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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Changlong Qi

This rejoinder aims to critique some of the perspectives in Chen’s (2018) study on hospitality and host–guest paradigm in China.

Abstract

Purpose

This rejoinder aims to critique some of the perspectives in Chen’s (2018) study on hospitality and host–guest paradigm in China.

Design/methodology/approach

In this preliminary probe into Chen’s study, critical analysis is performed on Chen’s approaches, whereas document analysis is applied to the relevant ancient Chinese writings. Translations are the author’s own unless indicated otherwise.

Findings

Chen’s views are problematic and supported by patchy evidence. “Hierarchy principle” and “host-centric foundation” do not hold up. In a series of asymmetrical comparisons, Chen goes a bit too far in arguing for uniqueness.

Originality/value

This rejoinder presents valid critiques of Chen’s study, thus directing future research in the right direction. It is of some significance to clarify Chen’s misrepresentations and offer a truer and fuller account of Chinese hospitality, given the difficulty for international scholars to validate Chen’s views because of language barrier and cultural unfamiliarity.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Anna Kaunonen

Three types of industrial buyer-seller relational process models are available: joining theory, stage theory, and state theory. However, historically, these models have…

Abstract

Three types of industrial buyer-seller relational process models are available: joining theory, stage theory, and state theory. However, historically, these models have developed based on the knowledge and cultural context of the Western world. Several researchers note that national culture may have an impact on international industrial buyer-seller relationships. Including culture in the models is highly important, especially as the business environment is increasingly more global and different countries have different business cultures. The goal of this paper is to define the most suitable industrial buyer-seller relational process models for describing relationships in various contexts. The paper includes a through literature review and a single case study in order to reach this objective. A new state theory model evolved during the research. It consists of two beginning states: searching and starting; four purely middles states: constant/static, decline, growth, and troubled; and a purely end state: termination. The state of dormant/inert is both a middle state and an end state, that is, when the relational actors are not in contact does not mean that the relationship has ended, but instead, for example, new legislation may have been implemented, which requires the actors to evaluate their relationship and its future. A relationship goes through the two beginning states in the order mentioned above, but after that, any state may occur.

Details

Advances in Business Marketing & Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-858-7

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Jie Ke

The purpose of this paper is to document an interview with Dr Xiao‐Ping Chen to share her professional and career experience as a management scholar. It shows the path of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document an interview with Dr Xiao‐Ping Chen to share her professional and career experience as a management scholar. It shows the path of her scholarly journey fueled by her love and passion for the profession.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a recent interview with Dr Xiao‐Ping Chen.

Findings

Dr Xiao‐Ping Chen's experience demonstrated the importance of love and passion in one's career pursuit. It shows the importance of the interplays of internal passion and commitment and the external factors in paving and determining a scholar's career success, and how to balance personal life and a demanding role in research, teaching, and professional service.

Research limitations/implications

Dr Chen's career provides an exemplar case for junior scholars to deal with the Chinese transitioning symptom associated with pursuing an academic research career. In particular, Dr Chen's optimistic and persistent way of dealing with difficulties in career and life may inspire junior scholars or those who wish to pursue a career in management research.

Originality/value

The interview profiles a picture of a passionate scholar in management research and offers an inspirational exemplar for the new generation of Chinese HRM researchers.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Daniel L. Chen

I propose a model of behavior in social interactions where individuals maximize a three-term utility function: a conventional consumption utility term and two “social”…

Abstract

I propose a model of behavior in social interactions where individuals maximize a three-term utility function: a conventional consumption utility term and two “social” terms that capture social preference. One social term is a taste for desert, which is maximized when the individual believes the other person is getting what they deserve. The second social term measures the target individuals’ anger or gratitude from the interaction which is determined by a value function derived from prospect theory. After introducing the model and generating a series of comparative statics results and derived predictions, I report the results of a series of quasi-field experiments on social preferences. I discuss how the model explains several paradoxes of empirical moral philosophy that are less explicable by current economic models of social preference focusing on outcomes and intentions.

Details

Experimental Economics and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-819-4

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Abstract

Details

Topics in Analytical Political Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-809-4

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2020

Mahmood Al-khassaweneh and Omar AlShorman

In the big data era, image compression is of significant importance in today’s world. Importantly, compression of large sized images is required for everyday tasks;…

Abstract

In the big data era, image compression is of significant importance in today’s world. Importantly, compression of large sized images is required for everyday tasks; including electronic data communications and internet transactions. However, two important measures should be considered for any compression algorithm: the compression factor and the quality of the decompressed image. In this paper, we use Frei-Chen bases technique and the Modified Run Length Encoding (RLE) to compress images. The Frei-Chen bases technique is applied at the first stage in which the average subspace is applied to each 3 × 3 block. Those blocks with the highest energy are replaced by a single value that represents the average value of the pixels in the corresponding block. Even though Frei-Chen bases technique provides lossy compression, it maintains the main characteristics of the image. Additionally, the Frei-Chen bases technique enhances the compression factor, making it advantageous to use. In the second stage, RLE is applied to further increase the compression factor. The goal of using RLE is to enhance the compression factor without adding any distortion to the resultant decompressed image. Integrating RLE with Frei-Chen bases technique, as described in the proposed algorithm, ensures high quality decompressed images and high compression rate. The results of the proposed algorithms are shown to be comparable in quality and performance with other existing methods.

