Search results

1 – 10 of 890
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2019

Andrew H. Kelly, Jasper Brown and Aaron Strickland

This paper aims to not only disentangle the recently altered law and policy on coastal management in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, but also raise opportunities for fresh ideas…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to not only disentangle the recently altered law and policy on coastal management in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, but also raise opportunities for fresh ideas to develop when dealing with both existing and future coastal damage. The focus is on the role of local government which is not only closer to concerned citizens but also faces costal damage on its own doorstep.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the topic from the beginnings of relevant statutory law to the current situation, supported by a case study. It is transdisciplinary in nature, encompassing land use and coastal legislation.

Findings

The narrative encourages further attention to the key issues at the local level. This is underpinned by the need for planners to move beyond zoning and other restrictive mechanisms to more strategic approaches. All levels of government must recognise that regulatory planning on its own is insufficient. This leads to the need for champions to consider opportunities beyond the ordinary.

Originality/value

While this paper will add to a growing literature on coastal damage and action at the local level, its emphasis on the benefits and limitations of the changing statutory system will assist not only policy makers but professional officers at the local forefront.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Barrie Gunter

Television has long been cited by viewers as their primary and most trusted source of news, especially in relation to news of national and international affairs. Aims to explore…

3484

Abstract

Purpose

Television has long been cited by viewers as their primary and most trusted source of news, especially in relation to news of national and international affairs. Aims to explore the issue of trust in the television news.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines narrative and analysis. Questions whether public trust in the BBC was damaged by the Hutton inquiry: would the BBC's reputation as the nation's premier news service be tarnished in the longer‐term and had public trust in journalism been severely compromised.

Findings

Events that followed the transmission of a report about the veracity of the government's case for going to war carried by a BBC radio news broadcast on 29 May 2003 called into question the Corporation's competence as a reliable news provider. The story alleged that an informed source had told BBC correspondent Andrew Gilligan that the government had exaggerated the immediacy of dangers posed to the west by Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction. The source who was eventually exposed was a Ministry of Defence expert on Iraq, Dr David Kelly, who later killed himself. The Prime Minister ordered a public inquiry into Dr Kelly's death, led by Lord Hutton, who severely criticised the competence of the BBC's senior management and the quality of its journalism practices. These conclusions prompted the resignation of the Corporation's Chairman and Director General. Hutton's findings had wider implications for the future governance of the BBC and invoked far‐reaching questions about the trust that the public could place in journalism. The evidence indicates that while the public felt that the BBC had been culpable for failing to launch its own internal inquiry into the Gilligan report, the public perceived this incident as a one‐off aberration rather than as being symptomatic of some wider malaise. Indeed, the Hutton inquiry had impacted more upon public trust in the government and led people to question the independence of the Hutton inquiry.

Practical implications

While trust in journalists is far from universal, the public differentiate among journalists in terms of the news organisations they work for. Among these, the BBC remains one of the most widely trusted.

Originality/value

An exploration of the issue of trust in the television news following the Dr David Kelly/Andrew Gilligan report on “The Today Programme” and subsequent Hutton enquiry.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Tom P. Abeles

The purpose of this paper is as follows: this is a short excursion into the changing world of post‐secondary education through a review of two books: Reinventing Higher Education

417

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is as follows: this is a short excursion into the changing world of post‐secondary education through a review of two books: Reinventing Higher Education: The Promise of Innovation, by Ben Wildavsky, Andrew P Kelly and Kevin Carey; and DIY U, by Aya Kamenetz.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents reviews of two recently published books.

Findings

The economics and functions of post secondary education at the baccalaureate and post‐baccalaureate (research) levels are changing in a world where knowledge flows freely across geo‐political boundaries. The Ivory Tower no longer commands from a fixed location or as the center of knowledge, both the historic and the new.

Originality/value

Individuals as well as public and private sector entities have multiple sources for knowledge and new abilities of sharing and obtaining knowledge. “The Academy” as created in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as an independent home for scholarly endeavors has changed as new demands are placed upon the institutions and the faculty.

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Clive Long and Kelly Jones

Although smoking is a major health problem among forensic psychiatric inpatient populations, a multitude of factors (motivational, environmental, procedural and psychiatric…

Abstract

Although smoking is a major health problem among forensic psychiatric inpatient populations, a multitude of factors (motivational, environmental, procedural and psychiatric) militate against effective treatment. Despite this, few studies have reported on the use of population‐appropriate treatment approaches. This pilot study reports the results of group and individual treatments involving combination nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), motivational enhancement therapy (MET) and cognitive behavioural treatment. The importance of selecting patients with some skills in emotional regulation is highlighted, along with ways of reducing institutional obstacles to change and maximising environmental support for quit attempts.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Andrew Kelly

Personnel and HRM must face up to the challenge of the Government′sCitizen′s Charter and the implications of BS5750. Looks at the role ofHR professionals in local authorities and…

535

Abstract

Personnel and HRM must face up to the challenge of the Government′s Citizen′s Charter and the implications of BS5750. Looks at the role of HR professionals in local authorities and how areas of operation will alter. The importance of justifying their role in the changes will be a major requirement and the correct tools and systems to be used will be needed.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Andrew Kelly

From TQM we have learned that everything can and should bemeasured. Managers are now asking to be shown what difference trainingand development activities make to the…

Abstract

From TQM we have learned that everything can and should be measured. Managers are now asking to be shown what difference training and development activities make to the effectiveness of the business. To demonstrate the change brought about by training and development it is necessary to measure the difference between the employee′s performance before and after the event or programme. Offers managers an evaluation model – which is the outcome of a 12‐month study into evaluation best practice across the major Scottish companies‐and a range of evaluation tools to apply to HR activity within their own organizations which will allow measurement of the return on HR investment. Offers guidance in the area of Investors in People which has been causing difficulties for HR managers.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Andrew Kelly

Reports on how the Human Resource (HR) professional can provehis/her input towards the bottom line of the company a subject whichundermines their credibility on the management…

1958

Abstract

Reports on how the Human Resource (HR) professional can prove his/her input towards the bottom line of the company a subject which undermines their credibility on the management team. Suggests that direct correlation between HR and its payback to the company is difficult to evaluate due to its reputation as a “people changer” rather than a “business improver”. Proposes five steps towards facilitating measurement of HRD payback. Suggests that these will show the true value of Human Resource Development to a company in financial terms.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Andrew H. Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore the historical background and current approach of the most common statutory instrument to maintain green landscapes in private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore the historical background and current approach of the most common statutory instrument to maintain green landscapes in private residential gardens in cities and townships in suburban New South Wales (NSW), Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The narrative presents a transdisciplinary study. While its emphasis is on law and town planning, it also encompasses local government and legal history while touching upon environmental management and ecological science. This panoply of areas reflects the sheer complexity of the topic. While the presentation is initially descriptive, it moves on to a critique of the NSW Government's recent statutory approach.

Findings

The paper demands that further attention must be paid to improving the design and architecture of statutory plans and underlying policies to not only improve urban biodiversity but also retain, as far as practicable, the visual beauty of the suburban landscape. This means reliance on local government to devise their own acceptable approaches. Flexibility rather than rigidity is warranted.

Originality/value

The amount of scholarly material on this topic is relatively rare. The majority of information relies on excellent on-ground research and experience on the part of local experts, namely council employees and consultants. Academic and practical material must be drawn together to improve biodiversity conservation at both the local and regional spheres.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 16 May 2018

Emerging market asset gyrations.

Expert briefing
Publication date: 14 February 2019

The emerging Democratic presidential candidate field and economic policy ideas before 2020.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB241862

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
1 – 10 of 890