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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Fatima Fatima, Pius Oba and Michael Sony

The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly accelerated a shift to remote working for previously office-based employees in South Africa, impacting employee outcomes such as…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly accelerated a shift to remote working for previously office-based employees in South Africa, impacting employee outcomes such as well-being. The remote work trend is expected to continue even post the pandemic, necessitating for organizational understanding of the factors impacting employee well-being. Using the Job Demands–Resources model as the theoretical framework, this study aims to understand the role of job demands and resources as predictors of employee well-being in the pandemic context.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered online survey questionnaire was used to gather quantitative data about remote workers’ (n = 204) perceptions of specifically identified demands, resources and employee well-being. Descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation and moderated hierarchical regression were used to analyse the data.

Findings

This study found that job demands in the form of work–home conflict were associated with reduced employee well-being. Resources, namely, job autonomy, effective communication and social support were associated with increased employee well-being. Job autonomy was positively correlated to remote work frequency, and gender had a significant positive association to work–home conflict. Social support was found to moderate the relationship between work–home conflict and employee well-being. Findings suggest that organizations looking to enhance the well-being of their remote workforce should implement policies and practices that reduce the demands and increase the resources of their employees. The significant association of gender to work–home conflict suggests that greater interventions are required particularly for women. This study advances knowledge on the role of demands and resources as predictors of employee well-being of remote workforces during COVID-19 and beyond.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight on employee well-being during COVID-19 remote work. Further, the findings suggest that organizations looking to enhance the well-being of their remote workforce should implement policies and practices that reduce the demands and increase the resources of their employees. The significant association of gender to work–home conflict suggests that greater interventions are required particularly for women. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study carried out to explore the employee well-being during COVID-19 pandemic and will be beneficial to stakeholders for understanding the factors impacting employee well-being.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Akanksha Jaiswal, Santoshi Sengupta, Madhusmita Panda, Lopamudra Hati, Verma Prikshat, Parth Patel and Syed Mohyuddin

The COVID-19 pandemic and technological advancements have enabled employees to telework. Referring to this emerging phenomenon, the authors aim to examine how employees'…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic and technological advancements have enabled employees to telework. Referring to this emerging phenomenon, the authors aim to examine how employees' levels of trust in management mediated by psychological well-being impact their performance as they telework. Deploying the theoretical lens of person-environment misfit, the authors also explore the role of technostress in the trust-wellbeing-performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected from 511 full-time service sector employees across Indian organizations through a structured survey questionnaire. The proposed moderation-mediation model for this study was tested using structural equation modeling and bootstrapping method.

Findings

Structural equation modeling results indicate that trust in management significantly impacts employee performance while teleworking. While psychological well-being was observed as a significant mediator, technostress played the moderator role in the trust-performance relationship. The moderated-mediation effect of psychological well-being in the trust-performance relationship was stronger when technostress was low and weaker when technostress was high.

Research limitations/implications

The authors extend the person-environment misfit theory in the context of telework, highlighting the role of technostress that may impact the trust-wellbeing- performance relationship in such work settings.

Practical implications

The study informs leaders and managers on balancing delicate aspects such as employee trust and well-being that significantly impact performance as they telework. The authors also highlight the critical role of managers in respecting employees' personal and professional boundaries to alleviate technostress.

Originality/value

The authors make a novel theoretical contribution to the emerging literature on teleworking by examining the trust-psychological wellbeing-performance link and the role of technostress in this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2022

Huy Gip, Priyanko Guchait, Aysin Paşamehmetoğlu and Do The Khoa

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating effect of psychological well-being between organizational dehumanization and two outcome variables: service recovery…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating effect of psychological well-being between organizational dehumanization and two outcome variables: service recovery performance and service sabotage. This research also investigates whether organizational tenure moderates the relationship between organizational dehumanization and psychological well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey methodology, 200 hotel frontline service employees (FLEs) in Turkey were sampled over two time points. Additionally, employees’ direct supervisors rated their service recovery performance. The partial least squares method, specifically SmartPLS 3.3.3, was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that organizational dehumanization negatively influences employees’ psychological well-being. However, organizational tenure moderates this relationship, in which organizational dehumanization has less of a negative effect on employees’ psychological well-being in those with longer tenure. Psychological well-being was found to mediate the relationship between organizational dehumanization and service recovery performance. Finally, psychological well-being mediates the relationship between organizational dehumanization and service sabotage.

