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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2023

Sang Bong Lee, Shih-Hao Liu, Carl P. Maertz, Nitish Singh and James Fisher

This study aims to identify different antecedents and reveal divergent moderating effects of horizontal collectivism, thereby unlocking the asymmetric mechanisms for employees’…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify different antecedents and reveal divergent moderating effects of horizontal collectivism, thereby unlocking the asymmetric mechanisms for employees’ brand citizenship behavior (BCB) and negative word-of-mouth (NWOM).

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey data set and analyzes it with structural equation modeling along with common latent factor analysis designed to control for common method variance.

Findings

BCB is associated with pride at work but not perceived organizational support (POS), so POS drives BCB not directly but indirectly through the emotion of pride at work. In contrast, employees’ NWOM is associated with both POS and frustration, and POS drives NWOM directly and indirectly through the emotion of frustration. Horizontal collectivism has divergent moderating effects that strengthen the relationships of BCB with POS and pride at work and weaken the relationship between employees’ NWOM and frustration.

Originality/value

This study makes two major theoretical contributions to internal branding. First, as a response to the need for an investigation into drivers of employees’ brand-oriented behaviors, it will identify different psychological antecedents and mechanisms for BCB and employees’ NWOM. Second, capturing the potential of horizontal collectivism on employees’ brand-oriented behaviors, this study will reveal the potential divergent moderating effects of horizontal collectivism on BCB and employees’ NWOM. These two contributions will lead to a better understanding of the different mechanisms for employees’ BCB and NWOM.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Scott L. Boyar, Charles M. Carson, Donald C. Mosley, Carl P. Maertz and Allison W. Pearson

The purpose of the current paper is to continue assessment of the construct and predictive validity of the Netemeyer et al. Work Family Conflict (WFC) and Family Work Conflict…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current paper is to continue assessment of the construct and predictive validity of the Netemeyer et al. Work Family Conflict (WFC) and Family Work Conflict (FWC) scales while reassessing the scales for possible improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from workers in a poultry processing plant to reassess Netemeyer et al.'s WFC and FWC scales. Carlson et al. were unable to include Netemeyer et al.'s items in constructing and validating their new measures of WFC and FWC. This paper assesses and extends the validation of the Netemeyer et al. scales.

Findings

This study supports the notion that a reduced model of both scales (four items for WFC and three items for FWC) fit the data in the sample better than the original five‐item measures presented by Netemeyer et al. By deleting items from each scale more variation in the constructs was accounted for and reduced unexplained error. By clarifying the measurement of WFC and FWC, the substantive predictive model in the paper was supported. In addition, both WFC and FWC predicted individuals' intention to quit, indicating potential predictive validity for these modified scales.

Originality/value

While this is a reassessment of a previously used scale, the improvements in functionality (decreased items needed for assessment) and potential for predictive validity of the modified scales result in an exciting new avenue for WFC and FWC research.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Scott L. Boyar, Carl P. Maertz, Donald C. Mosley and Jon C. Carr

The current study seeks to argue that the constructs of work demand and family demand have been neglected in the work‐family conflict (WFC) literature. The authors aim to help…

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Abstract

Purpose

The current study seeks to argue that the constructs of work demand and family demand have been neglected in the work‐family conflict (WFC) literature. The authors aim to help clarify the definition and utilize direct measures of perceived work and family demand to test main effect, mediated, and interactive hypotheses.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 698 university employees participated in a comprehensive computer survey that considered various manifest indicators and multiple scales across work and family domains. Moderator hierarchical regression and LISREL 8.0 were used in analyzing the data.

Findings

The results indicate that both forms of demand have significant direct effects on work interfering with family (WIF) and family interfering with work (FIW). Both demand constructs partially mediate the effects of three categories of domain variables on the two forms of conflict. Finally, the work demand‐WIF relationship is found to be stronger for those with relatively high family centrality.

Research limitations/implications

A cross‐sectional design was used and may be problematic when examining relationships that occur over time. Further, capturing all scales with a single survey could result in common method bias, which may have inflated the predictive relationships.

Practical implications

Organizations can work to reduce WFC by adopting family‐friendly programs that help employees balance work and family demands. Specifically, this study implies that organizations should find ways to hold constant or reduce perceptions of work and family demand, along with other direct antecedents of WIF and FIW.

