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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Subhasish Dutta and J. Ajith Kumar

Previous research has investigated knowledge transfer and the external consultant's role in it, during enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation. In this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has investigated knowledge transfer and the external consultant's role in it, during enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation. In this study, the authors explore the processes through which knowledge creation happens during ERP implementation and how external consultants help operationalize the same.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors engaged the SECI model of the theory of organizational knowledge creation and conducted an interpretive study that interviewed 14 ERP implementation experts in India. The interviews were transcribed and then analyzed using the ATLAS.ti package.

Findings

The findings reveal fine insights into how knowledge creation takes place during ERP implementation through the four modes of knowledge conversion – socialization (S), externalization (E), combination (C) and internalization (I). The external consultants aid in operationalizing this knowledge creation process through five types of knowledge-related activities: (I) importing external knowledge, (D) discovering internal knowledge, (E) extricating confined knowledge, (A) activating flows of knowledge and (S) solving problems using knowledge. These activities can be represented by the acronym, I-D-E-A-S.

Originality/value

The study makes two overarching contributions: (1) offering an interpretation and description of ERP implementation as a knowledge creation process and (2) extending the understanding of the external consultants' role during ERP implementation to include new knowledge creation.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

John Chelliah and Douglas Davis

The purpose of this study is to confirm the existence of PE and the role it plays from the perspective of management consultants. One of the greatest challenges facing

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2705

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to confirm the existence of PE and the role it plays from the perspective of management consultants. One of the greatest challenges facing management consultants today is how to win business through satisfying client needs. There are a number of authors who have identified that meeting clients' unwritten and unspoken expectations i.e. psychological expectations (PE), can yield competitive advantage for consultants. However, there is a dearth of research in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi structured interviews were carried out with twenty management consultants in Australia. Questions canvassed their views on the existence of PE, the forms it took and its strategic value in client‐consultant relationships.

Findings

Types of PE identified in literature were found to exist widely in practice. Consultants were very aware of PE and the importance of addressing them. Benefits of meeting PE reported were additional business with existing clients or referrals by satisfied clients to other clients. Some PE presented an ethical dilemma to consultants and in some cases they would rather walk away from assignments which they deem as unethical.

Originality/value

The paper showed that the strategic importance placed on PE by practitioner literature is worthy of focus. Through this research, it has been established for the first time that psychological expectations impact upon the success of the client‐consultant relationship from the viewpoint of consultants.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1980

Andrew Kakabadse

This study is an analysis of client‐consultant relationships centered around a large capital project, specifically in planning to build a self contained steel production…

Abstract

This study is an analysis of client‐consultant relationships centered around a large capital project, specifically in planning to build a self contained steel production plant in a country on the North African coast. The total contract value was £350m ($800m approximately). A number of consultants bidded for the project and the contract was given to two companies, both based in Europe but of different nationalities. Two products were required from the consultants, an engineering systems plan for the total steel plant and a manpower plan assessing labour requirements, training needs and an analysis of individual jobs and hierarchical roles. Relatively few problems were experienced in the drafting of the engineering plan. The point at issue centered over the manpower plan.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Jan A. De Jong and Ilse M. Van Eekelen

Although much has been written on skills and strategies of management consultants, little research has been done on what management consultants actually do. In this…

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4569

Abstract

Although much has been written on skills and strategies of management consultants, little research has been done on what management consultants actually do. In this study, three senior consultants were shadowed, each for a one week period. Management consultancy turns out to be a hectic and highly interactive job. Important interaction partners are clients, colleagues, and secretaries, although only the first are highlighted in literature. Catalytic intervention is the most dominant approach in client contacts. The relatively rare desk work sessions of management consultants are even more interrupted than those of managers. An important function of their desk work (and of their work as a whole) is structuring information gained in client contacts.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Ernestine Ndzi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of advice that the remuneration consultants offer to the companies on executive pay. It explores how the advice…

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691

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of advice that the remuneration consultants offer to the companies on executive pay. It explores how the advice offered affects the level of executive remuneration. Furthermore, it investigates whether the nature of advice offered forms part of the reasons why remuneration consultants have been criticised to be correlated with high executive pay.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analysis the data obtained from interviewing remuneration consultants from prominent consultancy firms that operate in the UK and the USA.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that remuneration consultants’ advice on executive remuneration is not always objective. The nature of advice depends on whether the consultants have a balance of portfolio of companies (self-interest) or whether they have the courage to stand up to confrontations from the executives (fear of executives). This study shows that the purpose of using remuneration consultants in advising on executive remuneration is defeated. Also, the practice pushes up pay levels.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on large consultancy firm operating in the UK and/or the USA. Access to the participants was very difficult due to their busy schedules.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates the effect that lack of best practice on benchmarking is partly responsible for the high executive pay levels.

