Search results

1 – 10 of 96
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Charlotte Carey and Harry Matlay

The aim of this paper is to explore how creative disciplines education is taught, delivered, and assessed, and how this might inform the development of enterprise education UK.

2077

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore how creative disciplines education is taught, delivered, and assessed, and how this might inform the development of enterprise education UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper makes use of empirical data from three main sources across creative disciplines: interviews with entrepreneurs; job adverts for lecturing staff; and a survey of educators. This approach offers multiple perspectives on hypothesis development as well as the validation of emergent result.

Findings

The analysis of the three strands of data highlights the benefits of contextualized enterprise education. It confirms that ideas assessment techniques within creative disciplines are well embedded in practice and applied consistently within the context of an academic framework.

Practical implications

An exploration of delivery styles and ideas assessment in the creative sector has highlighted a potential model which could be adopted by generic enterprise education in business schools and other faculties. Potentially, it offers educators a template for assessment of entrepreneurial ideas.

Originality/value

This paper highlights characteristics of creative discipline education and ideas assessment, which might potentially be a model for teaching enterprise within an academic framework, which could be adopted by enterprise educators.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Charlotte Carey

This chapter explores the role of entrepreneurship within the careers of fine artists. This is positioned within the context of the discourse of cultural value. How…

Abstract

This chapter explores the role of entrepreneurship within the careers of fine artists. This is positioned within the context of the discourse of cultural value. How artists manage their artistic and, sometimes conflicting, entrepreneurial identities is explored. The fields of entrepreneurship, and more recently the creative industries, have received much attention from both policy makers and researchers. Fine artists are perhaps one of the least employable, and arguably most entrepreneurial (by necessity), as Higgs et al. suggest ‘some occupations naturally have substantially higher numbers of self-employed people such as “Artists” with 91% self-employment’ (Higgs, Cunningham, & Bakhshi, 2008, p. 94).

The study captures the career histories of a cohort of fine art graduates, all of whom had graduated at the same time (1994), from the same institution. Taking a narrative approach, detailed career stories were obtained. The relationship to and tensions surrounding entrepreneurship and artistic practice were explored in detail. While artistic identity emerges as a strong force for this group, artistic identity and entrepreneurial identity are sometimes at odds with each other. The practicalities of making a living as an artist, arguably, call for entrepreneurial activity. However, the findings suggest that this presents a conflict for some artists, both aesthetically and emotionally. This chapter explores what this means in the context of cultural value, and cultural value as a ‘lens’ for understanding an artist's career.

Details

Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Charlotte Carey and Annette Naudin

This paper seeks to report on the current state and attitudes towards Enterprise Curriculum within higher education (HE) for the creative industries sector. It is based on…

3099

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report on the current state and attitudes towards Enterprise Curriculum within higher education (HE) for the creative industries sector. It is based on preliminary findings from the Creative Enterprise Conference (2006) held at UCE Birmingham, which examined the role of HEs in developing future entrepreneurs in this important sector of the UK economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores issues related to enterprise curriculum development in HE through in‐depth qualitative analysis of plenary sessions, focused discussions and workshops. A number of stakeholders, including policy makers, academics, researchers and practitioners were invited to explore relevant issues appertaining to “creative enterprises” in the UK.

Findings

This paper presents a critical evaluation of the growing specialist literature, activity and research in creative industries, notably: research needs, paucity of pedagogical materials, characteristics of “creative entrepreneurs” as well as how, when, where and in what way should “creative” students be taught about entrepreneurship and self‐employment.

Practical implications

The study offers stakeholders a critical perspective on current attitudes and practices within creative industries. This paper offers interested parties an opportunity to consider and reflect on how HE can develop relevant curriculum and deliver enterprise education that is pertinent to students who intend to operate in this important sector of economic activity.

Originality/value

By capturing current attitudes and good practice in creative industries, this paper emphasises enterprise curriculum development and implementation in a relatively underdeveloped aspect of educational research. It makes tentative suggestions and recommendations on how HE and policy makers might respond to current and future enterprise education needs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Charlotte Carey, Kelly Smith and Lynn M. Martin

The purpose of this study is to explore the views of partners as to the process and operation of TE3 in relation to community of practice (CoP) principles in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the views of partners as to the process and operation of TE3 in relation to community of practice (CoP) principles in order to identify success factors fundamental to continued active participation in and promotion of enterprise education.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a narrative methodology via semi‐structured interviews. The aim was to capture both positive and negative perceptions of involvement from key partners within the project. A manual thematic approach was taken to analyse the data collected and through this common threads, trends and issues were identified.

