studies have been…

Abstract

Purpose

In the global construction industry, the concept of sustainability is not new, particularly within building projects. Against this backdrop, several studies have been conducted, mostly in developed countries, on sustainability in construction projects. However, efforts at investigating sustainability practices in public–private partnership (PPP) infrastructure projects in developing countries have received limited attention. Hence, the purpose of this study is to investigate the incorporation of sustainability practices within the context of Nigeria’s PPP infrastructure projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey, which targeted four different types of stakeholders, was conducted in this study. These stakeholders included public sector authorities, concessionaires, consultants and banks undertaking PPP infrastructure projects in the Lagos State, Nigeria. The data collected were analyzed using frequency, percentage, mean score, standard deviation (SD) analyses and the Kruskal–Wallis test.

Findings

The findings of this study revealed that all the respondents are very much aware of sustainability principles and the vast majority of the respondents from the public sector authorities and the consultant organizations confirmed that they have incorporated sustainability requirements into their bidding documents for PPP infrastructure projects. The study revealed sustainability features in the three aspects of sustainability, namely, economic, environmental and social factors. Furthermore, the study revealed the top three–ranked economic factors of sustainability (considered to be the most important factors) were low maintenance costs, whole life costing and supporting the local economy, respectively. Similarly, the study revealed the top three–ranked environmental factors of sustainability were biodiversity, energy use during the operation stage and energy use during the construction stage, respectively. Furthermore, the study further revealed that the top three–ranked social factors of sustainability were the educational aspect, equity between stakeholders and health and safety, respectively.

Practical implications

The study will be of great value to PPP stakeholders involved in sustainability decision-making processes when delivering sustainable PPP projects, particularly in Nigeria. Also, the study’s findings are important as not many empirical studies have been conducted on the sustainability practices of current PPP projects in Nigeria.

Originality/value

The study’s findings would further inform the need for both the public and private sectors to take a more strategic approach to enhance sustainability in PPP projects.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Srinath Perera, Lei Zhou and Chika Udeaja

– The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the perceptions of stakeholders on critical success factors (CSFs) for Public Private Partnership (PPP) projects in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the perceptions of stakeholders on critical success factors (CSFs) for Public Private Partnership (PPP) projects in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify the CSFs for PPP projects, which were employed to design a questionnaire survey. In order to capture a broad perception of stakeholders, the questionnaires were administered to five different stakeholder organisations involved in different PPP projects implementation in Nigeria. Data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics, mean score, Kruskal-Wallis test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and factor analysis.

Findings

The study revealed the result of mean score ranking, which indicated that all the stakeholders considered the identified 26 CSFs important and crucial for the successful implementation of PPP projects in Nigeria. Thus, the results of Kruskal-Wallis test and ANOVA indicated that except for six (out of 26) identified CSFs, there is no statistically significant difference in the perceptions of the stakeholders on CSFs for PPP projects in Nigeria. The study, through factor analysis, grouped the 26 identified CSFs into six principal factors.

Practical implications

This research would be of benefit to stakeholders in PPPs to be aware of CSFs that demand utmost consideration. Also the identified CSFs are expected to enhance the success rate of PPP projects.

Originality/value

The findings would be useful for PPP stakeholders in making decisions and in implementing PPP projects towards achieving value for money. This research will also be of interest to other academic researchers intending to investigate CSFs for PPP projects in other locations.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Nicholas Chileshe, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, M. Reza Hosseini, Steffen Lehmann and Chika Udeaja

A large number of benefits have been reported when reverse logistics (RL) is fully implemented in the construction industry. However, RL is yet to become common place in…

Abstract

Purpose

A large number of benefits have been reported when reverse logistics (RL) is fully implemented in the construction industry. However, RL is yet to become common place in the construction sector, particularly in Australia. The particular sub-sector in which RL operates is small and weak and the remainder of the sector must embrace and accommodate it comfortably. Research is lacking on how to promoting RL in the construction industry. Very little has been done to identify the current practices that have the potential to promote RL industry-wide. The purpose of this paper is to identify the practices that work well in the sector, a strategy could be mapped out to promote RL to all stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to fill the above gap, the present study used a mixed method approach to gather and evaluate current practices and their potential to promote RL in South Australia’s construction industry. Practices that were identified using a comprehensive literature review were evaluated with a questionnaire survey and series of interviews involving construction professionals.

Findings

The findings are that practices facilitating deconstruction is the most important, followed by practices facilitating the use of salvaged materials in new construction to promote RL in South Australia. Awareness of deconstruction benefits, challenges and procedures at the organisation level and facilities and services at industry level were associated with RL implementation. Availability of salvaged materials in the market was found to influence its use in new construction and as a consequence its demand. Designing for reverse logistics is another practice that could facilitate deconstruction and the onus of its promotion lies mainly with the designers.

Research limitations/implications

This research was confined to one state in Australia. As such the generalisation to other states and other countries should be treated cautiously.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can help inform the industry and its stakeholders on areas that they need to concentrate more on to make the South Australian construction industry a fully RL integrated one. To that end the authors propose some recommendations arising from the findings reported here.

Originality/value

This study makes a contribution to the body of knowledge on reserve logistics within a previously unexplored South Australian context. In addition, the study provides valuable insights into the contribution of RL practices to the construction industry.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Srinath Perera, Lei Zhou and Chika Udeaja

Studies on barriers to public private partnerships (PPPs) in Nigeria, especially those that are empirical, remain rare. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to identify and…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies on barriers to public private partnerships (PPPs) in Nigeria, especially those that are empirical, remain rare. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to identify and classify barriers to PPP projects implementation in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected through the administration of questionnaires to public sector authorities, concessionaires, local lenders, consultants, and contractors already involved in PPP projects. Data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics, mean score, Kruskal-Wallis test, and factor analysis.

Findings

The study identified 58 barriers and the analysis of the total ranking among stakeholders revealed that all the identified barriers were considered as serious barriers influencing PPP projects in Nigeria. The result of Kruskal-Wallis test indicated that except for 18 (out of 58) identified barriers, there was no statistical significant difference in stakeholders’ perceptions on barriers to PPPs project implementation in Nigeria. The study through factor analysis grouped the identified 58 barriers into ten principal factors with their components.

Practical implications

This study provides an in-depth understanding on Nigeria’s PPP market environment current context in terms of prevalent barriers influencing PPPs project. This would be beneficial to PPP stakeholders in decision making and planning towards PPP projects implementation.

Originality/value

The findings would be valuable in assisting all stakeholders, particularly potential local, and foreign private investors to recognise major barriers in the implementation of PPP projects in Nigeria and thus helping them to develop strategies for penetrating Nigeria and developing countries PPP market successfully. This study results are crucial as not many empirical studies have been conducted in Nigeria.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

David Oloke

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Mohan Kumaraswamy

Abstract

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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