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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Ryan R. Peterson, Robin B. DiPietro and Richard Harrill

The purpose of this paper is to explore the evolution of inclusive tourism in a small-island tourism economy of the Caribbean. Dubbed the “One Happy Island” in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the evolution of inclusive tourism in a small-island tourism economy of the Caribbean. Dubbed the “One Happy Island” in the Caribbean, the operationalization and development of direct and indirect channels of inclusive tourism are studied and discussed to foster policy guidance and future studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an in-depth case study of Aruba, the findings yield significant insights on the unfolding of inclusive tourism within the context of a maturing small-island tourism economy in Aruba. A mix of historical socioeconomic analysis in conjunction with community resident perspectives provides an expanded framing of small-island inclusive tourism development.

Findings

In mature, small-island tourism economies such as Aruba, social and ecological disparities are particularly evident and over an extended period have exceeded direct economic contribution. The case study reveals an Aruban community experiencing significant negative socioecological impacts and subsequent diminishing economic contribution and well-being. Concerns about environmental pollution and destruction, the loss of quality of life and income equality, in addition to over construction and crowding, indicate a growing animosity toward tourism and further tourism growth.

Research limitations/implications

Based on previous studies, this study provides an extended framing of small-island inclusive tourism, which opens opportunities for further testing and validation across other small-island tourism economies. It provides a conceptual critique of classical tourism growth maxims in small-island developing states.

Originality/value

The paper provides rich historical insights using an in-depth case study approach that extends the concept and evolution of inclusive tourism in mature, small-island tourism destinations, especially in the Caribbean, thus providing a contemporary framing of inclusive tourism.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Maarten B. Eppinga, Jenny Lozano-Cosme, Tobia de Scisciolo, Patrick Arens, Maria J. Santos and Eric N. Mijts

Despite increasing efforts to incorporate sustainability in curricula and practices of institutions of higher education, effective implementation remains challenging. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite increasing efforts to incorporate sustainability in curricula and practices of institutions of higher education, effective implementation remains challenging. The purpose of this study is to present an approach to incorporate sustainability into a practice-oriented research skills course, which was implemented at a small island state university in the Caribbean.

Design/methodology/approach

First-year university students followed a four-week course module, starting with the introduction of the sustainable development goals, and culminating in a symposium in which the students present the findings of their research projects to the campus community. Pre-course module and post-course module surveys measured the students’ knowledge and perceptions regarding sustainability. These survey results were also compared with the result of a similar survey held for the university’s employees.

Findings

The survey results suggested that following the course module increased students’ knowledge about sustainable development, as well as their support for the university campus and its community putting more emphasis on teaching, practicing and encouraging sustainability. Interestingly, university employees scored significantly higher on the latter component than students, suggesting that in this case a lack of interest of the staff is not a barrier toward a sustainable campus.

Originality/value

The presented course module offers a novel and low-cost approach to introducing sustainability into a broad range of academic curricula, specifically tailored to the needs of institutes of higher education in small island states. The survey results suggest that this type of education may not only ensure reaching academic goals but also increase students’ interest in sustainable development within their local environment.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Miguel Goede

The purpose of this paper is to compare the case of Curaçao, as a small island coping with globalization, with Singapore, Barbados, New Zealand, Ireland, and Aruba and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the case of Curaçao, as a small island coping with globalization, with Singapore, Barbados, New Zealand, Ireland, and Aruba and to contribute to the development of a framework for discussing globalization and economic development strategies for small islands.

Design/methodology/approach

The study and the paper follow the inductive line of reasoning, starting by comparing the current situation of six countries – Singapore, Barbados, New Zealand, Ireland, Aruba, and Curaçao. Next the six countries are placed in their respective social, economic, and historical contexts. Then the paper explores what Curaçao can learn from the other six countries by applying the framework of spiral dynamics and the eight‐stage process for creating major change.

Findings

Curaçao can look at other countries and learn a great deal, but Curaçao cannot copy the model of another country and implement it. This is because of the differences between the various exemplars, particularly in the starting position and the changes that have taken place in the world, which make the case of Curaçao unique. Curaçao will have to develop its own model.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the analysis of globalization of small islands.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Robertico Croes

– This study aims to investigate growth differentials among small islands and the impact of tourism specialization on the growth and the economic performance of small islands.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate growth differentials among small islands and the impact of tourism specialization on the growth and the economic performance of small islands.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on trade theory and uses data from a panel of small islands for 1995-2007. It applies panel regression and standard time series methods combined with a qualitative approach.

