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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Caitlin Moore and Lyn Robinson

The purpose of this paper is to report a new resource for the study of the history of the development of information science and information services in the late twentieth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a new resource for the study of the history of the development of information science and information services in the late twentieth century. The Monty Hyams archives include documents relating to the career of Montagu Hyams (1918-2013), the Founder of Derwent Publications, and an innovator in patents information, chemical and pharmaceutical information, and online information access. The Archive is housed in the Department of Library and Information Science at City, University of London.

Design/methodology/approach

The origins and development of the Monty Hyams Archive are described, and its value examined by an initial analysis of the light it sheds on the development of Derwent’s World Patents Index.

Findings

The newly established Hyams Archive allows analysis of previously private and unseen documents, which reveal the fascinating and complex personalities, issues and negotiations which led to the establishment of some of the most significant information sources and access methods of the pre-internet information environment.

Originality/value

The Monty Hyams Archive is a new and unique resource for the study of the development of the scientific information environment in the last decades of the twentieth century.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2022

Cassandra Caitlin Moore

This paper aims to explore the relationship between market pricing and design quality within the development industry. Currently, there is a lack of research that examines real…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between market pricing and design quality within the development industry. Currently, there is a lack of research that examines real estate at the property level. Development quality is widely believed to have diminished over the past decades, while many investors seem uninterested in the design process. The study aims to address these issues through a pricing model that integrates design attributes. It is hoped that empirical findings will invite broader stakeholder interest in the design process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research establishes a framework for assessing spatial compliance across residential developments within London. Compliance is assessed across ten boroughs, with technical space guidelines used as a proxy for design quality. Transaction prices and spatial assessments are aligned within a hedonic pricing model. Empirical findings are used to establish whether undermining spatial standards presents a significant development risk.

Findings

Findings suggest a relationship between sale time and unit size, with “compliant” units typically transacting earlier than “non-compliant” units. Almost half of the 1,600 apartments surveyed appear to undermine technical guidelines.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that an array of design attributes be explored that extend beyond unit size. Additionally, future studies may consider the long-term implications of design quality via secondary transaction prices.

Practical implications

Practical implications include the development of a more scientific approach to design valuation. This may enhance the position of product design management within the development industry and architectural services.

Social implications

Social implications may include improvement in residential design.

Originality/value

An innovative approach combines a thorough understanding of both design and economic principles.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2023

Caitlin Pink, Dean Wilkie and Christopher Graves

Despite brands’ growing use of social media, most research has overlooked the impact of brand perceptions, particularly that of a family brand identity and perceptions of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite brands’ growing use of social media, most research has overlooked the impact of brand perceptions, particularly that of a family brand identity and perceptions of authenticity. Often the purpose of a social media post is to positively change or enhance these perceptions and, consequently, increase a consumer’s purchase intentions. However, how a post influences purchase intentions, that is, the post-to-purchase journey, is not well understood. This study aims to investigate how characteristics of social media post influence purchase intentions through the mediated effects of social media engagement and perceptions of brand authenticity and how a family brand identity enhances this post-to-purchase journey.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on signalling theory, a sequential mediation model is devised, reflecting the post-to-purchase journey. Starting with identifying desirable characteristics of social media content, the sequential roles of social media engagement and brand authenticity and ending with purchase intentions – with the impact of family brand identity overlayed at each step. This model is analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling and data from 227 UK consumers.

Findings

Four desirable characteristics of social media posts are affirmed – creativity, information, persuasion and inspiration. Each was theoretically justified as costly signals and captured different aspects of effective content, indicating their relative importance. The proposed post-to-purchase journey is supported, with family brand perceptions enhancing each step.