Social implications

This paper will inform companies on the nature of advice that remuneration consultant’s offer and its effect on pay levels. Secondly, it will provide the shareholders with vital information they require to vote on remuneration policy in the annual general meeting.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the effect that lack of best practice on benchmarking is partly responsible for the high executive pay levels. This paper will inform companies on the nature of advice that remuneration consultant’s offer and its effect on pay levels. Secondly, it will provide the shareholders with vital information they require to vote on remuneration policy in the annual general meeting. Lastly, it informs policymakers on the grey areas of practice that requires best practice.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Sherif Shawer, Shirley Rowbotham, Alexander Heazell, Teresa Kelly and Sarah Vause

Many organisations, including the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, have recommended increasing the number of hours of consultant obstetric presence in UK…

Abstract

Purpose

Many organisations, including the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, have recommended increasing the number of hours of consultant obstetric presence in UK National Health Service maternity units to improve patient care. St Mary’s Hospital, Manchester implemented 24-7 consultant presence in September 2014. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the impact of 24-7 consultant presence upon women and babies, a retrospective review of all serious clinical intrapartum incidents occurring between September 2011 and September 2017 was carried out by two independent reviewers; disagreements in classification were reviewed by a senior Obstetrician. The impact of consultant presence was classified in a structure agreed a priori.

Findings

A total of 72 incidents were reviewed. Consultants were directly involved in the care of 75.6 per cent of cases before 24-7 consultant presence compared to 96.8 per cent afterwards. Negative impact due to a lack of consultant presence fell from 22 per cent of the incidents before 24-7 consultant presence to 9.7 per cent after implementation. In contrast, positive impact of consultant presence increased from 14.6 to 32.3 per cent following the introduction of 24-7 consultant presence.

Practical implications

Introduction of 24-7 consultant presence reduced the negative impact caused by a lack of, or delay in, consultant presence as identified by serious untoward incident (SUI) reviews. Consultant presence was more likely to have a positive influence on care delivery.

Originality/value

This is the first assessment of the impact of 24-7 consultant presence on the SUIs in obstetrics.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Carol A. Berger

This article challenges the notion that using a consultant is a luxury inappropriate in the library community. A consultant can offer access to hard‐to‐find information…

Abstract

This article challenges the notion that using a consultant is a luxury inappropriate in the library community. A consultant can offer access to hard‐to‐find information, an impartial viewpoint, flexible arrangements, and timely completion of a project. Using a consultant can therefore mean sounder decisions, cost savings, and enhanced effectiveness for the library. The author discusses specialized consulting services available to libraries, as well as how to select a consultant and build a successful client/consultant relationship.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

William T. Mooney

Use a nine‐phase process in every consulting relationship.

Abstract

Use a nine‐phase process in every consulting relationship.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Miriam Y. Lacey

Articles on consulting usually focus on the external consultant andthe perspective of the internal consultant is rarely discussed. Comparesthe general world of consulting…

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7767

Abstract

Articles on consulting usually focus on the external consultant and the perspective of the internal consultant is rarely discussed. Compares the general world of consulting for organizational change, as typified by the external consultant, with the specific world of the internal consultant. Following the phases of the consulting cycle, highlights salient differences. Outlines the advantages and disadvantages of the internal consultant world.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Mark Hackett and Harry Gee

The role of consultant obstetricians is under considerable debate. This has particularly focused on the role of consultants in intrapartum care. The article explores the…

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367

Abstract

The role of consultant obstetricians is under considerable debate. This has particularly focused on the role of consultants in intrapartum care. The article explores the role of the consultant in delivery suite from the view point of a consultant, a clinical director, a training programme director and a chief executive. These viewpoints determine a range of common themes which mean the duties of consultants over their career lifecycle need to be addressed; the need to expand consultant posts; and the tensions which inevitably occur. The authors believe these need to be addressed because of the need to ensure consultant roles in delivery suite are developed as a key part of seeing quality improvement.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

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