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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2020

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Chika Udeaja and Adedayo Opeyemi Adekunle

BIM has much potential to improve the effectiveness of construction works with respect to design, construction and maintenance. However, many Architecture, Engineering…

Abstract

Purpose

BIM has much potential to improve the effectiveness of construction works with respect to design, construction and maintenance. However, many Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) firms are still lagging in the adoption and implementation of BIM in both developing and developed countries. The purpose of this study is to assess the barriers to BIM implementation, and examine the ways forward to improve BIM adoption within the Nigerian AEC firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review and questionnaire survey were used in the study. The survey targeted four different AEC firms. These include architectural firms, facility management firms, quantity surveying firms and structural engineering firms in Lagos, Nigeria. The data obtained were analyzed using mean score, standard deviation, Kruskal–Wallis test, and factor analysis.

Findings

The study identified 20 barriers to BIM implementation and identified ten ways forward to improve BIM adoption in AEC firms, particularly in Nigeria. The relative importance of both the identified barriers and the ways forward were gauged. The Kruskal–Wallis tests revealed that except for one (out of 20) identified barriers, and one (out of 10) identified ways forward; there is no statistical significant difference in the perceptions of four different AEC firms. The factor analysis result grouped the 20 identified barriers into three major factors to include: weak top management support and BIM environment related issues; cost of BIM software and training issues; and incompatibility, legal, contractual, and culture related issues.

Practical implications

The significance of the study cannot be over-emphasized due to BIM relevance to construction stakeholders and researchers at large.

Originality/value

The study findings would inform the decisions of the construction stakeholders to make some policy recommendations capable of positively influencing the full BIM implementation in AEC firms.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2020

Saznizam Sazmee Sinoh, Faridah Othman and Zainah Ibrahim

This paper aimed to identify critical success factors (CSFs) of building information modeling (BIM) implementation among architectural, engineering and construction (AEC

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to identify critical success factors (CSFs) of building information modeling (BIM) implementation among architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) firms in Malaysia using quantitative statistical methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted on the population of all AEC firms in Malaysia to rank the relative importance of 15 success factors (SFs) for BIM implementation in the firm on a 5-point Likert scale. The sampling frame consisted of all members registered with the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) from which 184 responses were received. The distinction between SFs and CSFs was achieved by a normalized mean cutoff value. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine the relative groupings of the CSFs and structural equation modeling (SEM) were used to examine the underlying relationships between the CSF groupings.

Findings

Results of this study validated 11 previously identified CSFs for successful implementation of BIM among Malaysian AEC firms. Non-technical factors such as management, leadership and coordination were found to have higher relevance compared to technical factors such as software and hardware. Ranking analysis of the CSFs found internal coordination factors to have more importance compared to external coordination factors. PCA revealed 4 principal components (PCs) from the 11 CSFs. Together, these four PCs explain 74.3% of the variance in the data. Also, six hypothesized relationships between these groupings were supported using PLS-SEM.

Research limitations/implications

This study found an interaction between internal and external coordination factors for the implementation of BIM. Future research could explore the dynamics of both intra- and inter-firm coordination, which may create an environment suitable for BIM implementation.

Practical implications

This study provides Malaysian AEC firms with a general strategy on how to approach the implementation of BIM within the firm. In addition, government initiatives should focus on increasing BIM competency of graduates entering the workforce. This can be achieved through the development of a national BIM curriculum. Apart from that, the implementation of BIM requires a radical shift in the traditional building delivery process, not just simply acquiring new software and hardware.

Originality/value

This study revealed that the interactions between different firms at the industry level can influence successful implementation of BIM at the firm level. CSFs for BIM implementation at the firm level have been extensively studied. However, few studies exist which explore the inter-firm collaborations at the industry level that facilitate successful BIM implementation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2017

Jardar Lohne, Fredrik Svalestuen, Vegard Knotten, Frode Olav Drevland and Ola Lædre

The purpose of this paper is to report on studies on the ethics in the design phase in Norwegian construction projects. The ambition is to establish a descriptive picture…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on studies on the ethics in the design phase in Norwegian construction projects. The ambition is to establish a descriptive picture of ethical challenges practitioners meet in the design phase in order to raise awareness among them.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to a literature review and a document study of ethical frameworks within the industry, interviews with key participants were carried out according to a qualitative approach. The study was undertaken in order to address framework conditions for handling ethically challenging situations, challenges of an ethical nature practitioners commonly encounter in the design phase and finally the structural (systemic) reasons for such challenges.

Findings

This research finds indications of actors manoeuvring in the design phase for own benefit at the expense of other actors. The findings equally indicate that the design phase poses significant challenges in light of tender documents pricing and exploiting cost reimbursement contracts. In some of the projects examined, participants shifted loyalty after novation contracting and they actively tried to steer the decision processes in their own favour.

