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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Lori Anderson Snyder, Peter Y. Chen, Paula L. Grubb, Rashaun K. Roberts, Steven L. Sauter and Naomi G. Swanson

This chapter examines aggression at work perpetrated by individual insiders by bringing together streams of research that have often been examined separately. A comparison…

Abstract

This chapter examines aggression at work perpetrated by individual insiders by bringing together streams of research that have often been examined separately. A comparison of the similarities and differences of aggression toward individuals, such as verbal abuse or physical attack, and aggression toward organizations, such as embezzlement or work slowdowns, is shown to provide important insights about the causes and consequences of workplace aggression. We propose a comprehensive model based on the integration of prior theoretical treatments and empirical findings. The model attempts to offer a framework to systematically examine psychological and organizational mechanisms underlying workplace aggression, and to explain the reasons why workplace violence policies and procedures sometimes fail. A set of research propositions is also suggested to assist in achieving this end in future research.

Details

Exploring Interpersonal Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-153-8

Abstract

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

Abstract

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Joanne Steward and Franco Follina

This review collates the empirical evidence on the behavioural effects of media violence. It assesses the content of different forms of media to which patients in secure…

Abstract

This review collates the empirical evidence on the behavioural effects of media violence. It assesses the content of different forms of media to which patients in secure services could be exposed. Numerous explanations for behaving aggressively are examined, using a variety of theoretical backgrounds. The effect of viewing different forms of violence on individuals' behaviour is also examined. The review includes positive influences of exposure to media violence, though the main findings are that exposure to aggressive and violent material increases aggressive thoughts, feelings and behaviour. The review presents research on violence depicted in films, video games, comic books and song lyrics, and assesses its impact on aggressive and inappropriate behaviour; it also addresses exposure to weapons. We conclude by outlining how this research could influence policy on the resources made available to forensic populations, advocating assessment of the suitability of presenting a particular piece of media violence to the individual rather than a whole population, and the possibility that individual responses to media violence can be a useful assessment tool.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Leïla Oubrahim, Nicolas Combalbert and Véronique Salvano-Pardieu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of aggressive behaviour among children and adolescents with intellectual disability (ID) and to demonstrate a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of aggressive behaviour among children and adolescents with intellectual disability (ID) and to demonstrate a possible link with moral judgement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was carried out using two scales on a sample of 60 young people with ID in specialized schools. The first scale was “Behavior Problems Inventory-Short Form” (Rojahn et al., 2012) used to assess the frequency of aggressive behaviour and the second involved several scenarios about social situations of aggressiveness to assess moral judgement.

Findings

The main findings indicate that children and adolescents with ID gave more importance to the factor “consequences” than to that of “intent”. Moreover, there was a link between moral judgement and aggressive behaviour. Indeed, aggressive people found it harder to take into account the other’s point of view. Regarding moral judgement, they gave greater importance to the “consequences” factor than non-aggressive people.

Originality/value

The study aimed to establish, for the first time, a link between aggressiveness and moral judgement (blame) in ID (Anderson, 1996). This study clearly provides useful information regarding public health for patients, professionals and families. The authors were able to measure a similar frequency of aggressive behaviour in both children and adolescents with ID. The authors also highlighted a link between these aggressive behaviours and moral judgement. This knowledge should enhance understanding of manifestations of aggressiveness in this population, and improve diagnostic assessment. It should also help define appropriate directions for educational interventions to prevent the onset of aggressive behaviour or delinquency.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2009

Katie Turner and David Clarke

Aggressive behaviour is a problem for services providing care for people with intellectual disabilities, affecting the quality of life of the individual and the quality of…

Abstract

Aggressive behaviour is a problem for services providing care for people with intellectual disabilities, affecting the quality of life of the individual and the quality of care provided. Current research trends, which focus on risk factors and mental health problems, are discussed. Other factors that could contribute to aggression in people with intellectual disability (PWID), such as lifestyle and environmental issues are examined. A methodology that would allow for the integration of all these factors, Behavioural Sequence Analysis, is a suitable investigative approach to this problem.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Sarah M. Coyne, Laura Stockdale and David A. Nelson

This review aims to examine how aggression is portrayed in the media and how it can influence behavior and attitudes regarding aggression.

Abstract

Purpose

This review aims to examine how aggression is portrayed in the media and how it can influence behavior and attitudes regarding aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the relevant literature and examined both physical and relational forms of aggression in multiple media forms (television, film, video games, music, books).

