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1 – 10 of over 7000
Article
Publication date: 31 January 2022

Sara Giganto, Susana Martínez-Pellitero, Eduardo Cuesta, Pablo Zapico and Joaquín Barreiro

Among the different methodologies used for performance control in precision manufacturing, the measurement of metrological test artefacts becomes very important for the…

Abstract

Purpose

Among the different methodologies used for performance control in precision manufacturing, the measurement of metrological test artefacts becomes very important for the characterization, optimization and performance evaluation of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. The purpose of this study is to design and manufacture several benchmark artefacts to evaluate the accuracy of the selective laser melting (SLM) manufacturing process.

Design/methodology/approach

Artefacts consist of different primitive features (planes, cylinders and hemispheres) on sloped planes (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°) and stair-shaped and sloped planes (from 0° to 90°, at 5° intervals), manufactured in 17-4PH stainless steel. The artefacts were measured optically by a structured light scanner to verify the geometric dimensioning and tolerancing of SLM manufacturing.

Findings

The results provide design recommendations for precision SLM manufacturing of 17-4PH parts. Regarding geometrical accuracy, it is recommended to avoid surfaces with 45° negative slopes or higher. On the other hand, the material shrinkage effect can be compensated by resizing features according to X and Y direction.

Originality/value

No previous work has been found that evaluates accuracy when printing inwards (pockets) and outwards (pads) geometries at different manufacturing angles using SLM. The proposed artefacts can be used to determine the manufacturing accuracy of different AM systems by resizing to fit the build envelope of the system to evaluate. Analysis of manufactured benchmark artefacts allows to determine rules for the most suitable design of the desired parts.

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Jayalaxmi Anem, G. Sateeshkumar and R. Madhu

The main aim of this paper is to design a technique for improving the quality of EEG signal by removing artefacts which is obtained during acquisition. Initially…

39

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this paper is to design a technique for improving the quality of EEG signal by removing artefacts which is obtained during acquisition. Initially, pre-processing is done on EEG signal for quality improvement. Then, by using wavelet transform (WT) feature extraction is done. The artefacts present in the EEG are removed using deep convLSTM. This deep convLSTM is trained by proposed fractional calculus based flower pollination optimisation algorithm.

Design/methodology/approach

Nowadays' EEG signals play vital role in the field of neurophysiologic research. Brain activities of human can be analysed by using EEG signals. These signals are frequently affected by noise during acquisition and other external disturbances, which lead to degrade the signal quality. Denoising of EEG signals is necessary for the effective usage of signals in any application. This paper proposes a new technique named as flower pollination fractional calculus optimisation (FPFCO) algorithm for the removal of artefacts from EEG signal through deep learning scheme. FPFCO algorithm is the integration of flower pollination optimisation and fractional calculus which takes the advantages of both the flower pollination optimisation and fractional calculus which is used to train the deep convLSTM. The existed FPO algorithm is used for solution update through global and local pollinations. In this case, the fractional calculus (FC) method attempts to include the past solution by including the second order derivative. As a result, the suggested FPFCO algorithm approaches the best solution faster than the existing flower pollination optimization (FPO) method. Initially, 5 EEG signals are contaminated by artefacts such as EMG, EOG, EEG and random noise. These contaminated EEG signals are pre-processed to remove baseline and power line noises. Further, feature extraction is done by using WT and extracted features are applied to deep convLSTM, which is trained by proposed fractional calculus based flower pollination optimisation algorithm. FPFCO is used for the effective removal of artefacts from EEG signal. The proposed technique is compared with existing techniques in terms of SNR and MSE.

Findings

The proposed technique is compared with existing techniques in terms of SNR, RMSE and MSE.

Originality/value

100%.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Elisabeth Zsoka Palvölgyi and Jürgen Moormann

Companies that strive to provide customers with value in their processes benefit from artefacts that allow them to better understand customer processes (CPs) and to…

Abstract

Purpose

Companies that strive to provide customers with value in their processes benefit from artefacts that allow them to better understand customer processes (CPs) and to influence CPs in ways that are valuable for customers. Such CP-centric artefacts (CPCAs) carry various labels across research fields, which inhibit their application or utilization for developing further artefacts. This study provides a structured overview of existing CPCAs and investigates which research foundations promote their development.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-five CP-related keyword combinations are applied in several iterations using multiple (meta) search engines to identify papers on CPCAs across different research streams. Introduced research frameworks organize the identified artefacts and indicate research gaps and reasons why some approaches are more successful in developing CPCAs than others.

