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Abstract

Details

Designing and Tracking Knowledge Management Metrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-723-3

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Larraine Segil

To show how the key to successfully managing alliances is developing and implementing alliance metrics.

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Abstract

Purpose

To show how the key to successfully managing alliances is developing and implementing alliance metrics.

Design/methodology/approach

The case of “Acme Manufacturing” (a composite of several firms) is used to illustrate the theory and reasoning behind the creation and tracking of alliance metrics appropriate to the life cycle of the partnership. These ideas are then applied to the ongoing Avnet/HP alliance.

Findings

Understanding and applying unique metrics at each stage allows management to anticipate alliance challenges and increase flexibility and adaptability when faced with changing economic and market conditions. Across the life cycle stages the partners must learn to monitor two types of measurements – development metrics, commonly employed in the start‐up and high growth stages, and implementation metrics, engaged throughout the professional, mature, decline, and sustain stages of the life cycle.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study produced by a consultant specializing in alliance management. It has been peer reviewed but has not been subjected to independent audit.

Practical implications

Proactively managing alliances helps partners ensure value extraction, financial and non‐financial. Development metrics and implementation metrics can help alliance stakeholders understand and plan for the stages of the alliance life cycle while considering their knowledge transfer.

Originality/value

As the cases of Acme Manufacturing and Avnet/HP show, an understanding of alliance life cycles, cultures, and metrics can lead to successful planning, launching, and maintenance of a company's alliances.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Frank A. Buytendijk

Measurement drives behavior. Unfortunately, most performance measurement initiatives overlook this fact. Implementations are performed top‐down with strategy as the

Abstract

Purpose

Measurement drives behavior. Unfortunately, most performance measurement initiatives overlook this fact. Implementations are performed top‐down with strategy as the starting‐point. There needs to be a better understanding of the cultural context of the metrics (What is driving the behaviors?) and a better understanding of what metrics are to define (How do we drive the right behaviors through measurement?). The purpose of this paper is to explore the notion of a context‐based approach to performance metrics – by examining an organization's negative values – and the notion of a content‐based approach – by introducing the concept of business interface metrics.

Design/methodology/approach

The article analyses business metrics.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the need to use interface metrics in order to better manager processes and deliver organizational values.

Originality/value

To get new insights, sometimes conventional wisdom needs to be challenged. Following best practices around metrics can prevent companies from reflecting on the effect of the metrics they are trying to put in place. By coming up with a different approach (business interface metrics and negative values), interesting insights can be gained. Moreover, taking a fresh approach ensures that new thinking takes place and that there are fewer conformist paths to fall back on.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Mahmoud O. Elish, Mojeeb AL‐Rahman AL‐Khiaty and Mohammad Alshayeb

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between some aspect‐oriented metrics and aspect fault proneness, content and fixing effort.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between some aspect‐oriented metrics and aspect fault proneness, content and fixing effort.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study was conducted using an open source aspect‐oriented software consisting of 76 aspects, and 13 aspect‐oriented metrics were investigated that measure different structural properties of an aspect: size, coupling, cohesion, and inheritance. In addition, different prediction models for aspect fault proneness, content and fixing effort were built using different combinations of metrics' categories.

Findings

The results obtained from this study indicate statistically significant correlation between most of the size metrics and aspect fault proneness, content and fixing effort. The cohesion metric was also found to be significantly correlated with the same. Moreover, it was observed that the best accuracy in aspect fault proneness, content and fixing effort prediction can be achieved as a function of some size metrics.

Originality/value

Fault prediction helps software developers to focus their quality assurance activities and to allocate the needed resources for these activities more effectively and efficiently; thus improving software reliability. In literature, some aspect‐oriented metrics have been evaluated for aspect fault proneness prediction, but not for other fault‐related prediction problems such as aspect fault content and fixing effort.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Vanessa Goldoni and Mírian Oliveira

The main goal of this research is to analyze knowledge management (KM) evaluation metrics in software development companies in Brazil through the perception of managers and users.

1965

Abstract

Purpose

The main goal of this research is to analyze knowledge management (KM) evaluation metrics in software development companies in Brazil through the perception of managers and users.

Design/methodology/approach

The method applied was a multiple case study in two information technology companies in Brazil.