Originality/value

Addressing a need to look beyond current conceptualisations and theoretical underpinnings, this paper puts forward a post-to-purchase journey, incorporating brand-related perceptions, resulting in a deeper understanding of how social media builds purchase intentions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2023

Caitlin McArthur, Reem T. Mulla, Luke A. Turcotte, Jessica Chi-Yen Chu, Micaela Jantzi and John P. Hirdes

Long-term care (LTC) homes are highly regulated settings that provide care to people living with complex health conditions who are often at the end of their lives. Mental health

Abstract

Long-term care (LTC) homes are highly regulated settings that provide care to people living with complex health conditions who are often at the end of their lives. Mental health and quality of life are important concepts in LTC given the inherent poor health and diminished autonomy of residents living in this setting. The COVID-19 pandemic had the potential to further compound these issues through lockdowns limiting movement within and outside of LTC homes, increased fear of severe COVID-19 infections, staff shortages, and impaired communication through personal protective equipment. However, the evidence describing the effect of the pandemic on mental health and quality of life is mixed, with some studies describing increased rates of mental health concerns and others presenting modest increases or decreases. Creative strategies to mitigate negative mental health consequences of lockdown included technology supported and window or outdoor visits, increased access to volunteers, and supports for families. However, the evidence in this area continues to evolve as subsequent waves of the pandemic progress. Future research may present new evidence about other strategies that became important in different stages of the pandemic.

Details

COVID-19, Frontline Responders and Mental Health: A Playbook for Delivering Resilient Public Health Systems Post-Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-115-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Ashley J. Maister, Caitlin McCarthy, Lee G. Ruszczyk, Rachael Evans and Megan E. Maroney

Integrated health care occurs when specialty and general care providers work together to address both the physical and mental health needs of their patients. The Substance Abuse…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated health care occurs when specialty and general care providers work together to address both the physical and mental health needs of their patients. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration model of integration is broken into six levels of coordinated, co-located and integrated care. Our institution offers both co-located and integrated care among eight clinic sites. The care team is typically composed of the primary care provider, nurse and medical assistant, but other professionals may be introduced based on the patient’s medical and psychiatric conditions. The purpose of this prospective, quality improvement study was to compare the rates of adherence to long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIAs) between both types of integrated primary care settings at our institution. The comparison of the two settings sought to determine which environment provides improved outcomes for patients with serious psychiatric illnesses. Additionally, we aimed to assess the quality of medication-related monitoring and care team composition between care settings, and the ability of pharmacists to deliver interprofessional care team training and education on LAI use in clinical practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were identified and included in the study if they had received primary care services from our institution within the previous 12 months. Patient demographic and laboratory variables were collected at baseline and when clinically indicated. The rates of adherence between care settings were assessed at intervals that align with the medication’s administration schedule (e.g. every four weeks). Medication-related monitoring parameters were collected at baseline and when clinically indicated. The interprofessional care team completed Likert scale surveys to evaluate the pharmacist’s LAIA education and training.

Findings

There was not a statistically significant difference detected between integrated primary care settings on the rates of adherence to LAIAs. Additionally, there was not a statistically significant difference between rates of adherence to medication-related monitoring parameters or the effect of the patient treatment team composition. There was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-session survey scores following interprofessional education and training provided by a pharmacist.

Originality/value

Because overall rates of adherence were low, both primary care settings were found to be equivalent. Our study may have been underpowered to detect a difference in the primary endpoint because of the small sample size. However, our study demonstrates that interprofessional education and training may lend itself to changes in practice, which is evident by the clinically significant relative increase in adherence. The Henry J. Austin Health Center network will be implementing a standard operating procedure regarding LAIA management within the primary care setting. Further studies are needed to assess a larger number of patients between both types of primary care settings, as well as the impact of the clinical psychiatric pharmacist as a member of the treatment team.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2022

Abstract

Details

Clean Language Interviewing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-331-5

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2023

Hilary Downey and John F. Sherry, Jr

Sacrifice, integral to gift giving, remains unexplored and undertheorized in marketing. This paper aims to address this shortfall by analyzing the dynamics of sacrifice and…

Abstract

Purpose

Sacrifice, integral to gift giving, remains unexplored and undertheorized in marketing. This paper aims to address this shortfall by analyzing the dynamics of sacrifice and theorizing how it serves as an engine of the gift chimney.

Design/methodology/approach

The ethnographic investigation of public ceremonial gift giving in sectarian Northern Ireland describes and interprets the complex nature of the gift.

Findings

The authors show that sacrifice is a plausible mechanism of the gift chimney and that the co-occurrence of monadic, dyadic and systemic giving in the same ritual acts as an accelerant.

