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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Randy K. Chiu and Allen Stembridge

Recent research has identified the major activities and factors that contribute to the success of managerial performance and growth. However, because of cultural differences, it…

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Abstract

Recent research has identified the major activities and factors that contribute to the success of managerial performance and growth. However, because of cultural differences, it is unwise to generalize such findings to the managerial population in Chinese societies. No comparable study of this sort has been carried out in the PRC. This research study seeks to find out what managerial success factors, as perceived by male managers in two regions in the PRC are the most influential in their rise to senior management positions. The study also compares factors perceived to be important in developing managers in Hong Kong and Guangdong.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Randy Chiu

The number of distance learning MBA programmes in Hong Kong has dramatically increased in the past decade. The Hong Kong government has to exercise regulatory measures to control…

1035

Abstract

The number of distance learning MBA programmes in Hong Kong has dramatically increased in the past decade. The Hong Kong government has to exercise regulatory measures to control the quality of these programmes. This study explores why Hong Kong managers decide to pursue a distance learning MBA degree and the criteria they use in selecting a desirable programme. An MBA degree was pursued mainly because of the urge of retaining an edge in the competitive job market, improving prospects for further career development, and for self achievement. Hierarchical regression analysis results indicated that career development related to all programme selection criteria whereas respondents who were motivated by self achievement emphasized practical issues such as cost, duration, and the structure of the programme itself.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1957

John F. Tormey

APPLICATION of the so‐called high energy liquid fuels and high energy liquid oxidizers to power plants based on the jet propulsion principle is receiving the increasing interest…

Abstract

APPLICATION of the so‐called high energy liquid fuels and high energy liquid oxidizers to power plants based on the jet propulsion principle is receiving the increasing interest and attention of rocket propellant chemists and power plant engineers universally. The aspect of substantially increased—as much as 50 per cent— energy per pound of propellant load or per cubic foot of propellant tankage over today's propellants has whetted scientific appetites and justified probing the field of high energy chemicals to determine, as logically and as practically as we can at the present time, the gains, problems, limitations and applications of these higher energy chemicals. The object of this paper is, in a general way, to discuss the subject of chemical rocket propellants in such a way that the following five questions will be, in part at least, answered or recalled to the minds of this audience for additional deliberation.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1928

It is not long since, in Scotland at least, the greater part of the food eaten was simple and unsophisticated. Oatmeal porridge and milk, bread, a very few varieties of…

Abstract

It is not long since, in Scotland at least, the greater part of the food eaten was simple and unsophisticated. Oatmeal porridge and milk, bread, a very few varieties of breadstuffs (such as oatcake and scones), fish, home‐killed meat, with rough dainties in the shape of black and white puddings, were the common food of most people. Thousands of forms in which food is presented to‐day, from homogenised milk to meat extract, did not exist. Along with a multitude of developments in the form in which food was presented to the public came a great number of manipulations. Some of these, like the cooling of milk after production, were laudable; some, like the freezing of meat for importation, were inevitable; and many others, such as preservation with chemicals, were of doubtful necessity, and in any case required careful watching. In the first half of the nineteenth century, and before it, adulterations of food were gross and dangerous. It is doubtful, however, whether the danger to health involved in specific infections of food was realised till much later. It is on the lines of minimising or preventing these two dangers that the administration has developed. One series of miscellaneous enactments deals with the prevention of infection or contamination, and another, the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts, 1875 to 1907, is concerned with “the nature, substance and quality” of articles of food and drink sold. Meat and milk, because of their nature and because of the inevitable risks involved in preparation and handling, are specially liable to infection and contamination. The uniform system and standard of meat inspection established in 1923 by the Public Health (Meat) Regulations (Scotland) have functioned well throughout the country. It was comparatively easy to secure the examination of every carcase, and to take all other necessary precautions, in the public slaughterhouses, but the five hundred private slaughterhouses throughout the country presented difficulties. The Regulations, however, by providing for the restriction of hours of slaughter, brought the majority of private slaughterhouses in populous places into line, and the remainder, principally in outlying districts, are visited by officers of the local authorities from time to time. Food inspectors are in constant attendance at the ports, and the import of certain classes of meat and fat is controlled by the Public Health (Oversea Meat) Regulations, 1925. In regard to milk, the Milk and Dairies (Scotland) Act, 1914, a consolidating statute which came into operation on 1st September, 1925, is the principal enactment. The Milk and Dairies (Amendment) Act, 1922, authorised the system of higher‐grade milk referred to below. In regard to other foods, the Public Health (Regulations as to Food) Act, 1907, authorises the framing of Regulations for preventing danger to public health from the importation, preparation, storage or distribution of articles of food or drink. The Unsound Food Regulations, 1925, provide for the inspection of all imported foods, and Section 43 of the Public Health (Scotland) Act, 1897, authorises inspection of animals, alive or dead, and articles of food exposed for sale, and the condemnation of any of these if found unfit for the food of man.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Roberto Luna‐Arocas and Toto Sutarso

