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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2022

Raphael Oriaghe Oseghale, Dennis Pepple, Simeon Emezana Ifere and Amarachi Ngozi Amaugo

Given that institutional and cultural factors affect the transfer of HRM practices between multinational companies (MNCs) and their subsidiaries, the paper set out to investigate…

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Abstract

Purpose

Given that institutional and cultural factors affect the transfer of HRM practices between multinational companies (MNCs) and their subsidiaries, the paper set out to investigate the explanatory mechanism for the replication of transferred HRM practices and the factors likely to influence the choice of transfer mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an exploratory qualitative approach, 40 interviews were conducted with senior managers and employees in two MNC subsidiaries located in the alcoholic beverage and oil industries in Nigeria.

Findings

The findings suggest that organizational culture (OC) was the mechanism for MNC HRM replication and inhibition. In addition to explaining the mechanisms for HRM practice replication, the authors developed a conceptual framework to explain how clan and hierarchical OC influence the extent to which human resource (HR) practices are replicated or inhibited and how institutional and cultural factors influence the choice of OC.

Originality/value

The study uncovered that MNCs deploy hierarchical OC to oversee the replication of transferred practices. Interestingly, the authors found that institutional and cultural environments were key factors that influenced the choice of mechanism for overseeing the replication of HR practices. The conceptual framework can help managers of MNCs to understand how to replicate transferred HRM practices in developing countries.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Paul Agu Igwe, Mahfuzur Rahman, Paschal Ohalehi, Amarachi Amaugo and Julian Amalachukwu Anigbo

Responsive educational approaches focus on a set of well-designed practices intended to create engaging, social cohesion, better knowledge outcomes and excellent students’…

Abstract

Purpose

Responsive educational approaches focus on a set of well-designed practices intended to create engaging, social cohesion, better knowledge outcomes and excellent students’ experience. Therefore, this paper aims to engage in the discourse of the intersection of psych-sociology of learning and student’s engagement, connected to the sense of belonging and theory of planned behaviour (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

By applying an ethnographic approach and interviews of 45 international students from three UK business schools, it proposes that a sense of “belongingness” is a prerequisite for learning, personal and professional development. Owing to the exploratory nature of the subject, the use of qualitative methodology turned out to be particularly useful. Indeed, the conduct of in-depth semi-structured interviews, participative observation enabled us to access perceptions of students and compare different points of view.

Findings

The findings indicate that international students measure their experience by “sense of belonging”, integration and engagement on many interrelated and influential factors. English proficiency and employability skills are the major concerns. The kinds of support they received from their faculties and the quality of feedback from tutors are important for international studies integration and sense of belonging.

Originality/value

The findings of the critical elements of the engagement and experience of international students have both policy and practical implications given the high demand for UK universities by foreign students. Although, this paper is based on findings from UK higher education institutions, the insights are of relevance to many countries such as Australia, Canada, Germany, France and the USA, who have a significant proportion of overseas students.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Majd Megheirkouni, Amarachi Amaugo and Shehu Jallo

The purpose of this paper is to identify the required leadership styles and skills for stadium management, and examine the relationship between transformational and transactional…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the required leadership styles and skills for stadium management, and examine the relationship between transformational and transactional leadership styles and the skills approach: technical, human and conceptual skills.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative methods approach was used to gather the data, using a sample of 212 registered individuals in stadium settings.

Findings

The results revealed that there are significant relationships between leadership styles and the skills approach: technical, human and conceptual skills. More importantly, leadership styles were found to be equally important even though the effect between these styles and the skills approach: technical, human and conceptual skills, varied in the three levels of management. Further details have been reported in the results.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides an insight into the relationship between leadership styles and the required skills, using a quantitative methods approach. While this is an appropriate method, in-depth interviews are needed to understand why/why questions in stadium settings.

Practical implications

Managers should be carefully selected in the three levels of management because unqualified people can have negative consequences on the reputation of a stadium and the hosting of major events. An effective selection program focusing on mid-level managers is essential.

Originality/value

This research represents the first attempt to investigate and understand the relationship between leadership styles and the required skills, using evidence from stadium settings.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Amarachi Amaugo

The implications arising from the underrepresentation of women and inequality of female participation in leadership and senior management positions continues to challenge many

Abstract

The implications arising from the underrepresentation of women and inequality of female participation in leadership and senior management positions continues to challenge many sectors of the economy and transportation, including commercial aviation. Although concerted efforts have been made to introduce initiatives encouraging women into senior leadership roles, change is slow and women remain underrepresented on Senior Management Teams (SMTs) and the Executive Committees of commercial airlines and airports. Globally, and prior to the COVID pandemic, only 3 per cent of airline CEOs were women whilst women held 8 per cent of airline CFO posts and 3 per cent of COO posts (Silk, 2019).

Air transport’s apparent inability to recruit and retain women in top leadership positions poses a serious challenge to the sector and the global economy as a whole. This chapter argues that lack of gender diversity will inevitably hinder the expansion of the sector and pose a significant challenge by failing to capitalise on the skill set of women. The aim of this chapter is to examine women’s representation and progression within the UK aviation sector with a particular focus on airports.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Abstract

Details

Women, Work and Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-670-4

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Tessa Wright, Lucy Budd and Stephen Ison

This chapter introduces the scope and contents of Women, Work and Transport. The situation concerning the extent of women’s participation in the transport workforce worldwide is

Abstract

This chapter introduces the scope and contents of Women, Work and Transport. The situation concerning the extent of women’s participation in the transport workforce worldwide is detailed and the challenges facing women transport workers in different world regions and transport modes is highlighted. The chapter describes the structure, contents and key contributions of each of the 21 chapters that are presented in this volume and signposts readers to key material. Although the chapter necessarily highlights some of the many challenges women face when working in highly masculine cultures, this wide-ranging international collection of evidence of the experiences of women transport professionals in both the Global North and Global South also provides numerous suggestions for how employers, governments and trade unions can address, and ultimately overcome, gender segregation in transport. The chapters acknowledge the dramatic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the transport sector, while also pointing to some of the opportunities provided by new greener forms of transport and automation, as well as noting the risks for women workers.

Details

Women, Work and Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-670-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

George Lodorfos, Anastasia Konstadopoulou, Ioannis Kostopoulos, Ioannis Rizomyliotis and Junjie Wu

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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