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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Barry Ardley and Sanngarri Naikar

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role played by tacit knowledge in marketing decision making in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and to extrapolate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role played by tacit knowledge in marketing decision making in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and to extrapolate the ramifications, in terms of practice and theory generation.

Design/methodology/approach

To provide support for the existence of tacit expertise, research was framed around three key questions and in-depth interview data drawn from SME senior managers. Although limited in number, interviewees represent a range of different types of SME businesses.

Findings

In SMEs, tacit knowledge presents a reservoir of expertise that reflects the recondite characteristics of marketing decision making. Strategies in marketing were found to be about locally situated networks, intersubjective knowledge and intuitive based judgements that led to important company advantages in the market place.

Practical implications

Based on an analysis of the findings and despite the abstruse nature of tacit knowledge, this paper tentatively suggests ways for marketers to unravel it. The suggestion is that tacit and locally significant experience and expertise in marketing is a basis for theory and practice, with potential for dissemination.

Originality/value

Tacit knowledge is a notable, yet widely overlooked area of SME marketing. Highlighted here are both managerial and learning challenges in terms of better conceptualising the understanding of marketing and SME activity regarding this largely unarticulated base of practice.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2020

Barry Ardley, Eleanor McIntosh and John McManus

The aim of this paper is to examine the extent of value co-creation activity that exists in online brand communities. The approach was to use elements of practice theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the extent of value co-creation activity that exists in online brand communities. The approach was to use elements of practice theory to analyse the member-to-member Adult Fans of Lego (AFOL) community

Design/methodology/approach

The method adopted was netnography based on a study of eight LEGO Facebook groups. The study involved the collection of data in the form of text and images. Over a period of several months, the interactions between the AFOL ‘MEMBERS’ was examined and analysed.

Findings

Using the characteristics of brand communities established by Muniz and O'Guinn as an investigative framework, the research established that there exists a range of co-creation practices in the AFOL communities revolving around engagement procedures and understandings.

Practical implications

A range of strategies is revealed into how co-creation is established and maintained in an online community having key implications for the management of business processes.

Originality/value

With limited previous research on member-to-member brand communities using practice theory, this paper demonstrates that customer skills and knowledge are now a central aspect of value creation, demonstrating a shift away from the firm as the sole provider of worth.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Gary Bosworth, Barry Ardley and Sabine Gerlach

In response to the cancellation of a host of events during the summer of 2020, the purpose of this paper is to examine the rapid innovation that created an online County…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the cancellation of a host of events during the summer of 2020, the purpose of this paper is to examine the rapid innovation that created an online County Show. County Shows are traditionally associated with agriculture and the wider rural economy of a region and provide a range of visitor experiences alongside business networking and trading opportunities. The case of the online Lincolnshire Show sought to replicate many aspects of a physical show, and this paper evaluates its effectiveness by applying a newly developed e-eventscape model.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach generated data from businesses, visitors and the show organiser. Surveys and social media feedback from attendees captured overall satisfaction levels and suggestions for improvements. Participation in the online Business Breakfast event along with an interview with the chief executive officer (CEO) of the Show provided deeper understanding of the innovation occurring.

Findings

The nature of innovation was strongly rooted in place, despite creating a virtual product. Local networks and supporters were critical to staging the online Show. The proposed e-eventscape model allowed an effective appraisal of the online Show, identifying many strengths in terms of the user interface and aesthetics as well as opportunities for improvement, especially linked to greater interactive engagement.

Originality/value

The impacts of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have accelerated digital innovation in a range of events and festivals. This provides an opportunity to examine the evolving role of Shows in the rural economy and the innovation processes that have emerged. As well as presenting original insights into rural innovation, the paper develops and tests a new e-eventscape model applicable to the growing field of online events and festivals. Findings indicate that there is considerable scope for organisers to embed online content into the future of many live Shows and festivals, far beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Barry Ardley, Philip Moss and Nick Taylor

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of small business entrepreneurs regarding the efficacy of external business advisers in delivering sustainable strategic and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of small business entrepreneurs regarding the efficacy of external business advisers in delivering sustainable strategic and operational guidance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is interpretivist, exploring the narratives of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owner/managers in manufacturing. Five in-depth interviews were carried out, revealing a range of decision stories about the use of external business advisers.

Findings

While there was some scepticism towards the use of advisers in certain situations, the research revealed that levels of trust, relationship building and the credibility of the consultant are substantial factors in determining whether the engagement is successful.

Research limitations/implications

As a small-scale study, it would be worthwhile to examine the perceptions of additional entrepreneurs to business advisers to compare research findings.