Originality/value

This study provides a relatively comprehensive model of antecedents that can be useful in future research. The authors also examine interactive effects of demand and work‐family centrality on conflict using direct measures of perceived demand. Methodologically, the research improves on some past studies by measuring perceived demand directly and by not narrowing our sample to employees who are married or those with children. Hopefully, these contributions will help stimulate continued growth in the work‐family literature.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Scott L. Boyar, Reimara Valk, Carl P. Maertz and Ranjan Sinha

The purpose of this paper is to develop turnover reasons and assess their importance for various family role configurations. Specifically, the authors were interested in whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop turnover reasons and assess their importance for various family role configurations. Specifically, the authors were interested in whether high levels of family financial obligation related to family‐related turnover reasons and whether low levels of family financial obligation related to job‐related turnover reasons.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used both qualitative and quantitative methods to develop and test the turnover reasons; this involved conducting interviews and pilot testing the turnover items, which were evaluated with factor analysis. The main study was analyzed using MANOVA.

Findings

The authors developed six turnover reasons that help explain why individuals were leaving their jobs. It was also found that employees with relatively low financial obligation were more likely to leave the organization because of lack of managerial support, job content and high levels of work‐related stress.

Research limitations/implications

The measures in this study were cross‐sectional, participants were employees in the information technology/business process outsourcing (IT/BPO) sector, and the study included a single‐country. Future studies can focus on multiple industries and countries and use objective variables in determining key relationships.

Practical implications

The study's results show the major reasons for turnover, both at an individual and organizational level, which include managerial support, job content and work‐related stress; each was particularly significant for those married without children in a dual‐earner situation.

Originality/value

The paper contributes by examining, for the first time, the relationships between family demographic profiles and turnover reasons for Indian IT/BPO workers.

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Carl P. Maertz Jr, Philipp A. Stoeberl and Jill Marks

“What kinds of internships are possible?” “How should we decide whether to utilize internships, and if so, how can we ensure they will pay off?” The purpose of this paper is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

“What kinds of internships are possible?” “How should we decide whether to utilize internships, and if so, how can we ensure they will pay off?” The purpose of this paper is to help answer these key questions facing talent management professionals, educators, and interns.

Design/methodology/approach

This is achieved by reviewing the scattered literature to distill the lessons regarding internships for each of these stakeholders. First, the paper better defines internships through enumerating 11 key dimensions, helping give all internship stakeholders a common language to clarify communication. Second, the paper synthesizes and lists the potential benefits and costs/pitfalls of internships for interns, schools, and employers to provide a fuller view of internships from all stakeholder perspectives. Third, the paper summarizes recommendations to help stakeholders maximize the actual benefits obtained from internships while minimizing the costs and avoiding common pitfalls.

Findings

Many benefits for interns have been identified in the literature. These can be categorized as job-related benefits, career-related benefits, and networking/job market benefits. For most interns, the costs of the internship are minimal. Nevertheless, potential pitfalls stem from the fact that employers and interns often do not have consistent or shared expectations regarding the internship. The benefits of internships for schools can be significant. These include filling an important modern need for experiential and vocational learning. For employers, hiring an intern for a full-time position after the assignment can lead to savings in the areas of recruitment and selection.

Originality/value

The paper provides stakeholders with “one-stop shopping” for the best general advice about creating and growing successful internships.

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Bruno Cirillo, Daniel Tzabbar and Donghwi Seo

Research on employee mobility has proliferated in the past four decades across four research traditions: Economics, sociology, management, and organizational behavior/human

Abstract

Research on employee mobility has proliferated in the past four decades across four research traditions: Economics, sociology, management, and organizational behavior/human resource management. Despite significant overlap in interest and focus, these four streams of research have evolved independent from each other, resulting in a structural divide. We provide a detailed account of the research on employee mobility and the structural divide across disciplines. We document that the payoff from this profusion of research and increasing interest has been disappointing, as reflected in the limited number of cross-disciplinary citations, even among common topics of interest. However, our analysis also provides some encouraging signs in the form of specific journals and individuals who provide a bridge for cross-disciplinary fertilization.