Details

Applied Computing and Informatics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-1964

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Jie Ke

– This article aims to present the second part of an interview with Dr Xiao-Ping Chen. The focus is on her experience in, and insight on, Chinese management research.

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128

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to present the second part of an interview with Dr Xiao-Ping Chen. The focus is on her experience in, and insight on, Chinese management research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a recent interview with Dr Xiao-Ping Chen.

Findings

Dr Xiao-Ping Chen shared her research experience and insight in the following aspects: identifying topics in Chinese management research, collaborating with Chinese domestic scholars, and approaching a research question or idea to make research fruitful with evolving research agenda on Chinese guanxi. She also shared her insights on exploring new research topics vs following or extending others' ideas, and how the gap between research and practice might be bridged.

Research limitations/implications

Dr Chen's research experience and insights provide an exemplary case for junior scholars to deal with the challenges in conducting and publishing Chinese management research, particularly in how to take an “insider's view” in identifying and engaging in interesting and valuable research.

Originality/value

The interview profiles a picture of a scholar in Chinese management research.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Jie Ke

This purpose of this article is to report the second part of a recent interview with Dr Ming-Jer Chen. He shares his values, beliefs and philosophies on life, business and…

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122

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this article is to report the second part of a recent interview with Dr Ming-Jer Chen. He shares his values, beliefs and philosophies on life, business and scholarship; relates how these philosophies have shaped his approach to teaching, research and service; and outlines his strategies for making important career and professional decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Interview with Dr Ming-Jer Chen.

Findings

Dr Ming-Jer Chen’s firm belief in the Oneness (精一) is reflected in his constant pursuit of “making the world smaller” by closing divides of various kinds. During his career journey, Dr Chen has applied the philosophy of “keeping a balanced and integrated view” to tackle professional and career challenges and reinforced that with the wisdom of his ambicultural perspective. His East–West background and beliefs shape his engagements with the research and business communities and his expertise includes management education and decision-making, as well as teaching, research and professional services.

Research limitations/implications

Dr Chen’s unique life and career experiences make him a role model for those who intend to pursue a career in management research. His ambicultural insight and balanced and integrated perspective may help junior scholars to deal with challenges in their professional lives.

Originality/value

The interview profiles a thought leader and strategist in management research and education, whose experience and wisdom may enlighten junior scholars along their career paths.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Robert Boostrom, Siva K. Balasubramanian and John H. Summey

Researchers often attempt to assess how different features and content will improve the experience of web site users. One assessment technique is to measure the attitude…

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1184

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers often attempt to assess how different features and content will improve the experience of web site users. One assessment technique is to measure the attitude toward the site. A common version of this measure is the Chen and Wells attitude toward the site scale. The purpose of this paper is to determine if there is a difference in performance between that scale and the less used Bruner and Kumar scale so that researchers might use the better of the two related, but different, published scales.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis is done on survey data from an experiment utilizing three different experimental groups that all completed surveys with both the Chen and Wells and the Bruner and Kumar attitude toward the site scales. Scales are assessed for loading and reliability, as well as measures compared for equivalence within groups and used within partial least squares (PLS) models to compare overall model fit.

Findings

In all tests, the Bruner and Kumar scale is better than, or equivalent to, the Chen and Wells scale in each comparison.

Research limitations/implications

The research implication is that the Bruner and Kumar scale would be a better choice when selecting scales for future research projects.

Originality/value

Although Bruner and Kumar had previously performed comparisons of the two scales, in a follow‐up article, this is the first paper to compare the two scales between three different groups and demonstrate how the two different scales would perform within the same conceptual model using PLS structural equation modeling. It will help researchers select the best scale for attitude toward the site.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Jie Ke

The purpose of this article is to report the first part of a recent interview with Dr Ming-Jer Chen. He shares his values, beliefs and philosophies on life, business and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to report the first part of a recent interview with Dr Ming-Jer Chen. He shares his values, beliefs and philosophies on life, business and scholarship, how these philosophies have shaped his approach to teaching, research and service and his strategies for making important career and professional decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on a recent interview with Dr Ming-Jer Chen.

Findings

Dr Ming-Jer Chen's firm belief in the oneness (Fixed graphic 1) is reflected in his constant pursuit of “making the world smaller” by closing divides of various kinds. During his career journey, Dr Chen has applied the philosophy of “keeping a balanced and integrated view” to tackle professional and career challenges with the wisdom of an ambicultural perspective. Practices influenced by his East–West background include management education and decision-making, as well as teaching, research and professional services.

Research limitations/implications

Dr Chen's unique life and career experiences make him a role model for those who intend to pursue a career in management research. His ambicultural insight and the “balanced and integrated view” he applies may help junior scholars in dealing with challenges in their professional lives.

Originality/value

The interview profiles a thought leader and strategist in management research and education, whose experience and wisdom may enlighten junior scholars along their career paths.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

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