Findings

Existing CPCAs cover different aspects of CPs and utilize contextual factors of CPs to varying degrees to analyse or influence CPs. Research gaps are identified that indicate opportunities to develop further CPCAs. Taking instantiated methods in combination with CP-related descriptive knowledge as a foundation yields the highest potential for generating beneficial CPCAs.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to CP management literature by offering a foundation for the generation of CPCAs suitable for analysing and influencing CPs of end-consumers. This supports the establishment of a CP management aiming at optimizing both, interlinked business processes and CPs.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Diego Ponte, Alessandro Rossi and Marco Zamarian

This paper contributes to the debate on the relationship between IT‐artefacts and organisational structuration by describing the dynamics surrounding the collaborative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper contributes to the debate on the relationship between IT‐artefacts and organisational structuration by describing the dynamics surrounding the collaborative development of an innovative electronic metering system. The aim of the paper is to address a clear gap in the current literature on collaborative IT‐artefacts design, as cooperation at early design stages has barely been analysed. This work tries to understand whether and to what extent the design of an IT‐artefact is driven by the interests of a number of heterogeneous actors and how these are able to affect the artefact's evolution.

Design/methodology/approach

The research relies on a case study analysis, which focuses on a consortium of heterogeneous actors (firms, the public sector, research institutes) working within the green energy industry. The research focuses on a workgroup attempting to develop an innovative IT‐artefact: an electronic metering system.

Findings

The main results emerging from the field study are: the relevance of each actor's interests as a prevalent rationale for explaining the technical features of the IT‐artefact; the role of negotiation and consensus in determining the final shape of the IT‐artefact in terms of its features; and the bundling/unbundling of IT‐artefact features as a result of changes in the alignment of actors.

Research limitations/implications

The research presents two clear limitations. First, the activities of the workgroup are still ongoing thus limiting some of the insights one may draw from the case study. Second, the analysis is carried out on a single case study. Further analysis should be done to increase consistency and validity of the findings.

Practical implications

Findings indicate that in an open and collaborative environment, the conceptualisation and evolution of an IT‐artefact are influenced more by the political agendas of the various actors rather than by pure technical problems and concerns. The practical implications thus are that every attempt to manage such a collaborative effort must seriously take into consideration these aspects.

Originality/value

Starting from the recognition that little research has been conducted on the factors influencing cooperative IT‐artefact design, this paper sheds new light on how these factors influence such cooperative activity. The authors believe that this kind of work helps lay some foundations for general models attempting to explain cooperative innovation processes such as the open innovation model.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Paula McIver Nottingham

This paper aims to explore graduate perspectives about the creation and use of professional artefacts to communicate work-based inquiry projects to professional audiences.

1290

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore graduate perspectives about the creation and use of professional artefacts to communicate work-based inquiry projects to professional audiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on constructivist qualitative interviews with 14 graduates from a part-time professional practice in arts programme and used thematic analysis to interpret and discuss the findings.

Findings

Participants indicated a perceived value in the use of the professional artefact as a way of articulating their professional inquiry. Professional artefacts enable essential communication skills for professional contexts, have the capacity for engaging with professional audiences that are external to the university, have the potential for enabling further study and workplace employability, show awareness of project management and leadership capabilities and helped some individuals build on and share their own personal philosophy of practice with peer professionals.

Research limitations/implications

As a small-scale research project that used purposive sampling, the findings are not representative, but could provide the creative means to develop professional artefacts within work-related educational programmes and workplace learning programmes.

Practical implications

It is argued that the process and production of professional artefacts can provide the means for communicating work-based projects to professional audiences within workplace settings.

Originality/value

Professional artefacts explore and present developmental aspects of work-based inquiries with distinctive creative approaches to favour practice knowledge and innovation that can be expressively shared with peer professionals.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Enrico Maria Piras

The paper reflects on the role of knowledge artefacts in the patient-provider relationship across the organisational boundaries of the clinical setting. Drawing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reflects on the role of knowledge artefacts in the patient-provider relationship across the organisational boundaries of the clinical setting. Drawing on the analysis of the diabetes logbook, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the role of knowledge artefacts in a fragmented system of knowledge through the study of two distinct practices: “logbook compiling” and “consultation in the surgery”.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework of analysis is rooted in the tradition of practice-based studies which envisions knowledge as the emerging, precarious and socially constructed product of being involved in a practice. The paper follows a designed qualitative research, conducting semi-structured interviews, participant observation and artefact analysis.

Findings

The knowledge artefacts support different and partially irreducible forms of knowledge. Knowing-in-practice is accomplished by means of different activities which contribute to the reshaping of the knowledge artefact itself. The analysis of the “knowledge artefact-in-use” reveals that different actors (doctors and patients) adopt two different perspectives when investigating the chronic condition. Clinicians are interested in a chronological representation of patient data while patients and families are interested in making sense of specific situations, adopting a kairotic perspective (Kairos: the right moment) that emphasises the instant in which something significant for someone happens.

Originality/value

The analysis of the knowledge artefacts-in-use has a twofold outcome. On one hand, it illustrates the mutual shaping of knowing, artefacts and practices. On the other hand, it shows how knowledge artefact can become pivotal resources in a fragmented system of knowledge.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Marie Marchand and Louis Raymond

As calls have been made to characterize and theorise performance measurement systems (PMS) and as these systems are highly contextualised because of their mission-critical…

Abstract

Purpose

As calls have been made to characterize and theorise performance measurement systems (PMS) and as these systems are highly contextualised because of their mission-critical nature, the purpose of this paper is to generate empirically-valid and useful findings with regard to their characterisation as information technology artefacts through an approach founded upon the user’s perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Using both qualitative and quantitative data collection approaches, the authors conducted a field study through extensive interviews in situ with the owner-managers of 16 small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Findings

The PMS are characterised, from their users’ point of view, in terms of their functional attributes as information systems dedicated to the management of organisational performance, that is, as being either operational, functional, managerial or organisational systems.