This study examined a mediating model of income and pay satisfaction with a direct path (income → pay satisfaction) and an indirect path with two mediators (income → the love of…

Abstract

This study examined a mediating model of income and pay satisfaction with a direct path (income → pay satisfaction) and an indirect path with two mediators (income → the love of money → pay equity comparison → pay satisfaction). Results of the whole sample showed that the indirect path was significant and the direct path was insignificant. When the indirect path was eliminated, income contributed positively to pay satisfaction. We then tested the model across two moderators: culture (the United States versus Spain) and gender. This study provides the following theoretical and empirical contributions: the direct relationship between income and pay satisfaction depends on the indirect path and the extent to which (1) income enhances the love of money and (2) the love of money is applied to evaluate pay equity comparison satisfaction. If both conditions exist, income leads to pay dissatisfaction. If the second condition does not exist, income does not lead to pay dissatisfaction. Pay satisfaction depends on (1) one’s love of money and (2) how one compares. The role of the love of money in pay satisfaction is “not”universal across cultures and gender.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Samra Chaudary, Sohail Zafar and Thomas Li-Ping Tang

Following behavioral finance and monetary wisdom, the authors theorize: Decision-makers (investors) adopt deep-rooted personal values (the love-of-money attitudes/avaricious…

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Abstract

Purpose

Following behavioral finance and monetary wisdom, the authors theorize: Decision-makers (investors) adopt deep-rooted personal values (the love-of-money attitudes/avaricious financial aspirations) as a lens to frame critical concerns (short-term and long-term investment decisions) in the immediate-proximal (current income) and distal-omnibus (future inheritance) contexts to maximize expected utility and ultimate serenity across context, people and time.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 277 active equity traders (professional money managers and individual investors) in Pakistan’s two most robust investment hubs—Karachi and Lahore. The authors measured their love-of-money attitude (avaricious monetary aspirations), short-term and long-term investment decisions and demographic variables and collected data during Pakistan's bear markets (Pakistan Stock Exchange, PSX-100).

Findings

Investors’ love of money relates to short-term and long-term decisions. However, these relationships are significant for money managers but non-significant for individual investors. Further, investors’ current income moderates this relationship for short-term investment decisions but not long-term decisions. The intensity of the aspirations-to-short-term investment relationship is much higher for investors with low-income levels than those with average and high-income levels. Future inheritance moderates the relationships between aspirations and short-term and long-term decisions. Regardless of their love-of-money orientations, investors with future inheritance have higher magnitudes of short-term and long-term investments than those without future inheritance. The intensity of the aspirations-to-investments relationship is more potent for investors without future inheritance than those with inheritance. Investors with low avaricious monetary aspirations and without inheritance expectations show the lowest short-term and long-term investment decisions. Investors' current income and future inheritance moderate the relationships between their love of money attitude and short-term and long-term decisions differently in Pakistan's bear markets.

Practical implications

The authors help investors make financial decisions and help financial institutions, asset management companies, brokerage houses and investment banks identify marketing strategies and investor segmentation and provide individualized services.

Originality/value

Professional money managers have a stronger short-term orientation than individual investors. Lack of wealth (current income and future inheritance) motivates greedy investors to take more risks and become more vulnerable than non-greedy ones—investors’ financial resources and wealth matter. The Matthew Effect in investment decisions exists in Pakistan’s emerging economy.

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Clark Shi-Ming Tang, Thomas Li-Ping Tang and Xiao-Yan Li

This study aims to develop a Chinese core self-evaluations scale (CCSES) (Study 1) and examines the relationship between CCSES and self-reported job performance among…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a Chinese core self-evaluations scale (CCSES) (Study 1) and examines the relationship between CCSES and self-reported job performance among entrepreneurs in private small and medium enterprises in People's Republic of China (Study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the paper incorporated two indigenous Chinese constructs, team-based self-esteem and personal integrity, into the existing literature of CSE and developed a new CCSES using a sample of 300 Chinese entrepreneurs in Hangzhou, China. In Study 2, the paper validated the CCSES in a separate sample of 306 entrepreneurs and investigated the relationships between CCSES and self-reported job performance.