Social implications

The authors analyze how public ceremonial gift giving induces sectarian communities to risk convocation, enabling them to exorcize trauma sustained at one another’s hands and to build a platform for future cross-community cohesion in a context of ineffective institutional efforts.

Originality/value

Sacrifice propels circulation of the gift, creating a social bond between antagonists whose ethos of mutuality depends upon ritualized reciprocal recognition of entangled loss.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2022

Caitlin Walker and Marian Way

Underpinning clean language interviewing is a set of skills that allow the interviewer great facility in tracking what has been presented. These skills include minimising personal…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

Underpinning clean language interviewing is a set of skills that allow the interviewer great facility in tracking what has been presented. These skills include minimising personal inference and making an informed choice of what question to ask. They are grounded in the logic of the interviewee's data and the purpose of the interview.

This chapter makes visible four hidden skills I identified through reflection on a doctoral study I conducted using clean language interviewing. These are, how I: ‘parcel out’ sentences in order to build visual-spatial schema; apply content-free codes during the interview; decide what is salient in the interviewee's words and gestures; and use adjacency to navigate my way around the data. Since these skills are applied moment-by-moment during the interview, I refer to them as ‘coding in-the-moment’. I conclude with a comparison between grounded theory methodology and clean language interviewing.

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Emma A. Jane

While a growing body of literature reveals the prevalence of men's harassment and abuse of women online, scant research has been conducted into women's attacks on each other in…

Abstract

While a growing body of literature reveals the prevalence of men's harassment and abuse of women online, scant research has been conducted into women's attacks on each other in digital networked environments. This chapter responds to this research gap by analyzing data obtained from qualitative interviews with Australian women who have received at times extremely savage cyberhate they know or strongly suspect was sent by other women. Drawing on scholarly literature on historical intra-feminism schisms – specifically what have been dubbed the “mommy wars” and the “sex wars” – this chapter argues that the conceptual lenses of internalized misogyny and lateral violence are useful in their framing of internecine conflict within marginalized groups as diagnostic of broader, systemic oppression rather than being solely the fault of individual actors. These lenses, however, require multiple caveats and have many limitations. In conclusion, I canvas the possibility that the pressure women may feel to present a united front in the interests of feminist politics could itself be considered an outcome of patriarchal oppression (even if performing solidarity is politically expedient and/or essential). As such, there might come a time when openly renouncing discourses of sisterhood and feeling free to disagree with, and even dislike, other women might be considered markers of liberation.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2022

Caitlin Notley, Ben Houghton, Vivienne Maskrey, Richard Holland, Anne Lingford-Hughes, Bhaskar Punukollu, Theodora Duka and Christos Kouimtsidis

Dependent alcohol use is a severe addictive disorder with significant enduring consequences for health and social functioning. This study aims to inductively explore the process…

Abstract

Purpose

Dependent alcohol use is a severe addictive disorder with significant enduring consequences for health and social functioning. This study aims to inductively explore the process of identity change for alcohol dependent people progressing through a “pre-habilitation” intervention, alcohol detoxification and post-detoxification recovery support.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative study as a part of a process evaluation situated within a UK feasibility trial of a group-based intervention in preparation for structured alcohol detoxification. Semi-structured qualitative interviews (face-to-face or telephone) collected self-reported data on experiences of treatment provision as part of the feasibility trial. Thematic analysis of transcripts and iterative categorisation of identity-related themes and concepts was conducted with verification of analysis undertaken by a second coder.

Findings

Identity change was revealed in participant narratives around the meta themes of external (social-identity) and internal (self-identity) concepts. External influences impacting social identity were key, having influenced initiation into alcohol use, influencing acceptance of the stigmatised “alcoholic” label and then being central to the treatment journey. Internal influences on self-identity also impacted on the process of identity change. In recovery, there was hope in discovering a new “normal” identity or rediscovering normality.

Originality/value

Analysis demonstrates that moving from regular alcohol use to problematic use is a journey of identity change that is influenced at the macro (cultural), meso (group) and micro (relational) social levels. Throughout the treatment journey, social influences in gaining a new non-drinker identity are key. Findings suggest a need for long-term support through treatment and community-based groups specifically to foster positive identity change that may not have been addressed previously.

Details

Drugs, Habits and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-6739

Keywords

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