Findings

The findings of this paper focus on the nature, benefits and power of this unique cross‐university collaboration, in facilitating and stimulating enterprising and entrepreneurial activity amongst students, graduates, and potentially, local small to medium‐sized enterprises.

Practical implications

These findings are set within the context of delivering some key policy‐driven objectives, i.e. to support and create not only future entrepreneurs, but also enterprising groups and individuals, and to increase the use of technology‐enhanced and blended learning throughout higher education. It will be of interest to individuals and educators working in those areas and to policymakers seeking new routes to develop an entrepreneurial culture.

Originality/value

This is a unique project in terms of multiple university partners collaborating on third stream activity. The findings of this evaluation and its approach add to this otherwise scarce and under researched territory.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Harry Matlay and Charlotte Carey

This paper sets out to critically evaluate contemporary entrepreneurship education initiatives in the UK. The authors seek to compare and contrast various entrepreneurship…

4506

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to critically evaluate contemporary entrepreneurship education initiatives in the UK. The authors seek to compare and contrast various entrepreneurship education methods, approaches and curricula as well as relevant outcomes, in the UK context.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal case studies were used, over a ten‐year period (1995‐2004), to analyse in‐depth qualitative data relating to the development and implementation of various approaches to entrepreneurship education, in a sample of 40 new and established universities in the UK.

Findings

A number of interesting findings have emerged from this longitudinal study. It appears that conceptual and contextual as well as design and delivery factors can impact significantly upon entrepreneurship education courses developed in UK HEIs. Furthermore, a number of actual and perceived barriers needed to be overcome or mitigated in order to facilitate a better understanding of stakeholder needs and contributions.

Practical implications

Measuring the outcomes of entrepreneurship education in the UK is still proving ellusive. This study provides a longitudinal overview of current entrepreneurship education initiatives in order to gain a better understanding of the scope and limitations of this type of educational programme.

Originality/value

This paper presents an empirically rigorous, longitudinal case study approach to a rapidly growing aspect of higher education in the UK. The richness of the emergent data offers a valuable insight into pertinent aspects of entrepreneurship education and stakeholder needs and contributions.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Abstract

Details

Global Migration, Entrepreneurship and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-097-7

Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Xiping Shinnie, Thomas Domboka and Charlotte Carey

The conceptual framework of Multicultural Hybridism is adopted to reflect the emerging themes of transnationalism and superdiversity in the context of ethnic minority…

Abstract

The conceptual framework of Multicultural Hybridism is adopted to reflect the emerging themes of transnationalism and superdiversity in the context of ethnic minority migrant entrepreneurs breaking out of their ethnic enclaves into mainstream economy. It is constructed as an extension of Mixed Embeddedness theory (Kloosterman, 2006), given that ‘Multicultural Hybrid’ (Arrighetti, Daniela Bolzani, & Lasagni, 2014) firms display stronger resilience with a higher survival rate than enclaved businesses (Kloosterman, Rusinovic, & Yeboah, 2016). With further integration of incremental diversification typology (Lassalle & Scott, 2018), the current study adopts Multicultural Hybridism as a lens to explore the opportunity recognition capabilities of transnational, migrant entrepreneurs who are facilitated by the hybridity of opportunity recognition (Lassalle, 2018) from linking host-country and home-country cultures. The hybridity of opportunity recognition focuses on access to markets and resources between transnational ethnic and local multicultural mainstream markets. Through the theoretical lens of Multicultural Hybridism, interviews with 16 Birmingham-based Chinese migrant entrepreneurs have been analysed to shape a dynamic understanding of the multifaceted concept of breakout in a superdiverse and transnational context. The multilayered interpretation of breakout provides an enhanced understanding of the diversity of hybridism between transnational ethnic and local multicultural mainstream markets. This is seen from the perspectives of firm growth and social integration in the current locations and future spaces of transnational migrant entrepreneurs. It goes beyond the narrow imagination of breakout as an economic assimilation process, avoiding the singular conceptualisation of the host-country mainstream market as the only breakout destination for transnational ethnic entrepreneurs.

Details

Global Migration, Entrepreneurship and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-097-7

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

Abstract

Details

Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

1 – 10 of 96