Findings

Across media types, evidence is found that both physical and relational aggression are portrayed frequently and in ways that may contribute to subsequent aggression. Furthermore, though there are studies finding no effect of exposure to media aggression, evidence is found that watching physical and relational aggression in the media can contribute to aggressive behavior. Prominent media aggression theories are reviewed and some of these theories are applied to relational aggression media effects.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers should no longer ignore relational aggression in terms of the media, in terms of content and associations with aggressive behavior. Researchers should also focus on understudied media forms, such as music and books.

Practical implications

Policy makers should take careful note of the research on media and aggression when deciding on public policy and clinicians should inquire about media habits when clients show problematic aggressive behavior (physical or relational).

Originality/value

This paper is a valuable source of information regarding current research on media and aggression. Unlike other reviews, it focuses on multiple types of aggression (physical and relational) and multiple media types (TV, movies, video games, music, and books).

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Bradley John Olson, Debra L. Nelson and Satyanarayana Parayitam

The paper aims to incorporate a sensemaking framework that augments research on organizational justice and aggression.

3991

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to incorporate a sensemaking framework that augments research on organizational justice and aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

Sensemaking is used as a basis for designing an aggression model. Organizational justice and attribution theory are key components of sensemaking triggers. In addition, the model includes both organizational and personal influences on the sensemaking process. Finally, information processing theory provides explanations as to the importance of retrospect in sensemaking.

Findings

The sensemaking framework: presents the workplace antecedents of the sensemaking process; specifies the sensemaking triggers that provoke aggressive responses; identifies the individual and organizational factors that affect both the sensemaking triggers and the link between triggers and aggressive behaviors; and incorporates a full range of aggressive behaviors (e.g. violence, verbal abuse, or refusal to return telephone calls) that occur in organizations.

Practical implications

The paper proposes that by taking a sensemaking perspective, leaders can understand and proactively manage aggressive behavior in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive aggression model that can assist both researchers and practitioners regarding the sensemaking process and its role in workplace aggression.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2022

Angela F. Randolph, Danna Greenberg, Jessica K. Simon and William B. Gartner

The authors explore the relationship between adolescent behavior and subsequent entrepreneurial persistence by drawing on scholarship from clinical psychology and…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore the relationship between adolescent behavior and subsequent entrepreneurial persistence by drawing on scholarship from clinical psychology and criminology to examine different subtypes of antisocial behavior (nonaggressive antisocial behavior and aggressive antisocial behavior) that underlie adolescent rule breaking. The intersection of gender and socioeconomic status on these types of antisocial behavior and entrepreneurial persistence is also studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a longitudinal research design, this study draws from a national representative survey of USA adolescents, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997) (NLSY97). Nonaggressive antisocial behavior was assessed with a composite scale that measured economic self-interest and with a second measure that focused on substance abuse. Aggressive antisocial behavior was assessed as a measure of aggressive, destructive behaviors, such as fighting and property destruction. Entrepreneurial persistence was operationalized as years of self-employment experience, which is based on the number of years a respondent reported any self-employment.

Findings

Aggressive antisocial behavior is positively related to entrepreneurial persistence but nonaggressive antisocial behavior is not. This relationship is moderated by gender and socioeconomic status.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to research on the relationship between adolescent behavior and entrepreneurship in adulthood, the effect of antisocial behavior, and demographic intersectionality (by gender and socioeconomic status) in entrepreneurship. The authors surmise that the finding that self-employment for men from lower socioeconomic backgrounds involved in aggressive antisocial behavior was significantly higher compared to others may indicate that necessity entrepreneurship may be the primary driver of entrepreneurial activity for these individuals.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Theresa M. Glomb

Although researchers have suggested that aggression is multiply determined, most studies examine only a small set of predictors, focusing on either situational or…

Abstract

Although researchers have suggested that aggression is multiply determined, most studies examine only a small set of predictors, focusing on either situational or individual or reciprocal motives. Research has not studied extensively the relative strength of multiple antecedent sets. Using questionnaire data (n = 366), the current study examines eleven antecedents of employees engaging in aggression: situational antecedents (i.e., procedural, distributive, and interpersonal justice; organizational, work group, and job related stress), individual difference antecedents (i.e., Type A behavior, trait anger, reactions to anger), and reciprocal effects (i.e., being the target of aggression). Individual difference antecedents and being the target of aggression influence the frequency with which employees report engaging in aggression. Situational antecedents are not significant predictors once other antecedents are taken into account.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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