Search results

1 – 10 of 41
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

George Benson, Nicola Roberts, Jacqueline McCallum and Andrew McPherson

The purpose of this paper is to identify published literature from a general hospital setting that may highlight variables implicated in the development of severe alcohol…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify published literature from a general hospital setting that may highlight variables implicated in the development of severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome (SAWS) in patients who have alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS).

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was carried out using the electronic databases: MEDLINE, Medline in Process, Cinahl, Embase and PsycINFO from 1989 to 2017. The focus of this search was on English language studies of individuals over 16 years admitted to general hospital with ADS, delirium tremens (DTs), alcohol-related seizure (ARS) or alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS).

Findings

Of the 205 studies screened, eight met the criteria for inclusion. Six studies were quantitative retrospective cohort and two were retrospective case-control. Six studies investigated risk factors associated with DTs, one examined SAWS and one alcohol kindling. Descriptive analysis was performed to summarise the empirical evidence from studies were 22 statistically significant risk factors were found; including the reason for admission to hospital, daily alcohol consumption, previous DTs and prior ARS. The last two factors mentioned appeared in two studies.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should consider the quality and completeness of the alcohol history data and competence of staff generating the data in retrospective studies.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that the factors linked to SAWS development from the literature may not fully explain why some individuals who have ADS develop SAWS, and others do not.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2010

Rebecca Dawber

Alcohol‐related brain damage (ARBD) is an increasing challenge for service providers working with older people and adults. It has a complex aetiology and does not progress…

Abstract

Alcohol‐related brain damage (ARBD) is an increasing challenge for service providers working with older people and adults. It has a complex aetiology and does not progress in the same way as other causes of dementia. The devastating effects of ARBD undermine a person's ability to lead an independent life, yet it is thought that with the right interventions, a degree of recovery can be seen in 75% of sufferers. People with ARBD do not neatly fit into an existing category of care; they ‘fall through the net’ at multiple points in the care pathway. Using a patient synopsis drawn from clinical practice the author illustrates the impact of an advanced practice role in relation to the nursing care of patients with ARBD, as well as making suggestions for the provision of education and support for mainstream services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

George Benson, Andrew McPherson, Jacqueline McCallum and Nicola Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to develop an alcohol withdrawal syndrome risk stratification tool that could support the safe discharge of low risk patients from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an alcohol withdrawal syndrome risk stratification tool that could support the safe discharge of low risk patients from the emergency department.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective cohort study that included all patients referred to the acute addiction liaison nursing service over one calendar month (n=400, 1–30 April 2016) was undertaken. Bivariate and multivariate modelling identified the significant variables that supported the prediction of severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome (SAWS) in the cohort population.

Findings

The Glasgow Modified Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (GMAWS), hours since last drink, fast alcohol screening test (FAST) and systolic blood pressure correctly identified 89 per cent of patients who developed SAWS and 84 per cent of patients that did not. Increasing each component by a score of one is associated with an increase in the odds of SAWS by a factor of 2.76 (95% CI 2.21, 3.45), 1.31 (95% CI 1.24, 1.37), 1.30 (95% CI 1.08, 1.57) and 1.22 (95% CI 1.10, 1.34), respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted in a single healthcare system that had a high prevalence of alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS). Second, the developed risk stratification tool was unable to guarantee no risk and lastly, the FAST score previously aligned to severe ADS may have influenced the patients highest GMAWS score.

Practical implications

The tool could help redesign the care pathway for patients who attend the emergency department at risk of SAWS and link low risk patients with community alcohol services better equipped to deal with their physical and psychological needs short and long term supporting engagement, abstinence and prolongation of life.

Originality/value

The tool could help redesign the care pathway for emergency department patients at low risk of SAWS and link them with community alcohol services better equipped to deal with their physical and psychological needs, short and long term, supporting engagement, abstinence and prolongation of life.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Liz Hughes

Abstract

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 February 2011

Maureen Rakshi, Ian Wilson, Simon Burrow and Mark Holland

There is growing statistical and research evidence to suggest that the prevalence of alcohol misuse is increasing among older adults in the UK. This has been an…

Downloads
422

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing statistical and research evidence to suggest that the prevalence of alcohol misuse is increasing among older adults in the UK. This has been an under‐recognised problem, but is now a source of increasing concern for health and social care providers. Older adults with mental health problems have increased vulnerability to problematic alcohol use, and this is likely to have a significant impact on older people's mental health services (OPMHS).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses some of the problems facing OPMHS in relation to increasing alcohol misuse among services users.

