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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Sarah M. Coyne, Laura Stockdale and David A. Nelson

This review aims to examine how aggression is portrayed in the media and how it can influence behavior and attitudes regarding aggression.

Abstract

Purpose

This review aims to examine how aggression is portrayed in the media and how it can influence behavior and attitudes regarding aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the relevant literature and examined both physical and relational forms of aggression in multiple media forms (television, film, video games, music, books).

Findings

Across media types, evidence is found that both physical and relational aggression are portrayed frequently and in ways that may contribute to subsequent aggression. Furthermore, though there are studies finding no effect of exposure to media aggression, evidence is found that watching physical and relational aggression in the media can contribute to aggressive behavior. Prominent media aggression theories are reviewed and some of these theories are applied to relational aggression media effects.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers should no longer ignore relational aggression in terms of the media, in terms of content and associations with aggressive behavior. Researchers should also focus on understudied media forms, such as music and books.

Practical implications

Policy makers should take careful note of the research on media and aggression when deciding on public policy and clinicians should inquire about media habits when clients show problematic aggressive behavior (physical or relational).

Originality/value

This paper is a valuable source of information regarding current research on media and aggression. Unlike other reviews, it focuses on multiple types of aggression (physical and relational) and multiple media types (TV, movies, video games, music, and books).

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Chunyong Yuan, Aihui Shao, Xinyin Chen, Tao Xin, Li Wang and Yufang Bian

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the developmental trajectory and patterns of physical aggression and relational aggression over time, and also to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the developmental trajectory and patterns of physical aggression and relational aggression over time, and also to examine the gender differences of the three-year developmental process as well as the impact of the developmental trajectory on mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants: the participants of this study were newly enrolled junior school students. The study spanned three years with continuous tracking performed once every other year. Measures: class play questionnaire. Aggressive behaviors were measured by an adaptive Chinese version of the revised class play assessment. Statistical analysis: to address the questions of the present study, the latent class growth model (LCGM) was used to analyze the three-year longitudinal data by Mplus 6.1.

Findings

The initial level of physical aggression in boys was higher than that in girls. There were three types of developmental trajectory for boys, corresponding to a lower initial level-increasing group, a middle initial level-increasing group and a higher initial level-stable group. However, girls demonstrated different patterns, corresponding to a lower initial level-increasing group, a middle initial level-increasing group and a higher initial level-decreasing group. In contrast to the physical aggression, the initial level of relational aggression in boys was lower than that in girls. There were four types of developmental trajectory for boys, corresponding to a lower initial level-increasing group, a middle initial level-increasing group, a middle initial level-declining group and a higher initial level-declining group. Girls illustrated different patterns, corresponding to a lower initial level-stable group, a middle initial level-increasing group and a higher initial level-declining group. Different developmental trajectory of physical and relational aggression would influence the interpersonal relationship.

Originality/value

This paper used a person-centered latent variable approach instead of the variable-centered approach to investigate the developmental trajectory and patterns of physical aggression and relational aggression over three year by employing the LCGM. The initial level of physical aggression in boys was higher than that in girls. In contrast, the initial level of relational aggression in boys was lower than that in girls. There were gender differences in the pattern of physical and relational aggression development trajectory. Different developmental trajectory of physical and relational aggression would influence the interpersonal relationship.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Stacey Kent, Ashlea C. Troth and Peter J. Jordan

Aggression in the workplace has increasingly become a focus of organizational behavior research given its debilitating effects on employees and consistent links to reduced…

Abstract

Aggression in the workplace has increasingly become a focus of organizational behavior research given its debilitating effects on employees and consistent links to reduced organizational performance. The current literature on workplace aggression presents a bewildering array of definitions with overlapping meanings creating confusion for researchers and academics. In response to this, we consider a range of definitions of workplace aggression and build a taxonomy of workplace aggressive behaviors based on four dimensions: intensity, impact, intentionality, and indirect/direct aggression. This chapter contributes to the field offering a taxonomy of aggressive behaviors at work that can be used in subsequent research.

Details

Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 September 2020

Leïla Oubrahim and Nicolas Combalbert

To fill this gap, this paper aims to translate the children’s scale of hostility and aggression: reactive/proactive (C-SHARP) into French and then tested its psychometric…

Abstract

Purpose

To fill this gap, this paper aims to translate the children’s scale of hostility and aggression: reactive/proactive (C-SHARP) into French and then tested its psychometric properties and established the first French standards.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper assess the aggressive behavior of 305 children and adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). This paper tested the scale’s factor structure (confirmatory factor analysis), internal consistency and inter-rater reliability.

Findings

The results support a factor structure similar to the US version. Factor analysis yielded a five-factor solution, namely, verbal aggression (12 items), bullying (12 items), covert aggression (11 items), hostility (9 items) and physical aggression (8 items). The French-speaking version of the C-SHARP shows good reliability (internal consistency) and good inter-rater reliability. The French version demonstrated encouraging evidence of validity. This paper also established French norms that were similar to US norms. This paper concludes that the French-speaking version of the C-SHARP must benefit from additional psychometric analyzes to confirm its adaptation for research and the clinic.