Findings

According to the KM objectives and motivations, each company selects an implementation approach that results in specific challenges. The results show that the differences in Company A and Company B can be related to the KM process adopted. Based on the perception of the interviewees, it is possible to affirm that the relevance of a metric depends on the organization's context and the existence of a structured KM process.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions are based on two case studies of Brazilian IT companies. There could be industry‐specific issues as well as national cultural and behavioral values that might affect the findings and conclusions.

Practical implications

According to the interviewees, the set of process metrics can be linked to the KM process phases and the organizations should contemplate both quantitative and qualitative metrics. The entire set of metrics and its observations in this work can be used as a starting‐point for the selection of the most adequate metrics for each organization.

Originality/value

The research associated the identified metrics in the literature with the knowledge management process phases of creation, storage, dissemination, utilization, and measurement.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2022

Joachim Stocker, Nils Herda and Jan Jürjens

Enterprises often face a wide variety of adverse events. Adverse events can have negative effects on organizations like failures of resources. In case resources fail, they…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprises often face a wide variety of adverse events. Adverse events can have negative effects on organizations like failures of resources. In case resources fail, they are not available and cannot perform the assigned work. Enterprises are therefore especially interested in how resilient processes and workflows are in case adverse events occur and resources may fail. For this purpose, process resilience measurement approaches are needed.

Design/methodology/approach

To measure the resilience of processes and workflows, a life cycle and five quantitative metrics have been developed. The metrics have been validated using five real-world production and logistics cases to show their applicability on process models and paths. Furthermore, workshops have been conducted with professionals to get additional feedback on the contributions.

Findings

Based on the results obtained from applying the metrics to five real-world cases, view-based resilience improvements can be derived. Overall, only one of the five real-world cases can be considered as completely resilient. Furthermore, the metrics and life cycle have been especially valued by professionals with respect to transparency, independency, comparability as well as the ability to determine critical process paths.

Originality/value

Several authors have dealt with different aspects related to the measurement of business processes, resilience or a combination thereof. However, a life cycle or metrics to quantitatively measure the resilience of processes by considering resources has not been found yet. The life cycle and metrics are therefore novel. As a future research direction, they can be applied in different domains for further validation purposes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Amy Muller, Liisa Välikangas and Paul Merlyn

During the past year, the authors have built a framework for a suite of metrics that senior managers can customize to track and promote innovation success in their companies.

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Abstract

Purpose

During the past year, the authors have built a framework for a suite of metrics that senior managers can customize to track and promote innovation success in their companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Senior executives can use the suite of metrics to assess their company's innovativeness over time and hence combat the insidious strategy decay that often afflicts a company's business.

Findings

The framework combines three views on innovation – resource, capability, and leadership – providing the perspective to develop a suite of metrics for assessing and developing a company's capacity for innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The optimal selection of metrics and the optimal value or “sweet spot” of any particular metric will vary from company to company.

Practical implications

As more firms develop strategic innovation metrics and a database that validates their relevance, top managers will learn to assess and guide a company's innovation capability more effectively.

Originality/value

This is the first strategic guideline for building a customizable system of innovation metrics.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Jeff Smith

Brand metrics are more than just a vehicle to gauge success. They are a vehicle to guide success.

Abstract

Brand metrics are more than just a vehicle to gauge success. They are a vehicle to guide success.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

Abstract

Details

A Sustainability Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-481-3

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Lai Ma

This paper examines the socio-political affordances of metrics in research evaluation and the consequences of epistemic injustice in research practices and recorded knowledge.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the socio-political affordances of metrics in research evaluation and the consequences of epistemic injustice in research practices and recorded knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the use of metrics is examined as a mechanism that promotes competition and social acceleration. Second, it is argued that the use of metrics in a competitive research culture reproduces systemic inequalities and leads to epistemic injustice. The conceptual analysis draws on works of Hartmut Rosa and Miranda Fricker, amongst others.

Findings

The use of metrics is largely driven by competition such as university rankings and league tables. Not only that metrics are not designed to enrich academic and research culture, they also suppress the visibility and credibility of works by minorities. As such, metrics perpetuate epistemic injustice in knowledge practices; at the same time, the reliability of metrics for bibliometric and scientometric studies is put into question.

Social implications

As metrics leverage who can speak and who will be heard, epistemic injustice is reflected in recorded knowledge and what we consider to be information.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the discussion of metrics beyond bibliometric studies and research evaluation. It argues that metrics-induced competition is antithetical to equality and diversity in research practices.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 78 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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