Research limitations/implications

Having modelled the PMS artefact in terms of its artefactual dimensions and features, the authors have empirically validated a characterisation approach that allows researchers to circumscribe this artefact within its specific usage context and to identify its salient attributes as study variables.

Practical implications

The research findings provide an empirical basis for the design and evaluation of PMS that is coherent with the specific context of their use in SMEs.

Originality/value

This study validates a novel and demonstrably useful artefactual perspective to characterize and theorise PMS as objects of empirical research.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Johan M. Berlin and Eric D. Carlström

Earlier studies have identified artefacts, but have only to a lesser degree looked at their effects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how artefacts contribute…

1230

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier studies have identified artefacts, but have only to a lesser degree looked at their effects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how artefacts contribute to organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A trauma team at a university hospital has been observed and its members interviewed.

Findings

The trauma team showed itself to be rich on artefacts since it had strong internal driving forces, high legitimacy, and tried to live up to high expectations from the outside. Its members were motivated to be in the forefront of trauma care. Through renewal, the team succeeded in maintaining demarcation. It also succeeded in systemising internal work tasks and made for itself a position in relation to the outside. The team's capacity, however, came to be limited by internal conflicts and battles for prestige.

Practical implications

The study shows that informal logic has a strong influence on teams. Teamwork contributed to the development of organisational structure and motivation for the personnel.

Originality/value

Earlier studies advocate the important role of artefacts in order to communicate, collaborate, negotiate or coordinate activities. The conclusion is that artefacts also have an organising and developing effect on teams in a fragmented and differentiated healthcare.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Chikezirim Okorafor, Fidelis Emuze, Dillip Das, Bankole Osita Awuzie and Theo Haupt

The built environment is well known for carbon emission and its impact especially as it pertains to existing buildings. This has culminated in an increasing need for a…

Abstract

Purpose

The built environment is well known for carbon emission and its impact especially as it pertains to existing buildings. This has culminated in an increasing need for a retrofit of such buildings. This study details the development of an artefact for improving the delivery of energy retrofit projects therein to curb these impacts.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a mixed method research design for data collection. In achieving this, data was collected in three different phases; (1) a pilot study; (2) a juxtaposition of desktop case studies, live case studies, focus group discussion forum and an expert survey; and (3) a questionnaire survey for the validation of the emergent artefact. Accordingly, the quantitative data was analysed using descriptive statistics, whereas qualitative content analysis was deployed for qualitative data.

Findings

The findings enabled an identification of the elements of a building energy retrofit project (BERP) such as project initiation, building assessment, detailed energy survey, technical analysis and implementation plans of energy measures, monitoring and verification. Also, it provided the challenges and enablers associated with successful BERP. This information was subsequently utilized in the development and validation of an artefact for delivering successful BERP. Summarily, a set of guidelines comprising of seven stages for managing successful BERPs were elucidated.

Practical implications

The validated artefact provides an adaptive and innovative route for achieving sustainability in retrofit trade.

Originality/value

The study conceptualizes an artefact for improving the delivery of BERPs.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Shah J. Miah, Don Kerr and Liisa von Hellens

The knowledge of artefact design in design science research can have an important application in the improvement of decision support systems (DSS) development research…

1127

Abstract

Purpose

The knowledge of artefact design in design science research can have an important application in the improvement of decision support systems (DSS) development research. Recent DSS literature has identified a significant need to develop user-centric DSS method for greater relevance with respect to context of use. The purpose of this paper is to develop a collective DSS design artefact as method in a practical industry context.

Design/methodology/approach

Under the influence of goal-directed interaction design principles the study outlines the innovative DSS artefact based on design science methodology to deliver a cutting-edge decision support solution, which provides user-centric provisions through the use of design environment and ontology techniques.

Findings

The DSS artefact as collective information technology applications through the application of design science knowledge can effectively be designed to meet decision makers’ contextual needs in an agricultural industry context.

Research limitations/implications

The study has limitations in that it was developed in a case study context and remains to be fully tested in a real business context. It is also assumed that the domain decisions can be parameterised and represented using a constraint programming language.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that the DSS artefact design and this development successfully overcomes some of the limitations of traditional DSS such as low-user uptake, system obsolescence, low returns on investment and a requirement for continual re-engineering effort.

Social implications

The design artefact has the potential of increasing user uptake in an industry that has had relevancy problems with past DSS implementation and has experienced associated poor uptake.

Originality/value

The design science paradigm provides structural guidance throughout the defined process, helping ensure fidelity both to best industry knowledge and to changing user contexts.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000