Originality/value

There does in fact seem to be perceptions of a room of manoeuvre between what is unlawful and what is ethically sound in this phase.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Graham Brewer and Thayaparan Gajendran

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an appropriate investigative mechanism deployed to uncover the link between individual attitude, consequent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an appropriate investigative mechanism deployed to uncover the link between individual attitude, consequent decision making and development of group culture, and their impact on the use of information and communication technology/building information modelling (ICT/BIM) across a temporary project organisation (TPO).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a protocol and conducts a case study of a specialist subcontractor associated with the design and construction of an engineered facade operating in a specific TPO. It adopts a phenomenological perspective, utilising ethnographic data collection techniques and constructivist analysis/abstraction.

Findings

Differentiation resulted in impaired e‐business activity; however, there was a positive impact on the overall project outcome. This was attributed to the positive cultural traits demonstrated by the specialist subcontractor. Individuals' attitudinal traits develop over time through personal experiences and interaction with others. These traits are transportable and potentially infectious, as in this case, where the result was beneficial to the stakeholders.

Originality/value

The paper describes the successful implementation of an appropriate investigative protocol to chart the links between the beliefs and actions of individuals in relation to ICT/BIM, and the consequences for TPO culture and the project as a whole.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Florence Yean Yng Ling

The objectives of this paper are to investigate the reasons that motivate foreign architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) firms to undertake projects in China;…

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are to investigate the reasons that motivate foreign architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) firms to undertake projects in China; whether foreign AEC firms derive significant benefits after working in China; and the strengths that foreign AEC firms need to possess in order to work in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives were achieved through a postal survey, using a structured questionnaire. Data were collected from American and Singaporean firms.

Findings

Firms do indeed derive many benefits when undertaking projects in China. These include geographical diversification, monetary benefits, technical benefits and deepened relationships. Foreign AEC firms should possess strengths such as excellent track record, superior management capability and high product and service quality.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this research is that it addresses motivations and benefits, but does not explain how to win and manage projects in China. Further research in these areas will be conducted.

Practical implications

Foreign practitioners should not ignore China market, but invest in China on a long term basis to reap many rewards.

Originality/value

This paper is original because it quantifies the benefits that foreign AEC firms will reap if they undertake projects in China.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2021

Nguyen Van Tam, Nguyen Quoc Toan, Vu Van Phong and Serdar Durdyev

This study aims to investigate the impact of primary building information modelling (BIM)-related factors, extracted from the literature on the subject, on construction…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of primary building information modelling (BIM)-related factors, extracted from the literature on the subject, on construction project performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data collected from 134 BIM users, this study used structural equation modelling to assess the impact of these factors in five main BIM-related factor clusters.

Findings

The results of the analysis confirmed the reliability and validity of the research design and outcomes. The findings indicated that the BIM-related external factors cluster is the most influential cluster affecting construction project performance. BIM-related project factors and BIM-related technological factors also had a significant impact on project performance. These were followed by the BIM-related management factors cluster, while the BIM-related human factors cluster had a low impact on project performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study will contribute to fostering BIM adoption and implementation in the construction industry in developing countries.

Originality/value

This study has filled a crucial knowledge gap by providing information on manageable primary BIM-related factors affecting construction project performance.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Damilola Ekundayo, Adedayo Opeyemi Adekunle and Wasiu Bello

Building information modelling (BIM) adoption is vital to the productivity and competitive nature of the construction sector. However, BIM adoptions have not been…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) adoption is vital to the productivity and competitive nature of the construction sector. However, BIM adoptions have not been generally embraced by many architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) firms, particularly in developing countries. Moreover, studies that investigate the important drivers to BIM adoptions among construction professionals through quantitative approach are limited. The purpose of this study is to address the aforementioned gap.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involves a literature review, a pilot study and a questionnaire survey. The primary data were carried out using structured questionnaires distributed to four different BIM adopter AEC firms. These comprised architectural firms, facility management firms, quantity surveying firms and structural engineering firms in Lagos, Nigeria. Data obtained were analysed using mean score, standard deviation, Kruskal–Wallis test and factor analysis.

Findings

The study identified 23 drivers to BIM adoption, and the relative importance of the identified drivers was gauged from each selected BIM adopter AEC firm category. The result of the Kruskal–Wallis test showed that there is no statistically significant difference in the perceptions of the four selected AEC firms in the mean ranking of the identified 23 drivers to BIM adoption. The findings from factor analysis categorized the identified drivers into two major factors to include cost and time savings, improved communication, and BIM awareness and government supports.

Practical implications

The study empirically identifies important drivers to BIM adoption that will be useful for construction stakeholders to formulate strategies to adopt the full implementation of BIM in the AEC firms of Nigeria and other developing countries. Also, this study is important as it identifies, analyses and compares the drivers to BIM adoptions from four different AEC firms, thereby providing robust and more reliable findings.

