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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Fiona Donald, Cameron Duff, Katherine Lawrence, Jillian Broadbear and Sathya Rao

Recovery is an important concept within mental healthcare policy. There is a growing expectation that clinicians adopt approaches that align with the recovery principles, despite…

Abstract

Purpose

Recovery is an important concept within mental healthcare policy. There is a growing expectation that clinicians adopt approaches that align with the recovery principles, despite significant disagreements about what recovery-oriented interventions might look like in practice. It is also unclear how recovery may be relevant to personality disorder. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 16 clinicians were interviewed at two mental health services in Melbourne, Australia. These clinicians had specialist training and experience in the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and provided insight regarding the meaning and relevance of the recovery paradigm in the context of BPD. Thematic analysis within a grounded theory approach was used to understand key themes identified from the interview data.

Findings

Thematic analysis suggested that clinicians understand recovery in three distinct ways: as moving towards a satisfying and meaningful life, as different ways of relating to oneself and as remission of symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning. Clinicians also identified ways in which recovery-related interventions in current use were problematic for individuals diagnosed with BPD. Different approaches that may better support recovery were discussed. This study suggests that practices supporting recovery in BPD may need to be tailored to individuals with BPD, with a focus on cultivating agency while acknowledging the creative nature of recovery.

Originality/value

Clinicians are in a strong position to observe recovery. Their insights suggest key refinements that will enhance the ways in which recovery in BPD is conceptualized and can be promoted.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2024

Julian Waters-Lynch and Cameron Duff

The purpose of this study is to reflect on and analyse the sensory experiences related to the transition to remote work during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to reflect on and analyse the sensory experiences related to the transition to remote work during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research seeks to understand how these experiences have influenced the integration of work practices into home and family life and the subsequent adaptations and embodied learning that arise in response.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' research approach incorporates autoethnographic methods to explore the sensory, affective and emotional experiences of transitioning to remote work. The authors draw on principles of embodied learning, as influenced by Gilles Deleuze, and utilise a range of ethnographic tools including note-taking, audio memos, photography, shared conversations and written reflections to gather their data.

Findings

The study illuminates the ways bodies learn to accommodate the new organisational contexts that arise when the spaces, affects and forces of home and work intersect. It demonstrates how the integration of work into the private domain resulted in new affective and material arrangements, involving novel sensory experiences and substantial embodied learning.

Originality/value

This study provides a distinct, sensory-oriented perspective on the challenges and transformations of remote work practices amid the pandemic. By focussing on the affective resonances and embodied learning that emerge in this context, it contributes to the emerging discourse around post-lockdown work practices and remote work in general.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Fiona Donald, Cameron Duff, Jillian Broadbear, Sathya Rao and Katherine Lawrence

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex condition characterized by a number of psychosocial difficulties that typically involve considerable suffering for individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex condition characterized by a number of psychosocial difficulties that typically involve considerable suffering for individuals with the condition. Recovery from BPD may involve specific processes such as work on how the self is perceived by the individual with BPD and his or her relationships which differ from those common to recovery from other mental health conditions. The details of the processes that may best promote changes within the self and relationships are yet to be established. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 17 consumers from a specialist BPD service were interviewed to identify factors they have experienced that contribute to recovery from BPD. Thematic analysis within a grounded theory framework was used to understand key themes within the interview data. The emphasis was on specific conditions of change rather than the more global goals for recovery suggested by recent models.

Findings

Key themes identified included five conditions of change: support from others; accepting the need for change; working on trauma without blaming oneself; curiosity about oneself; and reflecting on one’s behavior. To apply these conditions of change more broadly, clinicians working in the BPD field need to support processes that promote BPD-specific recovery identified by consumers rather than focusing exclusively on the more general recovery principles previously identified within the literature.

Originality/value

The specific factors identified by consumers as supporting recovery in BPD are significant because they involve specific skills or attitudes rather than aspirations or goals. These specific skills may be constructively supported in clinical practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Nayanthara De Silva and P.L.I. Wimalaratne

This study attempts to identify a simple and efficient framework to be implemented in the Sri Lankan construction industry to inculcate a “safe and healthy” working environment…

2757

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to identify a simple and efficient framework to be implemented in the Sri Lankan construction industry to inculcate a “safe and healthy” working environment for its workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

The occupational safety and health (OSH) management strategies that could be implemented in the construction sites were identified through a comprehensive literature survey and a pilot survey. A questionnaire survey was carried out among the safety and health (S&H) experts to explore the most effective OSH management strategies and thereafter to derive OSH mechanisms to promote the safer and healthy environment in the construction sites. Success of these mechanisms in the local industry was analyzed and was subsequently used to develop the OSH management framework.

Findings

A total of 35 significant OSH management strategies, unsafe and unhealthy factors as risk factors for fatal and non‐fatal situations were identified. A further ten OSH management mechanisms were established as adequate safety supervision, site environment, controlling the workers' safe and healthy behaviour, centralized OSH management unit, resources and insurance policies, management commitment, supportive devices, OSH documentation, OSH education and awareness, and OSH committee. Further, these ten mechanisms were used to establish the OSH framework to be implemented in Sri Lankan construction sites.

Originality/value

OSH management in the Sri Lankan construction industry can be enhanced by implementing the proposed OSH management framework.

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Iain Cameron, Billy Hare and Roy Duff

– Present findings from a UK study, funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), on the relationship between safety advisor roles and safety performance.

2257

Abstract

Purpose

Present findings from a UK study, funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), on the relationship between safety advisor roles and safety performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Roles and organisational factors for contractors’ safety advisors (independent variables) were derived from existing literature. The dependent variable was “safety performance”, measured by accident incidence rate (AIR). Data were provided by 101 contractors and variance of means analysis was conducted.

