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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Annette Kluge, Arnulf Sebastian Schüffler, Christof Thim, Jennifer Haase and Norbert Gronau

Insight has grown that for an organization to learn and change successfully, forgetting and unlearning are required. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the relevant…

Abstract

Purpose

Insight has grown that for an organization to learn and change successfully, forgetting and unlearning are required. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the relevant existing body of empirical research on forgetting and unlearning, to encourage research using a greater variety of methods and to contribute to a more complementary body of empirical work by using designs and instruments with a stronger reference to previous studies.

Design/methodology/approach

As the number of theoretical papers clearly exceeds the number of empirical papers, the present paper deals with the main insights based on the empirical state of research on unlearning and forgetting. So far, these empirical results have shown relationships between unlearning and other organizational outcomes such as innovation on an organizational level, but many of the other proposed relationships have not been investigated. The authors presents suggestion to apply a larger variety of qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods in organizational research.

Findings

Unlearning and forgetting research can benefit both from more diverse theoretical questions addressed in research and from a more complementary body of empirical work that applies methods, designs and instruments that refer to previous research designs and results. To understand and manage unlearning and forgetting, empirical work should relate to and expand upon previous empirical work to form a more coherent understanding of empirical results.

Originality/value

The paper presents a variety of research designs and methods that can be applied within the research context of understanding the nature of organizational forgetting and unlearning. Additionally, it illustrates the potential for different methods, such as experience sampling methods, which capture the temporal aspects of forgetting and unlearning.

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2020

Vera Hagemann, Greta Ontrup and Annette Kluge

This paper aims to explore the influence of collective orientation (CO) on coordination and team performance for interdependently working teams while controlling for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of collective orientation (CO) on coordination and team performance for interdependently working teams while controlling for person-related and team variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 58 two-person-teams participated in a simulation-based firefighting task. The laboratory study took 2 h for each team. The effects of CO in tasks of increasing complexity were investigated under the consideration of control variables, and the relations between CO, coordination and team performance were assessed using a multivariate latent growth curve modeling approach and by estimating indirect effects in simple mediation models.

Findings

Team members high on CO performed significantly better than low-scoring members. The effect of CO on team performance was independent from an increasing task complexity, whereas the effect of CO on coordination was not. The effect of CO on team performance was mediated by coordination within the team, and the positive relation between CO and performance persists when including group efficacy into the model.

Research limitations/implications

As CO is a modifiable person-related variable and important for effective team processes, additional research on factors influencing this attitude during work is assumed to be valuable.

Practical implications

CO is especially important for highly interdependently working teams in high-risk-organizations such as the fire service or nuclear power plants, where errors lead to severe consequences for human beings or the environment.

Originality/value

No other studies showed the importance of CO for coordination and team performance while considering teamwork-relevant variables and the interdependence of work.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Greta Ontrup, Pia Sophie Schempp and Annette Kluge

The purpose of this paper is to explore how positive organizational behaviors, specifically team proactivity, can be captured through digital data and what determines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how positive organizational behaviors, specifically team proactivity, can be captured through digital data and what determines content validity of these data. The aim is to enable scientifically rigorous HR analytics projects for measuring and managing organizational behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Results are derived from interview data (N = 24) with team members, HR professionals and consultants of HR software.

Findings

Based on inductive qualitative content analysis, the authors clustered six data types generated/recorded by 13 different technological applications that were proposed to be informative of team proactivity. Four determinants of content validity were derived.

Practical implications

The overview of technological applications and resulting data types can stimulate diverse HR analytics projects, which can contribute to organizational performance. The authors suggest ways to control for the threats to content validity in the design of HR analytics or research projects.

Originality/value

HR analytics projects in the application field of managing organizational behavior are rare. This paper provides starting points for choosing data to measure team proactivity as one form of organizational behavior and guidelines for ensuring their validity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2012

Vera Hagemann, Annette Kluge and Sandrina Ritzmann

The purpose of the present study is to introduce the elements characterising the work context of high responsibility teams (HRTs) operating in high reliability contexts…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to introduce the elements characterising the work context of high responsibility teams (HRTs) operating in high reliability contexts such as medicine or aviation. Based on these elements, the authors reflected on the function of teamwork in these contexts, which is strongly dominated by a notion of flexibility under complexity, based on the technical, normative, and governance dimensions of teamwork.

Design/methodology/approach

Problem‐centred interviews (n=11) based on semi‐structured guidelines were conducted. Subsequently, a survey was conducted using a questionnaire inventory in six different HRT work contexts (n=551).

Findings

The interviews and survey results show significant differences regarding, for example, hierarchy or stress posed on the HRTs. However, they also demonstrate relevant similarities regarding, for instance, dimensions of complexity occurring in the teamwork contexts. Both differences and similarities influence how the support systems of the teamwork dimensions should be set up.

Research limitations/implications

The study provided an excellent overview of similar and differing characteristics of the work context of different HRTs. However, it represents six specific HRTs and might not be generalisable to teams in other high reliability organisations, such as in the energy sector.

Practical implications

It is recommended that the characteristics of work contexts in HRTs should be taken into account in order to set up support systems of teamwork dimensions that enable teams to transfer the prevalent safety discourse into safety practice.

Originality/value

The innovative approach, which combines qualitative and quantitative data, provided insights that can be used to support team functioning in the team's specific work context.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Michael Seadle

Who knows what scholarly gems lie behind the iron doors of research library stacks in what used to be called “East” Germany? Today anyone with a network connection and a…

Abstract

Who knows what scholarly gems lie behind the iron doors of research library stacks in what used to be called “East” Germany? Today anyone with a network connection and a Web browser can know at least some of the answers, thanks to a major automation effort.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Annette Krauss

This paper aims to report on findings and methodological approaches of the artistic project “Sites for Unlearning (Art Organization)” in collaboration with the Team at…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on findings and methodological approaches of the artistic project “Sites for Unlearning (Art Organization)” in collaboration with the Team at Casco at Institute: Working for the Commons, Utrecht/NL, through which processes of unlearning are tested against the backdrop of established institutional structures. This paper constitutes a transdisciplinary contribution to the discourse, exploring its relationship with organizational unlearning, organizational change and feminist, decolonial trajectories.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a feminist, decolonial, arts-based approach to discuss “unlearning institutional habits” by means of the long-term project – Sites for Unlearning (Art Organization). This complements the organizational unlearning literature with an arts-based approach, which draws on alternative education and feminist and decolonial literature. This paper responds to the call of this special and introduces a new perspective to the discourse.

Findings

This paper gives insights into and elaborates on the findings of the artistic project “Site for Unlearning (Art Organization)” through which processes of unlearning are tested against the backdrop of institutional structures.

Originality/value

This methodology puts in evidence that there are two major areas of concern for those who desire to break established structures in contemporary life increasingly defined by economic, socio-political and ecological pressures – institution on the one hand and learning on the other; the artistic project Sites for Unlearning attempts to challenge both. It builds on the insights and energies developed in and around the studies on unlearning in the fields of alternative education and feminist and decolonial theory and connects them with organizational learning, knowledge management and theories of transformation (Andreotti, 2011; Spivak, 1993; Tlostanova and Mignolo, 2012).

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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