Originality/value

The study findings will provide information to policymakers and construction stakeholders to make policy recommendations that are capable of positively influencing the widespread adoption of BIM in AEC firms in particular and the construction industry at large. This study is important because the studies that comparatively and empirically analyzed BIM drivers in AEC firms are rare, particularly in developing countries. Hence, this study could be used to benchmark future studies in developing countries.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2020

Shuangliang Tai, Yao Zhang and Ting Li

The purpose of this paper is to promote the application of building information modeling (BIM) in China’s construction industry, key factors and their relationships are explored.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote the application of building information modeling (BIM) in China’s construction industry, key factors and their relationships are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, 28 factors were extracted and their relationships (239 in total) obtained using the Delphi method. A social network model of the factors was constructed and factors were analyzed using social network analysis (SNA).

Findings

The top 10 key factors and their relationships were obtained using SNA. Among the top 10 critical factors, six were source factors. They were: training for the application of BIM, guidance from experts, proper management modes, efficient BIM teams, specifications and demonstrations and standards for building information communication. The other four factors included as follows: a willingness to accept BIM, knowledge of its value and benefits, the definition of its benefits and the availability of IT software and hardware. These were mediating factors that could further the influence of the source factors.

Originality/value

The results provide useful information for public agencies and professionals to understand the immediate and mediating influences of the factors on the application of BIM. Solutions and future efforts for different participants are presented to promote the application of BIM-based on the key factors and their relationships.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

M.Reza Hosseini, Nicholas Chileshe, Jian Zuo and Bassam Baroudi

This study aims to present an integrated conceptual model in order to highlight the major aspects of diffusion of innovations in the architecture, engineering and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present an integrated conceptual model in order to highlight the major aspects of diffusion of innovations in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) context. To this end, a critical review of literature is conducted, accompanied by synthesising the findings of previous studies. The driving force behind this study is stemmed from the fragmentation of literature on innovation diffusion, and paucity of research on diffusion of Global Virtual Engineering Teams (GVETs) as the platform for many technological innovations in relevant literature. Thus, the present study is intended to facilitate filling the gap in GVETs literature. That is, the proposed model will offer a foundation for academia for grounding studies on any innovation including GVETs in the literature on innovation diffusion in the AEC context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon the qualitative meta-analysis approach encompassing a critical review of the relevant literature. To this end, the review builds upon studies found within 15 prestigious journals in AEC. The domain of this review was confined to areas described as “innovation”, “innovation diffusion” and “innovation adoption”, along with keywords used within a broad review of recently published GVETs literature. The rigour of review is augmented by incorporating 35 authoritative works from other disciplines published in 21 well-known journals in the manufacturing, business and management fields. Moreover, the study deploys the peer-debriefing approach through conducting unstructured interviews with five Australian scholars to verify a model presenting an aggregated summary of previous studies.

Findings

The key findings of the study include the following items: synthesising the fragmented studies on innovation diffusion in the AEC context. In doing so, a model capturing the major aspects affecting diffusion of an innovation in AEC projects is presented; providing a foundation to address the drawbacks of previous studies within the sphere of GVETs, based on the developed model.

Research limitations/implications

The developed model was only enhanced using a small sample size of academics, as such not empirically validated.

Originality/value

As possibly, the first literature review of innovation in the AEC context, this paper contributes to the sphere by sensitising the AEC body of knowledge on innovation diffusion as a concise conceptual model, albeit verified through the peer-debriefing approach. This study will also further establish the research field in AEC on GVETs along with other methods reliant on virtual working such as building information modelling (BIM) through providing an expanded foundation for future inquiries and creation of knowledge.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Jing Wang and Weisheng Lu

Over the past two decades, building information modeling (BIM) has been promoted as one of the most disruptive innovations across the global architecture, engineering and…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past two decades, building information modeling (BIM) has been promoted as one of the most disruptive innovations across the global architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) community. Nevertheless, despite its widely propagated benefits, BIM adoption in various localities is not progressing excitingly. BIM as an innovation developed from a presumed, general context may not fit well with the specific regulatory, social and cultural settings of a locality. This study aims to tackle the lukewarm local BIM adoption by developing a deployment framework for BIM localization.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon the diffusion of innovation (DoI) theory, a longitudinal case study is designed and conducted by engaging closely with a top cost consultancy company in Hong Kong for forty-one months.

Findings

The findings refuted the “one-size-fits-for-all” view to use a standardized BIM for international users. Rather, an organization needs to undergo a series of localization works to integrate global BIM in its specific local context. The deployment framework outlines the BIM dimensions (i.e. technology, process and protocol) and the mechanisms (i.e. configuration, coupling and reinterpretation) of BIM localization that go through the three “A”s (i.e. analysis, adaption and assimilation) process under a firm's network and contextual factors.

Originality/value

This study improves our understanding of sluggish BIM adoption by attributing it to the gap between general BIM development and the local, unique BIM use context. Proposing the deployment framework, the study also offers a handy tool for prospective executives to localize BIM and harness its power in their respective organizations and localities.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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