Findings

Contractors using only external safety consultants had an average AIR approximately three times those with internal safety staff. However, simply increasing internal safety personnel did not lead to increased safety performance. Contractors, where at least one safety advisor had authority to give orders had a lower mean AIR than those who did not. Other significant variables were: delivering safety training to employees; vetting sub-contractors; and the inclusion of an environmental management role.

Practical implications

Employing at least one full-time internal safety person is better than relying solely on a safety consultant. If these safety advisers report to senior management then they have a greater chance of influencing others to act safely or commit resources to manage safety. Delivery of training, vetting sub-contractors and including environmental duties should feature in safety advisor roles.

Originality/value

The assumption that merely increasing safety personnel improves safety has been challenged. It is apparent from these findings that what the safety personnel actually do is more important than how many are employed. This is a major finding in relation to theory and practice which challenges previous research.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Ingrid Walker

Critical drug studies have developed a significant body of work that illuminates understanding of gender and drug use as well as drug pleasures. However, framing the study of…

Abstract

Critical drug studies have developed a significant body of work that illuminates understanding of gender and drug use as well as drug pleasures. However, framing the study of women and their drug pleasures through critical drug studies presents potential limitations. The posthuman turn de-emphasises the primary goal of drug use: a particular subjective experience. Both the language and theoretical frameworks of new materialism potentially distance researchers, as interlocutors, from engaging the human experience of drug pleasures, rendering drug use abstract and unknowable.

In a historical context in which women’s intoxication has invoked shaming and criminalisation, control of their bodies, and silencing of dissent, scholarly activism by and inclusion of women who use drugs should be foundational to critical drug studies. Autoethnography offers a modality by which personal narrative becomes a convention of academic writing. It also presents a way of performing the self critically and authentically within conceptual frameworks that explore the complex, intersectional politics of women’s drug use, ways that are representationally missing in the scholarship. An ethics of care as part of one’s practice of the self proposes a radically different way of framing drug use. The recognition and normalisation of drug pleasures as the complicated, emergent, expressions of ethical self-care that they are for women (and all people who use drugs) promises fertile ground for future scholarly exploration. Research based in the lived experience of women who use drugs will help establish languages that resituate drug use in the phenomenology of their experience.

Details

The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Billy Hare and Iain Cameron

This paper aims to report on the findings from a research project, commissioned by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE), investigating the integration of health and safety…

3395

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the findings from a research project, commissioned by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE), investigating the integration of health and safety (H&S) with construction planning.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of group and individual interviews were undertaken with qualitative methods of analysis to develop an integrated process model.

Findings

The model developed uses “Gateway” decision points, which allows flexibility and the early integration of H&S at a strategic level, although detailed planning is still required through the use of integrated management tools.

Practical implications

This study will help practitioners who wish to integrate CDM principles using a process model. It has also informed the HSE with policy decisions for their review of the Construction Design and Management Regulations 1994.

Originality/value

Previous research on construction H&S has tended to concentrate on site management. This study extends knowledge and understanding of how H&S can be integrated at the planning stage of projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Billy Hare and Iain Cameron

This paper aims to present findings on research funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) on factors contributing to superior safety performance amongst…

3167

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present findings on research funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) on factors contributing to superior safety performance amongst construction firms in the UK – specifically, the level of training received by site managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 100 construction firms provided details of the type and duration of health and safety (H&S) training received by their site managers. This was analysed against a three point scale: up to two days training; the Site Managers Safety Training Scheme (SMSTS) five days training; and, National/Scottish Vocational Qualification for H&S – Level 3 or above. This was cross‐tabulated with their Accident Incidence Rate (AIR).

Findings

The results were as follows: up to two days training gave a mean AIR=1825; SMSTS mean AIR=1566; N/SVQ 3 or above mean AIR=211. This shows that increased durations of training are associated with lower accident rates. If duration is accepted as a measure of “level” of training then the findings support the hypothesis that increased levels of training lead to increased safety performance.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was skewed with over 70 per cent having accident rates lower than the industry average. This is common in such studies and is difficult to control without losing data. It also meant non‐parametric tests were used. The findings cannot be reliably extended to organisations with turnover less than £4m.

Practical implications

These findings add a new dimension to previous studies that have generally compared the mere presence, or otherwise, of training with safety performance.

Originality/value

The paper establishes a baseline in relation to the minimum level of H&S training for site managers as well as providing evidence for increased investment to achieve superior performance.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Richard Fellows

The purpose of this paper is to review aspects of innovation, research and development paradigms and paradigmatic changes which have occurred in construction over recent years.

2012

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review aspects of innovation, research and development paradigms and paradigmatic changes which have occurred in construction over recent years.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach combines reviewing literature and some theory within the context of the author's experiences as a participant in the construction industry and associated research and education.

Findings

The paper concludes that much has been re‐cycled, often under amended titles. There is notable scope and advisability in paradigm shifts from reductionist/determinist approaches to stochastic approaches which accommodate complexities of interdependencies plus moves from “hard” positivism to “softer” constructivist perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited in validity and reliability due to the methods employed. However, the conclusion does stress the essential of researchers being aware of and articulating the limitations of their work; the need for sound theoretical foundations is stressed in regard to both topics and methods.

Practical implications

Proper examinations of research, including ontologies, epistemologies, validities and reliabilities, as well as the topics under investigation, promotes good research and its application and avoids recycling of “popular” topics in periodically amended guises.

Originality/value

The paper expresses the author's original views, developed over a quite extensive and varied career; however, it expresses views held fairly widely but seldom expressed beyond “closed doors”.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Ronald McCaffer

206

Abstract

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

1 – 10 of 129