Findings

There is also evidence that alcohol misuse in older adults is often poorly identified and untreated within health and social care services including OPMHS. Use of an alcohol‐screening tool as part of a health care assessment is an effective way to improve detection. This paper also reviews the use of alcohol screening tools in the detection of alcohol related illness among older adults with mental health problems and proposes a care pathway for the management of alcohol misuse in OPMHS.

Originality/value

Current evidence indicates that the prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adults is increasing and is likely to rise further due to the reasons discussed in this paper.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Rahul Rao

The assessment of patterns in risky drinking and its association with dual diagnosis in community services for older people remains under-explored. The paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The assessment of patterns in risky drinking and its association with dual diagnosis in community services for older people remains under-explored. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Drinking risk using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the presence of co-existing mental disorders was examined in 190 people aged 65 and over.

Findings

In total, 24 per cent of drinkers drank above lower risk levels and 22 per cent reported binge drinking over the past 12 months. Those scoring 1 or more on the AUDIT were more likely to be male and to have greater cognitive impairment than non-drinkers and those reporting no past problems with alcohol.

Research limitations/implications

Given the limitations of the Mini Mental State Examination in the detection of alcohol related cognitive impairment (ARCI), the use of other cognitive screening instruments in larger study populations is also warranted.

Practical implications

Greater attention needs to be paid to the assessment of risky drinking in older male drinkers and those with cognitive impairment.

Originality/value

There is considerable scope for the routine detection of cognitive impairment and dementia in older people with alcohol use within mainstream mental health services, particularly in those with binge drinking. As ARCI is associated with loss of function and independence, early detection and intervention can improve health and social outcomes.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Louise Learmonth and Helene Leslie

In 1992, a Scottish Office grant was awarded to develop a nurse‐led alcohol liaison service for patients within a busy general hospital (Leslie & Learmonth, 1994).This…

Abstract

In 1992, a Scottish Office grant was awarded to develop a nurse‐led alcohol liaison service for patients within a busy general hospital (Leslie & Learmonth, 1994).This project was based on previous research conducted in the same hospital that concluded that early detection of alcohol problems and minimal intervention could considerably reduce long‐term alcohol‐related damage (Chick et al., 1985). A first article describing the service was published in 1994 (Leslie & Learmonth). This follow‐up article aims to describe how the service has developed and expanded since then. This includes the many issues we have encountered on our path to a greater understanding and delivery of specialist alcohol service.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Rebecca Schiff, Bernie Pauly, Shana Hall, Kate Vallance, Andrew Ivsins, Meaghan Brown, Erin Gray, Bonnie Krysowaty and Joshua Evans

Recently, Managed Alcohol Programs (MAPs have emerged as an alcohol harm reduction model for those living with severe alcohol use disorder (AUD) and experiencing…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, Managed Alcohol Programs (MAPs have emerged as an alcohol harm reduction model for those living with severe alcohol use disorder (AUD) and experiencing homelessness. There is still a lack of clarity about the role of these programs in relation to Housing First (HF) discourse. The authors examine the role of MAPs within a policy environment that has become dominated by a focus on HF approaches to addressing homelessness. This examination includes a focus on Canadian policy contexts where MAPs originated and are still predominately located. The purpose of this paper is to trace the development of MAPs as a novel response to homelessness among people experiencing severe AUD and to describe the place of MAPs within a HF context.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper outlines the development of discourses related to persons experiencing severe AUD and homelessness, with a focus on HF and MAPs as responses to these challenges. The authors compare the key characteristics of MAPs with “core principles” and values as outlined in various definitions of HF.

Findings

MAPs incorporate many of the core values or principles of HF as outlined in some definitions, although not all. MAPs (and other housing/treatment models) provide critical housing and support services for populations who might not fit well with or who might not prefer HF models.

Originality/value

The “silver bullet” discourse surrounding HF (and harm reduction) can obscure the importance of programs (such as MAPs) that do not fully align with all HF principles and program models. This is despite the fact that MAPs (and other models) provide critical housing and support services for populations who might fall between the cracks of HF models. There is the potential for MAPs to help fill a gap in the application of harm reduction in HF programs. The authors also suggest a need to move beyond HF discourse, to embrace complexity and move toward examining what mixture of different housing and harm reduction supports are needed to provide a complete or comprehensive array of services and supports for people who use substances and are experiencing homelessness.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Christine Goodair

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

1 – 10 of 41