Practical implications

Managers should consider the negative effect organizational dehumanization has on FLEs’ psychological well-being and aim to establish an organizational culture that values these employees as individuals and as invaluable resources for the organization. Further, this study has found that less tenured employees are less likely to have the psychological resources to cope with organizational dehumanization and are more susceptible to decreased productivity (i.e. service recovery performance) and engaging in counterproductive work behaviors (i.e. service sabotage) due to mistreatment in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study furthers our understanding of organizational dehumanization, an understudied concept in hospitality research, which influences employee outcomes. The findings of this study contribute to the advancement of the self-determination theory and how organizational dehumanization impacts psychological well-being. It also contributes to the conservation of resources theory and current literature on service recovery performance and service sabotage.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2012

Anthony R. Wheeler and Ramchand Rampersad

In the present chapter, we explore how employee well-being changes over time, both linear and psychological during periods of economic instability. Moreover, we examine…

Abstract

In the present chapter, we explore how employee well-being changes over time, both linear and psychological during periods of economic instability. Moreover, we examine how employee job embeddedness (JE) buffers the effects of economic shocks on employee well-being, and how these buffering effects change employee perceptions of time. We theorize that employees with higher levels of JE psychologically experience economic shocks as occurring infrequently with the economically unstable period feeling quick, but employees with lower levels of JE psychologically experience economic shocks as occurring frequently with the economically unstable period feeling slow. Finally, we extend these relationships to account for the spread of employee well-being through social connections, both inside and outside of the work context. Because JE requires strong social connections, we theorize that the links component of embeddedness is responsible for economic shocks and employee well-being crossing over the work/nonwork boundary. We discuss the implications for our theoretical model.

Details

The Role of the Economic Crisis on Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-005-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2022

Wided Batat

This conceptual review paper aims to extend the human resource (HR) management literature by introducing a holistic employee experience (EMX) framework to conceptualize…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual review paper aims to extend the human resource (HR) management literature by introducing a holistic employee experience (EMX) framework to conceptualize the relationship between EMX entities and employee well-being. Thus, the EMX framework stimulates future research in HR and organizational studies by incorporating a transformative impact of experiences designed by organizations on the overall well-being of their employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the customer experience literature in the marketing literature and reviews the existing conceptualizations of the EMX construct in HR management studies, along with other disciplines through an extensive and in-depth analysis of the academic and business literature that examines EMX.

Findings

The EMX framework provides a comprehensive outlook on the relationship between EMX and well-being, where the latter is considered both a driving force and an outcome of the overall EMX. EMX is a multilevel model offering a big-picture view of how the three entities – personal, social and cultural – of the organization referring to different levels of the EMX can affect employees' well-being in terms of their functional, emotional, hedonic and eudaimonic needs.

Research limitations/implications

The EMX framework utilizes a richer definition of the EMX and highlights the need for research that bridges other disciplines and paradigms outside of and within HR management. This research develops the understanding of each component of the EMX framework with the ultimate goal of moving the field towards the EMX approach. This research identifies some unanswered questions related to a new management tool that enhances employee well-being, improves the delivered customer experience and contributes in making the current body of knowledge on the EMX more organized. The analysis of the different issues addressed by the literature suggests avenues for future research.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the HR literature and the emerging research on the EMX by presenting a comprehensive framework that incorporates a holistic understanding of the concept in the HR field. The paper offers scholars and organizations that struggle with engaging employees, a modern and practical perspective – one that helps organizations develop an in-depth understanding of today's workplaces in a globalized context to implement successful and engaging customer and EMXs.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2022