Findings

The paper identified four sub-constructs in the 13-item CCSES: personal self-esteem, team-based self-esteem, personal integrity, and self-competence. Results from exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed good psychometric properties and high reliability in Study 1. In Study 2, the paper found a good fit between the measurement model and the data, and a significant relationship between CCSES and the overall measure of job performance and its three components. Males had significantly higher Chinese core self-evaluations (CCSE) scores than females. There were no differences in CCSE scores across age and educational background.

Originality/value

Borrowing the CSE construct in the Western literature, the paper includes two indigenous Chinese constructs, team-based self-esteem and personal integrity, provides a new perspective of the CSE construct for entrepreneurs, and investigates its relationship with job performance in China.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 April 2012

Thomas Tang

The main purpose of this editorial is to combine the philosophies of learning from the Eastern and the Western cultures, offer some inspiration to researchers, and promote unique…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this editorial is to combine the philosophies of learning from the Eastern and the Western cultures, offer some inspiration to researchers, and promote unique and interesting contributions to the literature in Chinese human research management (HRM) research.

Design/methodology/approach

To illustrate the Eastern ways of thinking, the author selects two interesting Chinese words, uses reverse‐engineering, and demonstrates how our ancestors used rich, deep, and powerful meanings to design these Chinese words (Graphic 1) and also explores the meaning of knowledge or wisdom. They also reflect the Western culture and recent management literature.

Findings

The paper shows how researchers need to follow philosophical thoughts of the East and the West; study and evaluate the rich literature carefully; think deeply in order to challenge general assumptions and ask novel, original, and meaningful research questions; provide practical new knowledge; and make a significant contribution to the literature.

Originality/value

The paper promotes unique and interesting contributions to the literature in Chinese HRM research.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Hakan Erkutlu and Jamel Chafra

This study aims to build a moderated mediation model to investigate the roles that trust in the leader and follower Machiavellianism can play in the relationship between moral…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to build a moderated mediation model to investigate the roles that trust in the leader and follower Machiavellianism can play in the relationship between moral disengagement of the leader and hiding of knowledge of the followers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from eight universities in Turkey using a set of 72 matched leader (dean)–follower (faculty member) questionnaires. The hypotheses were tested with multiple regression, moderated regression and bootstrapping analyses.

Findings

The findings reveal that leader moral disengagement positively influences follower knowledge hiding, while trust in the leader mediates this influence and follower Machiavellianism not only moderates the relationship between leader moral disengagement and trust in the leader but also reduces the indirect relationship between leader moral disengagement and follower knowledge hiding through trust in the leader.

Research limitations/implications

Even though measurements of research variables were collected from different sources and with time separation, common method bias might have existed. Also, this research is carried out in a single cultural context posing the issue of the generalizability of our findings to other cultural contexts.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is to construct and investigate a conceptual model that focuses on the possible effect of moral disengagement of the leader on knowledge hiding by the followers. Also, by supporting the mediating role of trust in the leader, this research reveals that followers of leaders with high moral disengagement are more prone to indulge in the hiding of knowledge. Moreover, the moderating role of follower Machiavellianism, found in this study, provides an additional understanding that followers may vary in the degree to which they are sensitive to the leader's influence.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Theresa Li‐Na Tang and Beeta Yazmeen Homaifar

This study aims to test a model of pay satisfaction and argue that the income‐pay satisfaction relationship depends on one's love of money and how one compares.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a model of pay satisfaction and argue that the income‐pay satisfaction relationship depends on one's love of money and how one compares.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates: a direct path (income → total pay satisfaction); an indirect path (income → the love of money → pay equity comparison → total pay satisfaction) using a structural equation model (SEM) based on 210 full‐time employees; and the model across race and gender in multi‐group analyses.

Findings

The paper finds that for the whole sample, there was one significant path (pay equity comparison → total pay satisfaction). Since African‐Americans ($32,073.15) and women ($32,400.58) tended to have lower income than Caucasians ($37,180.73) and men ($38,287.97), respectively, income significantly increased the importance of the love of money for African‐Americans and females, but not for Caucasians and males. The love of money to pay equity comparison path was not significant. Income was not related to pay satisfaction. Results of the direct path alone showed that income contributes to pay satisfaction for the whole sample, male and female employees, and Caucasians, but not for African‐Americans.

Research implications/limitations

If people do not use the love of money to judge pay equity comparison, their income does not lead to low pay satisfaction. The sub‐samples are small.

Originality/value

This paper shows the importance of including the love of money in understanding pay satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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