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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Annie S. Anderson and David Cox

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food funded the project increasing vegetable and fruit consumption between 1994 and 1996. The project was carried out in three phases…

1165

Abstract

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food funded the project increasing vegetable and fruit consumption between 1994 and 1996. The project was carried out in three phases comprising a nationwide survey of attitudes towards increasing fruit and vegetable intake, a community‐based intervention trial and a workplace intervention trial. This paper reports qualitative data from focus group work with participants of the phase 2 community intervention describing some of the realities and challenges associated with achieving five a day in a free‐living setting.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Annie S. Anderson and Susan E. Morris

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food funded a two‐year project on “Constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their implications for the adoption and maintenance of…

2110

Abstract

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food funded a two‐year project on “Constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their implications for the adoption and maintenance of healthy diets”. Part of this work included a study on the impact of changing income on dietary patterns, food intake and food preferences. Results suggest that alterations in food choices relevant to health promotion occur in people who have experienced a change in income although further study is necessary to explore the longer‐term results of these actions.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Annie S. Anderson

Reviews a range of diet survey methods which are commonly utilizedby nutritionists. All methods are time‐consuming and demanding forsubjects and researchers. It is therefore…

2483

Abstract

Reviews a range of diet survey methods which are commonly utilized by nutritionists. All methods are time‐consuming and demanding for subjects and researchers. It is therefore essential that appropriate retrospective or prospective methods are selected to meet the purpose of the survey. For researchers concerned with changing dietary behaviour, stresses that information on the social context within which food is consumed should be collected as well as data on food and nutrient intake.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Annie S. Anderson, David Marshall, Mike Lean and Ann Foster

Compared with the rest of the UK, the Scots have a particularly poorreputation for eating fruit and vegetables. The reasons for this arevaried and thought to relate to climate…

1244

Abstract

Compared with the rest of the UK, the Scots have a particularly poor reputation for eating fruit and vegetables. The reasons for this are varied and thought to relate to climate, availability and poor quality, with the costs of these foods being a major barrier to dietary change. To examine this in further detail, a number of focus group discussions were carried out and key questions used in the monthly national Scottish Opinion Survey. Discusses the results, which showed that Scots are complacent about dietary change and the concept of “dietary moderation” provides good grounds for inaction. Quantitative guidelines such as the WHO (World Health Organization) recommendation to consume 400g (about five portions) of fruit and vegetables daily provide clear guidelines for dietary goals and allow diets to be planned on both on an individual and a catering level.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Richard Shepherd, Claire M. Paisley, Paul Sparks, Annie S. Anderson, Susan Eley and Mike E.J. Lean

Describes work carried out on a two‐year Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded project of the constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their implications…

3532

Abstract

Describes work carried out on a two‐year Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded project of the constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their implications for the adoption and maintenance of healthy diets. Looks at whether there are differences in diet knowledge and preferences between people on different income levels.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

David Marshall, Annie S. Anderson, Mike Lean and Ann Foster

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive toimprove Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit andvegetable consumption. Despite various…

2847

Abstract

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive to improve Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Despite various attempts, consumption remains well below World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations. Consumer confusion and complacency towards diet are apparent and the relationship between knowledge about good diet and behaviour is unclear. Highlights the need to consider how consumers make choices. Diet and health are not regarded as a problem for the majority of Scots but the major barriers to increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables reflect the additional costs incurred and the somewhat limited role for these products in Scottish cuisine. Indicates that price incentives and emphasis on the healthy benefits of eating more fruit and vegetables appear to be the most likely to succeed in increasing consumption; but there appear to be more opportunities to increase fruit as opposed to vegetable consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

David N. Cox, J. Reynolds, D.J. Mela, Annie S. Anderson, Susan McKellar and M.E.J. Lean

Reports on a three‐phase Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food‐funded study which aimed to identify beliefs and attitudes that may act as barriers to increased fruit and…

1593

Abstract

Reports on a three‐phase Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food‐funded study which aimed to identify beliefs and attitudes that may act as barriers to increased fruit and vegetable consumption and to identify strategies which could be used to encourage increased consumption through public health messages.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Karen A. Johnson

Anna Julia Cooper and Septima Poinsette Clark were two prominent late 19th- and early 20th-century educators. Cooper and Clark taught African American students in federally…

Abstract

Anna Julia Cooper and Septima Poinsette Clark were two prominent late 19th- and early 20th-century educators. Cooper and Clark taught African American students in federally sanctioned, segregated schools in the South. Drawing on womanist thought as a theoretical lens, this chapter argues that Cooper and Clark’s intellectual thoughts on race, racism, education, and pedagogy informed their teaching practices. Influenced by their socio-cultural, historical, familial, and education, they implemented antioppressionist pedagogical practices as a way to empower their students and address the educational inequalities their students were subjected to in a highly racialized, violent, and repressive social order. Historical African American women educators’ social critiques on race and racism are rarely examined, particularly as they pertain to how their critiques influence their teaching practices. Cooper and Clark’s critiques about race and racism are pertinent to the story of education and racial empowerment during the Jim Crow era.

Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2018

Laura McKendy

This research explores the subjective health experiences of women incarcerated in a provincial detention center in Ottawa, Canada.

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the subjective health experiences of women incarcerated in a provincial detention center in Ottawa, Canada.

Methodology/approach

Narrative interviews conducted with 16 previously incarcerated women were analyzed to explore how health issues shaped their experiences in detention.

Findings

Women identified a set of practices and conditions that negatively impacted health, including the denial of medication, medical treatment, and healthcare, limited prenatal healthcare, and damaged health caused by poor living conditions.

Research limitations/implications

Findings suggest that structural health problems emerge in penal environments where healthcare is provided by the same agency responsible for incarceration. The incompatibility between the mandates of incarceration and healthcare suggests that responsibility for institutional healthcare should be transferred to provincial healthcare bodies.

Originality/value

This research responds to the lack of research on carceral health experiences within both penal scholarship and medical sociology, particularly in relation to women and those confined in jails.

Details

Gender, Women’s Health Care Concerns and Other Social Factors in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-175-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

John H. Bickford III and Cynthia W. Rich

Common Core State Standards Initiative mandates increased readings of informational texts within English Language Arts starting in elementary school. Accurate, age-appropriate…

Abstract

Common Core State Standards Initiative mandates increased readings of informational texts within English Language Arts starting in elementary school. Accurate, age-appropriate, and engaging content is at the center of effective social studies teaching. Textbooks and children’s literature—both literary and informational—are prominent in elementary classrooms because of the esoteric nature of primary source material. Many research projects have investigated historical accuracy and representation within textbooks, but few have done so with children’s trade books. We examined children’s trade books centered on three historical figures frequently incorporated within elementary school curricula: Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosa Parks, and Helen Keller. Findings revealed various forms of historical misrepresentation and differing levels of historicity. Reporting such lacunae is important for those involved in curricular decisions. We believe children’s books, even those with historical omissions and misrepresentations, provide an unique opportunity for students to incorporate and scrutinize diverse perspectives as they actively assemble historical understandings. All secondary narratives, even historically representative children’s books, can benefit from primary source supplementation. We guide teachers interested in employing relevant and rich primary source material.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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1 – 10 of 221