Matthew J. Xerri, Rebecca Cozens and Yvonne Brunetto

This paper uses conservation of resources theory to compare the impact of supervisor-employee relationships and the extent to which emotional contagion (EC) moderates the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses conservation of resources theory to compare the impact of supervisor-employee relationships and the extent to which emotional contagion (EC) moderates the links between psychological capital (PsyCap) and well-being for United States (US) healthcare workers.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study structural equation modeling (SEM) and analysis of variances (ANOVAs) were used to test survey data collected at two points in time from 240 US doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

Findings

The findings provide insight into why healthcare professionals, who undertake emotional labor, have a higher incidence of lower well-being and increased burnout rates compared with other jobs, except for emergency workers. The findings show that the relationship between PsyCap and well-being was different for low and high EC employees. The impact of PsyCap on well-being was greater for those with lower EC, and this means that those employees who have high EC have a greater risk of reduced well-being.

Originality/value

Traditional bureaucratic rationalist management models are inappropriate for managing those who have high EC and/or undertake emotional labor. Instead, new human resource (HR) models are needed that focus on employee well-being, and in providing greater organizational support and upskilling employees in how to cope with their emotions and to build their own reservoirs of personal support.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Bonnie Simpson, Madelynn Stackhouse and Katherine White

Although stress has become a prominent research theme in consumer behavior and occupational health, to the authors knowledge there is only one review on the relationship…

Abstract

Although stress has become a prominent research theme in consumer behavior and occupational health, to the authors knowledge there is only one review on the relationship between consumer behavior and stress (i.e., when internal and external factors exceed an individual’s resources and endangering the individual’s well-being) and this was published 10 years ago. Further, research on occupational stress has yet to be fully integrated into the consumer stress literature. In this chapter, the authors attempt to advance research on consumer stress by a drawing on a satisfaction mirror framework which outlines that consumers and employees influence each other through a “mirror” where they positively and cyclically influence each other in a service environment. The authors argue that consumers and employees may likewise mirror each other in a negative cycle of stress and well-being depletion. First, the authors describe how stress is viewed in consumer behavior and marketing. Second, the authors review evidence that consumption serves as a form of coping with stress. Third, the authors discuss the role of consumption as a stressor that may drive consumer stress. Finally, the authors introduce the satisfaction mirror model and outline the bi-directional influence on increased stress and well-being depletion at the consumer–employee interface in service encounters. The model introduced in this chapter serves as a framework for organizing findings related to stress and well-being in the fields of consumer behavior and occupational health. In addition, the model serves as a springboard for developing propositions for future research. Ultimately, the authors hope this chapter both updates and builds upon previous findings on stress and consumer behavior, as well as grounds future research on stress and well-being at the intersection of consumers and employees.

Details

Examining the Role of Well-being in the Marketing Discipline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-946-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2022

Vijay Kuriakose and Sreejesh S

The study attempts to understand the relationship between behavioural conflict and employee well-being and examines the intervening role of the negative affect state…

Abstract

Purpose

The study attempts to understand the relationship between behavioural conflict and employee well-being and examines the intervening role of the negative affect state. Besides this, the study also analyses the moderating role of workplace fun.

Design/methodology/approach

Following affective events theory, the authors developed the conceptual model and postulated the study hypotheses. A questionnaire-based survey was used to collect data from frontline employees of selected hotels in India. Further, the authors tested the hypotheses following the process approach (Hayes, 2013, 2018).

Findings

The study findings reported that behavioural conflict has a negative relationship with employee well-being, and the negative affect state mediates the relationship between behavioural conflict and employee well-being. The results also established the moderating role of workplace fun in this relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings extend the current understanding of the effect of behavioural conflict on employee well-being and explain how it influences employee well-being. The study also provides guidelines to manage the detrimental effect of behavioural conflict.