Findings

Small islands experienced stronger basic patterns of growth than many developed countries, especially where economies of scale are not an issue. The findings further suggest that tourism specialization is not harmful to growth, and, in lieu of technological gaps and resource limitations, tourism specialization is a sound option. Size, a lack of complete sovereignty or independence and export orientation do not seem to affect the variance in the real per capita GDP at a greater degree. Finally, small islands may leverage returns to scale in global markets.

Research limitations/implications

While tourism specialization is assumed to enhance growth, in the case of small island destinations, the study did not formally test whether increased terms-of-trade may be perpetually improved.

Practical implications

The study prompted four policy suggestions: small island economies should engage in tourism specialization; small island economies should allocate more resources to the tourism industry than other economic sectors; the success of tourism specialization does not depend exclusively on comparative advantage; and institutional realities and path dependence may play a role in economic performance.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the detection of a paradox in mainstream economics that indicates that small islands may not enjoy sustained economic growth. The detection led to a surprising discovery that tourism specialization may propel growth. The value of the study is twofold: theoretical value is added by suggesting a reconceptualization of the construct capital; and, practical value is strengthened in the sense that tourism specialization may only work under a condition where upon tourism offerings command higher prices than other commodities.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Manuel Rivera, Robertico Croes and YunYing Zhong

This paper aims to examine and identify important attributes for mobile applications (apps) that might dictate tourist preferences for the apps on a small island…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine and identify important attributes for mobile applications (apps) that might dictate tourist preferences for the apps on a small island destination. Guided by the Task Technology Fit (TTF) theory, the study considers the tasks performed, technology characteristics and individuals’ characteristics in determining the mobile apps attribute set.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a conjoint methodology within a case study approach framework. The conjoint analysis allows for assessing preferences from different consumers regarding the objective characteristics of products or services that facilitate the optimal design of product development. Optimal product development is a challenge for destinations, as they strive to achieve and sustain optimal market positions. Mobile apps may empower destinations in this endeavor. The case study approach imparts a context-dependent knowledge that facilitates a more nuanced understanding of consumer preference of use.

Findings

The results of the conjoint analysis suggest a strategic mapping of the most important attributes including type of content information, coupons and location awareness in defining apps product development. Within each attribute, the study also identifies the significant characteristics of a mobile application that are preferred by tourists. This ranking exists irrespective of familiarity with the destination (first-time and repeat visitors).

Research limitations/implications

The implication is that revealed preferences anchored in conjoint analysis provide a powerful approach to optimize product development in a small island destination. From a practical perspective, the findings suggest that the developments of a mobile app for a destination must concentrate on fostering spending and consider the app as a new marketing channel. From a theoretical point of view, the current study highlights the usefulness of using the conjoint analysis and the TTF theory as an overarching framework in mapping a multi-attribute decision-making space that influences tourist judgment and preference of use. The conjoint method applied in the study enables researchers to clearly identify a combination of various mobile app attributes that are most influential on tourists’ choice and preference of use. The guiding framework, TTF theory, allows the conjoint product designs to go beyond the technology characteristics to include tasks performed by tourists and their individual characteristics.

Originality/value

This study is the first to apply a conjoint analysis within the TTF theoretical framework in the context of a small island destination when assessing tourists’ use preferences toward mobile applications, while at the same time investigating whether any differences exist between first-time and repeat visitors. The study demonstrates that complementing the nature of the task (traveling) with context-specific interface and interactive features is an important area of inquiry that can benefit from adopting conjoint analysis.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Chandana Jayawardena and Diaram Ramajeesingh

Introduces a new concept, performance of tourism (POT) analysis as a tool for measuring the performance of tourist destinations. Comments on the Caribbean region’s…

Abstract

Introduces a new concept, performance of tourism (POT) analysis as a tool for measuring the performance of tourist destinations. Comments on the Caribbean region’s overdependence on tourism, and examines the scope of foreign exchange leakage. Tourism in the Caribbean generally grows faster than the world average. Often the success of tourism is measured from the gross figures rather than the net figures. Presents data from four Caribbean countries, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Jamaica and St Lucia to explain the concept. Key findings reflect surprising results. Based on the analysis done, a relatively new tourism destination in the Caribbean, Aruba, has outperformed mature tourist destination, Jamaica, by 16 to one.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Emel Thomas and Peter Clegg

There are several small territories in the Caribbean that have not yet gained their independence and remain under the control of a metropolitan power. These include the…