Practical implications

Policy regarding advice to small businesses should be framed in terms of the local context of the firm and its owner, rather than on broad and generalisable systems of business knowledge. Time and effort is required to build a sustainable relationship between advisers and owners, and it is recommended that particular attention be paid to the process.

Social implications

The research suggests that potentially, industrial policy regarding current delivery of small business advice requires readjustments towards more of a relationship focus.

Originality/value

Little established research appears to exist in relation to the tendency or otherwise, for SME decision makers to pursue and use external advice. This paper helps to fill an important gap in the literature while offering some significant and nuanced insights into the perceptions of SME owner managers.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Barry Ardley, Nick Taylor, Emily McLintock, Frankii Martin and Gavin Leonard

The purpose of this paper is to analyse visitor perceptions of the Lincoln Magna Carta exhibition, in the context of an experiential servicescape perspective.

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1583

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse visitor perceptions of the Lincoln Magna Carta exhibition, in the context of an experiential servicescape perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Data come from a questionnaire carried out with visitors to the Magna Carta exhibition in Lincoln Castle, UK. The approach was framed by the student as producer perspective, that is about re‐engineering the relationship between academics and undergraduate students.

Findings

It is found that three main problems exist in terms of the servicescape. These are guidance signage, the small, dark inauspicious surroundings of the exhibition itself and the level of visitor interactivity present.

Research limitations/implications

This is only a small‐scale project of one Magna Carta exhibition. Research with more visitors would help to further validate the findings and conclusions of this paper and also assist in other representations of the document in other sites.

Practical implications

Suggestions are made for improvement to a number of experiential servicescape elements. These improved representations also need to be planned for adequately in the new staging of the document, when Lincoln Castle receives planned additional funds from the Heritage Lottery.

Social implications

This paper draws attention to the fact that the Magna Carta is a shared part of a global cultural identity, where the marketing of the document represents a great privilege.

Originality/value

In this paper, the experiential servicescape framework is used in an original way to critique aspects of the current exhibition and to propose new ideas for representing the Magna Carta. The paper is based on original data that makes a novel contribution to the debate regarding research and learning in higher education.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Barry Ardley

This paper uses phenomenology as a critical theoretical lens through which to view marketing management theory. The aim is to demonstrate that it can uncover the extent to…

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2576

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses phenomenology as a critical theoretical lens through which to view marketing management theory. The aim is to demonstrate that it can uncover the extent to which established theory neglects the human side of marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

To facilitate a phenomenological discussion, the critical framework of Mingers is utilised. This identifies a critique of rhetoric, of tradition, of authority and of objectivity. Secondary sources are then used to highlight the central role played by individual meaning in marketing practice, as opposed to the systemic based framework of the dominant theory.

Findings

Findings suggest that traditional theory is based on questionable assumptions regarding the nature of the individual and their managerial practice. Marketing theory is not a transferable objective technology, but is constituted by the vagaries of the human agent. It is also posited that the subject boundaries of marketing are set by established authorities that are prone to discourage alternative perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

This is a position paper and additional empirical research could be undertaken in order to help further discuss the claims made.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that marketing management has the potential to be understood in ways that go beyond the representation of it in established theory. Alternative conceptions of marketing hold the potential of informing future theory and practice developments.

Originality/value

Insights into marketing practice, acquired through the use of an innovative and critically informed phenomenological framework, have led to the questioning of a dominant theory that routinely ignores the human side of marketing activity.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Barry Ardley and Nick Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of a group of undergraduate students undertaking marketing research consultancy projects for employers. The…

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2215

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of a group of undergraduate students undertaking marketing research consultancy projects for employers. The projects are informed by action learning. The intention is to demonstrate that this method of learning facilitates a level of student skill development that more traditional marketing courses find difficult to achieve.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is underpinned by an interpretivist approach. Research involved students taking part in two focus groups during the consultancy and the completion of pre‐ and post‐consultancy open‐ended questionnaires.

Findings

Findings suggest that the marketing consultancy project represents a way to help develop the general skills required by novice marketers. Students show an understanding of the importance of acquiring communicative, interpersonal, creative and team‐based skills. These assist them in developing a practical knowledge neglected by much existing marketing teaching.

Research limitations/implications

The findings although based on a small sample, indicate that marketing education if based on action learning, positively engages learners. The emphasis on practice suggests that experience, work place socialisation and tacit knowledge, are essential components of learning about marketing that often get overlooked in more traditional marketing courses.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that much established marketing education does not take sufficient account of experiential based learning and instead, is wedded to a model of teaching that sees marketing as being mainly about the transmission of administratively based knowledge. This paper argues that relying overly on the latter will not provide tomorrow's marketers with an appropriate skill set for employment.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Ross Brennan

Downloads
899

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Val Cox

Downloads
761

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

John McManus

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101

Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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