Search results

1 – 10 of 175
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Stella Christiana Stevens, Lynn Hemmings, Claire Scott, Anthony Lawler and Craig White

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent an engaging or authentic leadership style is related to higher levels of patient safety performance.

3565

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent an engaging or authentic leadership style is related to higher levels of patient safety performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and/or interview of 53 medical and dental staff on their perceptions of leadership style in their unit was conducted. Scores obtained from 51 responses were averaged for each question and overall performance was compared with unit specific hand hygiene (HH) compliance data. Interview material was transcribed and analysed independently by each member of the research team.

Findings

A modest negative relationship between this leadership style and hand hygiene compliance rates (r=0.37) was found. Interview data revealed that environmental factors, role modelling by the leader and education to counter false beliefs about hand hygiene and infection control may be more important determinants of patient safety performance in this regard than actual overall leadership style.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was relatively small, other attributes of leaders were not investigated.

Practical implications

Leadership development for clinicians may need to focus on situational or adaptive capacity rather than a specific style. In the case of improving patient safety through increasing HH compliance, a more directive approach with clear statements backed up by role modelling appears likely to produce better rates.

Originality/value

Little is known about patient safety and clinical leadership. Much of the current focus is on developing transformational, authentic or engaging style. This study provides some evidence that it should not be used exclusively.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Anthony Ang

Addresses employee involvement as a management approach, tracing the concepts, assumptions and roots in which it can be located. It reviews the plethora of typologies based upon…

4727

Abstract

Addresses employee involvement as a management approach, tracing the concepts, assumptions and roots in which it can be located. It reviews the plethora of typologies based upon which employee involvement programmes implemented in organisations today are founded. It advocates further research to enhance the conceptualisation and contextualisation of these programmes for practical implementation, as well as the development of a framework which could be generally accepted for their systematic evaluation.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Peter Boxall, Meng-Long Huo, Keith Macky and Jonathan Winterton

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle individual…

Abstract

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle individual job tasks or a high level of involvement at team or workplace level in designing work procedures. When implementations of HIWPs are accompanied by companion investments in human capital – for example, in better information and training, higher pay and stronger employee voice – it is appropriate to talk not only of HIWPs but of “high-involvement work systems” (HIWSs). This chapter reviews the theory and practice of HIWPs and HIWSs. Across a range of academic perspectives and societies, it has regularly been argued that steps to enhance employee involvement in decision-making create better opportunities to perform, better utilization of skill and human potential, and better employee motivation, leading, in turn, to various improvements in organizational and employee outcomes.

However, there are also costs to increased employee involvement and the authors review the important economic and sociopolitical contingencies that help to explain the incidence or distribution of HIWPs and HIWSs. The authors also review the research on the outcomes of higher employee involvement for firms and workers, discuss the quality of the research methods used, and consider the tensions with which the model is associated. This chapter concludes with an outline of the research agenda, envisaging an ongoing role for both quantitative and qualitative studies. Without ignoring the difficulties involved, the authors argue, from the societal perspective, that the high-involvement pathway should be considered one of the most important vectors available to improve the quality of work and employee well-being.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Naceur Jabroun and Varatharajan Balakrishnan

This paper examines the relationship between participation and job performance. It also seeks to identify the impact of individual variables on the level of participation among…

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between participation and job performance. It also seeks to identify the impact of individual variables on the level of participation among managerial employees in the Public Service Department in Malaysia. Finally, it attempts to determine whether Porter and Lawler's (1968)‐expectancy model could represent an appropriate framework for studying employee participation. The results indicate that the level of perceived participation among managerial employees is high and that employee participation has acmoderate and positive relationship with job performance. The findings appear to match other studies conducted in the West, suggesting that these studies were not very much different across cultures. Managerial employees place equal importance on intrinsic and extrinsic outcomes. Employee participation could be better managed if employees possess certain critical factors. These include high job abilities, greater need for achievement, and a substantial amount of motivation. This study also suggests that Porter and Lawler's (1968) expectancy model is a suitable framework for studying employee participation.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Kristin L. Cullen-Lester, Alexandra Gerbasi and Sean White

This chapter utilizes a network perspective to show how the totality of one’s social connections impacts well-being by providing access to resources (e.g., information, feedback…

Abstract

This chapter utilizes a network perspective to show how the totality of one’s social connections impacts well-being by providing access to resources (e.g., information, feedback, and support) and placing limits on autonomy. We provide a brief review of basic network concepts and explain the importance of understanding how the networks in which leaders are embedded may enhance or diminish their well-being. Further, with this greater understanding, we describe how leaders can help promote the well-being of their employees. In particular, we focus on four key aspects of workplace networks that are likely to impact well-being: centrality, structural holes, embeddedness, and negative ties. We not only discuss practical implications for leaders’ well-being and the well-being of their employees, but also suggest directions for future research.