Details

Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-550-5

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Sang Bong Lee, Shih Hao Liu and Carl Maertz

With the emergence of a variety of communication channels on social media, employees have more opportunities to engage with external stakeholders for or against their…

Abstract

Purpose

With the emergence of a variety of communication channels on social media, employees have more opportunities to engage with external stakeholders for or against their organizational brand. In such a context, focusing on negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) as an employee’s negative discretionary brand-oriented behavior, the current study aimed to identify negative emotions that can serve as drivers for NWOM more strongly than for counterproductive workplace behavior (CWB), relying on the discrete emotion perspective. This study also aimed to examine whether employees’ perceived brand knowledge can directly diminish employees’ NWOM and CWB and attenuate the influence of negative emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to gather relevant data, which were analyzed by structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings showed that anger was more strongly associated with employees’ NWOM than withdrawal and that envy was more strongly associated with CWB toward individuals than employees’ NWOM. Employees’ perceived brand knowledge was negatively associated with both NWOM and CWB directly and mitigated the association of negative emotions such as anger and envy with CWB, but not with NWOM.

Originality/value

Based on the discrete emotion perspective, the current study explored the relative magnitude of emotional antecedents for employees’ NWOM and conventional CWB. Also, it expanded the previous findings on the positive effects of perceived brand knowledge on the positive outcomes of employees’ actions and its mitigating effects on NWOM and CWB.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Susan Frelich Appleton and Susan Ekberg Stiritz

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation…

Abstract

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation of a transdisciplinary course, entitled “Regulating Sex: Historical and Cultural Encounters,” in which students mined literature for social critique, became immersed in the study of law and its limits, and developed increased sensitivity to power, its uses, and abuses. The paper demonstrates the value theoretically and pedagogically of third-wave feminisms, wild zones, and contact zones as analytic constructs and contends that including sex and sexualities in conversations transforms personal experience, education, society, and culture, including law.

Details

Special Issue: Feminist Legal Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-782-0

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Stephen Turner

Abstract

Details

Mad Hazard
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-670-7

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2023

Limor Kessler Ladelsky and Thomas William Lee

This paper aims to examine whether information technology (IT) managers’ virtual listening, as rated by their high-tech employees, affected turnover behaviour beyond a new…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether information technology (IT) managers’ virtual listening, as rated by their high-tech employees, affected turnover behaviour beyond a new constellation of variables, some of which have never been researched as antecedents of turnover behaviour, particularly during a pandemic or crisis. Namely, the main aim, among others, is to answer the research question: does IT employees’ perception of the quality of their supervisors’ virtual listening in the pandemic and crisis era, when employees and managers work remotely, will negatively affect turnover behaviour? If yes, in which constellation of antecedents the virtual listening effecting on turnover behaviour?

Design/methodology/approach

Logistic regression analysis was conducted to test the hypotheses via SPSS 26 and PROCESS (Model 6). The variance inflation factor was calculated to test multicollinearity. Interaction was tested using the Hayes and Preacher PROCESS macro model. The researchers also used the J-N technique test (Johnson–Neyman via process). The supplemental analysis used also PROCESS MACRO (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA, 2023) Model 4 and Bootstrap test.

Findings

The findings show that perceptions of supervisors’ virtual listening quality as rated by their employees moderated the relationship between organisational deviance as a type of organisational misbehaviour (OMB) and turnover behaviour and had the strongest effect on turnover behaviour beyond other key predictors (organisational deviance as a type of misbehaviour, turnover intention, job satisfaction, embeddedness and alternatives in the labour market). Alternatives to current work moderated the association between the perception of managers’ virtual listening behaviour as rated by their employees and turnover behaviour. Specifically, when alternatives in the labour market were high or medium, the perceived quality of managers’ virtual listening reduced turnover behaviour. Finally, the perception of the IT employees supervisors’ virtual listening moderated the relationship between organisational deviance and turnover intention among high-tech employees.

Originality/value

Evaluating supervisor listening in the high-tech firm may have value in terms of its relationship to outcomes such as retaining employees, turnover intention and especially turnover behaviour. The effect on turnover behaviour and of that new constellation of antecedents on turnover behaviour when people work remotely was not researched yet and important for the post COVID-19 era. Additionally, in contrast to most studies of turnover, this study also focus on the positive aspects of turnover and especially turnover behaviour to organisations in general and especially to high-tech firm and not just the negative aspect as was researched until now. Another contribution is the finding that when employees perceived their managers’ virtual listening quality as high, the effect of deviance as a type of OMB on turnover behaviour was positive. Namely, the listening as a moderator and turnover assisted in making the organisation cleaner from inappropriate behaviour. Additionally, when alternatives in the labour market are high or medium, perceived quality of virtual listening of managers as rated by their employees can reduce turnover behaviour. This virtual listening–turnover relationship and the moderator of alternatives to current work had not previously been found in the turnover literature and this is also significant a contribution to the turnover and withdrawal literature.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

1 – 10 of 12