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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Angela Hall, Neil Towers and Duncan R. Shaw

The shopper journey can cross a number of channels leading up to the point of a possible purchase, which may be unseen by the retailer or brand for the targeted purchase…

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Abstract

Purpose

The shopper journey can cross a number of channels leading up to the point of a possible purchase, which may be unseen by the retailer or brand for the targeted purchase. The purpose of this paper is to gain a greater understanding of the decision making and purchase intention activity for online Millennial shoppers in deciding what fashion garments to buy in the digital retail environment. The paper also investigates the use of technology and social media involvement in the shopper journey leading up to the point of purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with other studies that investigated online shopper behaviour (Balabanis and Reynolds, 2001; Pavlou et al., 2007), the authors have undertaken an exploratory investigation using an online survey conducted with respondents sourced through using Survey Monkey Audience. The survey was conducted with over 580 respondents (49.7 per cent female and 50.3 per cent male) between 16 and 34 years old living in England.

Findings

The findings highlight a picture of shoppers going on very different shopper journeys with different lengths, influenced by different touch points and using different media and devices. Each customer has their own individual experience and expectation. They can move through extremely diverse, long and complicated journeys in the buying process before they purchase a product. Most striking is their willingness to reach out and be influenced by other people beyond the control of any retailer – using platforms that are not necessarily specifically related with any retailer. Shoppers can undertake numerous activities before they make their final purchase decision, seeking content from different retailers, asking for social validation of their decision from their social networks both online and offline which is often out of sight of the retailer or brand.

Practical implications

The findings show how retailers and brands can understand the shopper decision journey and their behaviours across all the devices and channels that are used. Moreover, for some or part of the digital journey the shopper can often be unseen by the retailer or brand.

Originality/value

Consumers actively seek out novelty, knowledge and inspiration but shoppers employ a variety of interactions over a much greater period of time to arrive at the moment of purchase. This research provides an insight into the range of complex views and positions held by each individual to get a much more complete picture of where shoppers are looking to buy and what are their interests.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Dwight D. Frink, Angela T. Hall, Alexa A. Perryman, Annette L. Ranft, Wayne A. Hochwarter, Gerald R. Ferris and M. Todd Royle

Accountability is ubiquitous in social systems, and its necessity is magnified in formal organizations, whose purpose has been argued to predict and control behavior. The…

Abstract

Accountability is ubiquitous in social systems, and its necessity is magnified in formal organizations, whose purpose has been argued to predict and control behavior. The very notion of organizing necessitates answering to others, and this feature implies an interface of work and social enterprises, the individuals comprising them, and subunits from dyads to divisions. Because the nature of workplace accountability is multi-level as well as interactive, single-level conceptualizations of the phenomenon are incomplete and inherently misleading. In response, this chapter sets forth a meso-level conceptualization of accountability, which develops a more comprehensive understanding of this pervasive and imperative phenomenon. The meso model presented integrates contemporary theory and research, and extends our perspectives beyond individual, group, unit, or organizational perspectives toward a unitary whole. Following this is a description of challenges and opportunities facing scholars conducting accountability research (e.g., data collection and analysis and non-traditional conceptualizations of workplace phenomenon). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed, as are directions for future research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-004-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Judith M. Hall and Angela Fairney

In this article an audit of the service provided by our osteoporosis clinic at St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington, is described. The aim was to assess the quality of the…

Abstract

In this article an audit of the service provided by our osteoporosis clinic at St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington, is described. The aim was to assess the quality of the service and to identify deficiencies that could be improved upon. It extended into primary care, and included an enquiry into patient satisfaction. From April to October 1995 154 patients (of whom 150 were female) were referred to the clinic. Of these 118 required a bone density measurement and 34% of patients had osteoporosis. The general practitioners (GPs) were satisfied with the waiting time for appointments and the standard of advice and treatment (>90%) but the standard set for communication was not achieved. The inadequate premises for the clinic did not deter the patients from documenting their satisfaction with the service provided. Subsequently, improvements have been made. We conclude that an osteoporosis clinic is an important part of the shared care approach to prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Angela Hall, Stacy Hickox, Jennifer Kuan and Connie Sung

Barriers to employment are a significant issue in the United States and abroad. As civil rights legislation continues to be enforced and as employers seek to diversify…

Abstract

Barriers to employment are a significant issue in the United States and abroad. As civil rights legislation continues to be enforced and as employers seek to diversify their workplaces, it is incumbent upon the management field to offer insights that address obstacles to work. Although barriers to employment have been addressed in various fields such as psychology and economics, management scholars have addressed this issue in a piecemeal fashion. As such, our review will offer a comprehensive, integrative model of barriers to employment that addresses both individual and organizational perspectives. We will also address societal-level concerns involving these barriers. An integrative perspective is necessary for research to progress in this area because many individuals with barriers to employment face multiple challenges that prevent them from obtaining and maintaining full employment. While the additive, or possibly multiplicative, effect of employment barriers have been acknowledged in related fields like rehabilitation counseling and vocational psychology, the Human Resource Management (HRM) literature has virtually ignored this issue. We discuss suggestions for the reduction or elimination of barriers to employment. We also provide an integrative model of employment barriers that addresses the mutable (amenable to change) nature of some barriers, while acknowledging the less mutable nature of others.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Wajda Wikhamn and Angela T. Hall

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate how perceived organizational support (POS) moderates accountability's relationship with job satisfaction.

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2015

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how perceived organizational support (POS) moderates accountability's relationship with job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-report data were collected from one organizational sample from the USA and one organizational sample from Sweden.

Findings

The results support the hypothesis that POS moderates the relationship between accountability and job satisfaction in the two samples. Specifically, the findings show that accountability relates positively to satisfaction under high support conditions and, in one sample, negatively to satisfaction under low support condition.

Research limitations/implications

The current results suggest that social context is vital to a more informed evaluation of how accountability relates to work outcomes. Organizations should show their employees that they care about them. This can be achieved through starting, maintaining, and nurturing those initiatives that are interpreted positively by the employees.

Social implications

Scandals represent examples of accountability failures. The implications of these scandals are not merely limited to individual companies and their employees. The wellbeing of the employees is part of the wellbeing of the society.

Originality/value

This study offers new insights on the relationship between accountability and job satisfaction. First, it demonstrates how organizational support perception functions as a moderator of this relationship. Second, it reports replicable results from two organizational samples – one from North America and one from Europe.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Gerald R. Ferris, Michael G. Bowen, Darren C. Treadway, Wayne A. Hochwarter, Angela T. Hall and Pamela L. Perrewé

Theory and method are inherently intertwined in the creation and maintenance of most areas of scientific inquiry. The organizational sciences, in general, and the…

Abstract

Theory and method are inherently intertwined in the creation and maintenance of most areas of scientific inquiry. The organizational sciences, in general, and the occupational stress area, in particular, are no exceptions. In this paper, we argue that an implicit supposition of linear independent–dependent variable forms has driven both theory and method, and as such, presents a characterization of organizational science and stress scholarship that is incomplete at best. We also review stress literature that has acknowledged the potential for nonlinear stressor–strain associations and offer empirical examples of both restricted and non-restricted nonlinearity. We conclude by offering prescriptions for scholars conducting research that extends beyond the examination of linear forms exclusively.

Details

Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4

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Abstract

Details

Reflections on Sociology of Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-643-3

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Abstract

Details

Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

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872

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-004-9

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