Abstract

There are several small territories in the Caribbean that have not yet gained their independence and remain under the control of a metropolitan power. These include the territories governed by the United Kingdom (UK) and the Netherlands. This chapter analyses the way in which education policy and reform are enacted in these quite unusual circumstances – with pressures and influences both from the territories and their respective metropoles. The chapter is constructed around two interlinked parts. The first considers the broader political and economic relationships that exist, and the place that education has within them. Both the UK and the Netherlands use language, such as, “partnership,” “prosperity,” and “renewal” to describe their approach to the territories, including in relation to the education sector. However, both governments have used different mechanisms to facilitate change – the British have a slightly more detached approach, while the Dutch are more hands-on. This has important implications for the way in which education is managed in their territories and the consequences that result – and these issues are explored further in the second part of the chapter. By focusing particularly on the Dutch BES (Bonaire, Saint Eustatius, and Saba) islands and Bermuda (a UK Overseas Territory), the chapter traces the contours of recent education reforms, and evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of the particular approaches taken. The more flexible approach of the UK is perhaps preferable, but here too concerns are raised about neocolonialism and the lack of sensitivity when it comes to local norms and practices.

Details

The Global Educational Policy Environment in the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-044-2

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Miguel Goede

– The purpose of this article is to discuss transnational organized crime (TOC) and the relationship to good governance in the Caribbean.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to discuss transnational organized crime (TOC) and the relationship to good governance in the Caribbean.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is exploratory. It follows a path of inductive reasoning, from observation of the eight global cases to a broader general analysis and the development of a theoretical framework or ideal type.

Findings

The influence of TOC on governance in the Caribbean is worrying. Normative theories of democracy, public administration and governance no longer apply. Economic growth diminishes, unemployment rises, crime rises.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of the impact of TOC on good governance especially on Small Island Developing States in the Caribbean.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Milan Jezic von Gesseneck, Renato Toffanin and Josip Jezic von Gesseneck

The purpose of this paper is to describe through innovation system foresight and systemic innovation approach to address key systemic issues of European Union (EU…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe through innovation system foresight and systemic innovation approach to address key systemic issues of European Union (EU) Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) concerning the sustainable development and economic resilience: the authors highlight the need for a systemic approach to innovation policy for the sustainable islands’ growth.

Design/methodology/approach

This research focuses on a multiple case study of selected OCTs, members of the Association of the OCTs. Specifically, this paper illustrates the foresight approach implemented in six OCTs in the context of the Territorial Strategies for Innovation project funded by the 10th European Development Fund.

Findings

The focus is on innovation system foresight and systemic innovation: the authors argue that key innovation elements of the individual OCTs can be used as crucial components of an emerging innovation system while this specific type of foresight can assist the governments of respective OCTs in the selection and design of specific instruments in relation to the formulation of their innovation strategies and policies.

Originality/value

This paper is based on work undertaken by the Territorial Strategies for Innovation project team during a three-year period dedicated to supporting the governments of OCTs both in defining and in implementing their innovation strategies. Its main contribution is to develop the concept of innovation system foresight and systemic innovation for the OCTs. The work presented here is considered to be of value by highlighting specific innovation elements for achieving sustainable and inclusive growth in OCTs.

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1965

W.H. Ailor

With the completion last year of a tropical marine site on the island of Aruba, Reynolds Metals Co., Richmond, Virginia, USA, now has long‐term atmospheric test facilities…

Abstract

With the completion last year of a tropical marine site on the island of Aruba, Reynolds Metals Co., Richmond, Virginia, USA, now has long‐term atmospheric test facilities covering a wide range of natural environments. This report is compiled by the company's senior corrosion engineer. Testing locations include Richmond, Virginia; Phoenix, Arizona; Corpus Christi, Texas; Kure Beach, North Carolina; McCook, Illinois; Manila, Philippine Islands; and Denge Marsh and Widnes, England. Panels are on test also at Arenzano, Italy; Bohus‐Malmon, Sweden; and on a Gulf of Mexico's drill platform. Exposed materials include specimens of bare, painted and colour anodised wrought and extruded aluminium as well as screen wire, fencing, busbar and special products. Stressed and unstressed aluminium is exposed, together with zinc, steel and copper alloys, for calibration and comparison. The programme started in 1956 now includes over 20,000 test specimens. Data on changes in mechanical properties and corrosion rates derived from the tests are handled on a computer.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 12 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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