Originality/value

The study established the association between behavioural conflict and employee well-being and highlighted the process through and condition under which behavioural conflict influences employee well-being. This could be the first study examining the relationship between behavioural conflict and employee well-being.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Weilin Wu, Wynne Chin and Yide Liu

This study aims to provide a response to calls for research on the consequences of technostress among employees in smart hotels. Based on the person–environment fit and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a response to calls for research on the consequences of technostress among employees in smart hotels. Based on the person–environment fit and job demands–resources theories, the authors offer a theoretical framework and investigate how factors affect employeeswell-being and performance. Further, the authors investigate the moderating effects of organizational learning on the relationship between technostress and employee well-being and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed and empirically tested a research model based on a survey of 454 respondents in China. The effect of technostress was analyzed by applying the use of partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results support that technostress negatively affects employee well-being (e.g. engagement and overall well-being) and performance. Employee well-being mediates the relationship between technostress and performance. Organizational learning has a countervailing moderating impact on employee well-being and performance. Specifically, organizational learning significantly counteracts the relationship between technostress and performance while significantly exacerbating the relationship between technostress and engagement.

Practical implications

This study contributes to an enhanced understanding of technostress in smart hotels and provides practical recommendations for assisting hotel managers in improving employee well-being and performance.

Originality/value

This work represents an early attempt to investigate the impact of technostress on employee well-being and performance in smart hotels. The countervailing moderating effect of organizational learning on employee engagement and performance is identified. In addition, this study is an initial attempt at estimating the predictive contribution of the mediating effects of employee engagement and overall well-being in the relationship between technostress and employee performance in smart hotels.

研究目的

这项研究响应了对研究智能酒店员工存在的技术压力的号召。基于人与环境的契合和工作需求——资源理论, 我们提供了一个理论框架并调查如何影响员工的幸福感和绩效的因素。此外, 我们调查了组织学习对技术压力以及员工福利和绩效关系的调节作用。

研究设计/方法/途径

我们开发并实证检验了一项基于对中国 454 名受访者的调查的研究模型。通过应用偏最小二乘结构方程模型对技术压力的影响进行分析。

研究发现

结果显示技术压力对员工幸福感产生负面影响(例如, 参与度和整体幸福感)和绩效。员工幸福感对技术压力和绩效之间的关系有显著中介作用。组织学习对员工的幸福感和表现起到了抵消性的调节作用。具体而言, 组织学习显着抵消了技术压力和绩效之间的关系, 同时显着增加技术压力和参与度之间的关系。

实践价值

本研究有助于加深对智能酒店技术人员的理解并提供实用建议以协助酒店管理人员改善员工福利和表现。

研究原创性/价值

这项研究代表了技术压力对智能酒店员工福利和绩效影响的早期尝试。本论文确定了组织学习在员工参与度和工作表现关系之间的抵消调节作用。此外, 这项研究是探索智能酒店员工参与度以及整体幸福感在技术压力与员工绩效之间关系的中介效应的初步尝试。

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Anupama Singh and Sumi Jha

The purpose of this study is to understand the bi-directional causal relationship (regular and reverse causation) between employee well-being and organizational health…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the bi-directional causal relationship (regular and reverse causation) between employee well-being and organizational health, which is grounded in the micro-foundations of institutional theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, employee well-being has two facets: work engagement and burnout. The positive aspect of employee well-being has been conceptualized by work engagement, whereas the negative aspect has been conceptualized with the help of burnout. As concurrent triangulation method was adopted, the qualitative data, as well as quantitative data, was collected from various laboratories of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – an Indian research and development organization.

Findings

The findings did not show the existence of a symbiotic relationship between employee well-being and organizational health. The findings indicated the existence of a significant positive relationship between organizational health and employee well-being, but the reverse effect was found to be non-significant. This shows that when organizational health is good, employees’ health will also be good but not vice versa.

Originality/value

This study shows that health is not a static state, and so, at any given point in time, employee well-being cannot have a positive relationship with organizational health. Employee engagement helps enhance organizational health, whereas burnout can hinder organizational health if not properly mitigated.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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