Details

The Role of Leadership in Occupational Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-061-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Emilija Djurdjevic and Anthony R. Wheeler

The current chapter focuses on environmental and organizational factors that affect the performance appraisal context, performance evaluations, and rating accuracy. Drawing on the…

Abstract

The current chapter focuses on environmental and organizational factors that affect the performance appraisal context, performance evaluations, and rating accuracy. Drawing on the extant literature and focusing on current organizational practices, we propose a dynamic multi-level model of performance rating that takes these distal factors into consideration. In doing so, we also provide propositions explicating causal linkages between these distal factors, more proximal performance appraisal factors, and ultimately the accuracy of performance ratings. Furthermore, we identify current and emerging directions in performance appraisal research and practice. The implications of the current and emerging trends are then discussed in the context of our proposed model.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-824-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Tae-Youn Park, Reed Eaglesham, Jason D. Shaw and M. Diane Burton

Incentives are effective at enhancing productivity, but research also suggests that performance incentives can have “unintended negative consequences” including increases in

Abstract

Incentives are effective at enhancing productivity, but research also suggests that performance incentives can have “unintended negative consequences” including increases in hazard/injuries, increases in errors, and reduction in cooperation, prosocial behaviors, and creativity. Relatively overlooked is whether, when, and how incentives can be designed to prevent such negative consequences. The authors review literature in several disciplines (construction, healthcare delivery, economics, psychology, and [some] management) on this issue. This chapter, in toto, sheds a generally positive light and suggests that, beyond productivity, incentives can be used to improve other outcomes such as safety, quality, prosocial behaviors, and creativity, particularly when the incentives are thoughtfully designed. The review concludes with several potential fruitful areas for future research such as investigations of incentive-effect duration.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-046-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2022

Anthony Silard and Sarah Wright

This paper aims to study the differing pathways to loneliness in managers and their employees. Literature on emotions in organizational life, organizational management and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the differing pathways to loneliness in managers and their employees. Literature on emotions in organizational life, organizational management and leadership and loneliness are explored to develop and test hypotheses regarding the differential prototypical scripts that can be generative of loneliness in managers and employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 28 managers and 235 employees from a horticultural company based in Mexico were surveyed, using measures of perceived connection quality, loneliness and meaningful work to test three hypotheses.

Findings

Data from 28 managers and 235 staff indicate that while loneliness scores do not significantly differ between managers and their subordinates, the predictors of loneliness differ between managers and employees, with emotional connection and mutuality predicting loneliness in employees but not in managers.

Originality/value

This paper adds specification to the literatures on workplace loneliness, the loneliness associated with management roles, emotions in organizational life and emotions and leadership. The findings are discussed in relation to the literature on manager-subordinate relationships.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2013

Anthony Jensen

This article describes the practical and theoretical implications relating to the labor managed firm (LMF), which has been formed from an insolvent company purchased by its…

Abstract

Purpose

This article describes the practical and theoretical implications relating to the labor managed firm (LMF), which has been formed from an insolvent company purchased by its workers. The research focuses on an international comparison and the cultural context of six LMFs – two each in the United States, Spain, and Italy where legislation supports worker buyouts from insolvency. Adopting a critical theoretical approach it draws on the scholarship of industrial relations and human resource management, grounded in a historical analysis to predict when a transformative or integrative LMF will be formed.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking a case study methodology to enable an in-depth understanding of the firms internal processes and relationships the use of semi-structured interviews of blue- and white-collar workers (with the use of a translator) and the administration of a structured questionnaire are used to gather and triangulate qualitative and quantitative data. The research limitations relate to the small number of respondents in each firm, which prevented more rigorous analysis, and calls for further research with larger numbers of respondents.

Findings

The results reveal that at macro level the theoretical model predicts that the LMF will have a propensity to emerge when there are market failures, when there is support from the state and the labor movement. The type of LMF was found to depend on the national context of industrial relations. At the micro level a core set of practices were found to work together to lead to high member commitment and positive behavioral outcomes.

Social implications

The research has important social implications by informing public policy aimed at redressing the injustice to employees when a business fails and jobs and entitlements are lost.

Originality/value

The article advances an understanding of the theoretical nature of the LMF.

Details

Sharing Ownership, Profits, and Decision-Making in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-750-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Swee C. Goh

This paper proposes a framework for understanding the concept of a learning organization from a normative perspective. A questionnaire was developed to operationally measure the…

Abstract

This paper proposes a framework for understanding the concept of a learning organization from a normative perspective. A questionnaire was developed to operationally measure the described management practice attributes of a learning organization. Using a sample of four organizations and 612 subjects, support was found for three a priori predictive hypotheses derived from a conceptual framework. Implications of the results and further empirical research are discussed, especially for linking learning organization attributes to performance using larger samples and multiple measures.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

1 – 10 of 175