Originality/value

There is no tool currently available in France for the evaluation of aggressive behavior in children and adolescents with ID. The C-SHARP (Farmer and Aman, 2009) is the only questionnaire that specifically assesses aggression in children and adolescents with ID, its form, frequency and its proactive or reactive qualities. The French version of the C-SHARP could be a useful diagnostic tool to assess aggressive behavior in children and adolescents with ID and to identify and set up appropriate support strategies.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2010

Claire Monks and Peter Smith

The aim of the current study was to develop and assess a method for obtaining peer‐, selfand teacher‐nominations of the participant roles in peer victimisation appropriate…

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to develop and assess a method for obtaining peer‐, selfand teacher‐nominations of the participant roles in peer victimisation appropriate for use with children between the ages of five and eight years. Sixty‐eight five‐year‐olds and 69 eight‐year‐olds and their teachers took part. Peer‐nominations (including self‐nominations) were obtained from five‐ and eight‐year‐olds for participant roles of aggressor, reinforcer, assistant, defender, outsider, passive and provocative victim; and similar nominations from their teachers. At both ages, children were able to nominate for all the roles, and consistent gender differences were found. Test‐retest reliability (over an interval of one week) was moderate to high for all roles in eight‐year‐olds, but only for aggressor and provocative victim in five‐year‐olds. There was evidence for role discrimination, but five‐year‐olds gave similar nominations for aggressor and provocative victim. Within‐class pupil agreement was significant for aggressor and provocative victim at both ages, and for passive victim and defender at eight years. Peer‐ and teacher‐ratings showed better agreement with each other than with self‐nominations. The findings are discussed in relation to children's developing abilities to identify and report various roles, as well as developmental changes in the nature of peer‐aggression.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Laura Stockdale, Sarah Tackett and Sarah M. Coyne

The current study aimed to investigate potential sex differences in the use of verbal aggression in romantic relationships.

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aimed to investigate potential sex differences in the use of verbal aggression in romantic relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study used meta‐analytic methodology to analyze 20 studies to understand gender differences in the use of verbal aggression in romantic relationships.

Findings

The results found that women used more verbal aggression than men in romantic relationships; however, overall levels of verbal aggression use were relatively high regardless of sex.

Research imitations/implications

Limitations of the current research, such as calling for less exploratory research and the need for theories grounded in human coupling research, and suggestions for future research are provided.

Practical implications

Advice for clinicians and practitioners regarding verbal aggression in romantic relationships is discussed with particular emphasis on the possibility of including measures against verbal aggression in interventions on positive couple communication.

Originality/value

The current study adds to the literature by addressing which sex uses more verbal aggression in romantic relationships and providing a critical review of the existing literature with recommendations and limitations of the field.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2010

Marina Butovskaya, Valentina Burkova and Audax Mabulla

This study was conducted on children and adolescents from the three tribal cultures from Northern Tanzania: the Hadza, the Datoga and the Iraqw. The comparative data on…

Abstract

This study was conducted on children and adolescents from the three tribal cultures from Northern Tanzania: the Hadza, the Datoga and the Iraqw. The comparative data on aggression and conflict management skills were measured at Endomaga Boarding School, Lake Eyasi, Mangola in Northern Tanzania, in 2005‐2006. The final sample included 219 children, ranging from 7 to 20 years of age. No sex differences were found in self‐ratings or frequency of occurrence of physical, verbal and indirect aggression in Iraqw children and adolescents, or in self‐ratings in Hadza. Hadza boys reported a higher occurrence of physical and indirect aggression during the previous week compared to girls. No differences between the sexes were found in constructive conflict resolution and third‐party interventions practiced by Iraqw and Datoga children and self‐ratings in Hadza. Hadza boys reported a higher frequency of constructive conflict resolution and third‐party interventions compared to girls. Significant sexual dimorphism on the 2D:4D ratio was found for our African sample. A significant negative correlation between the right hand 2D:4D ratio and ratings on physical aggression was found for the girls. The girls with the lowest finger index estimated themselves as more verbally aggressive, compared to girls with a medium 2D:4D ratio.

Book part
Publication date: 2 June 2022

Antoinette Halsell Miranda, Halima Alhassan and Maureen J. Ito

Identity construction is a dynamic process that encompasses a variety of factors such as commonalities, loyalties, power struggles, and survival instincts (Lei, 2003). The…

Abstract

Identity construction is a dynamic process that encompasses a variety of factors such as commonalities, loyalties, power struggles, and survival instincts (Lei, 2003). The complex dimensions of Black identity are influenced, in part, by community, comfort, and acceptance which at times imposes fixed categorizations, characteristics, and singular depictions. Recent research suggests that more attention be paid to the needs of Black adolescent girls and how their race and gender impact what happens in schools (Koonce, 2012). Moreover, it challenges and influences academic success, as it is challenging and difficult to excel in environments that fail to value every aspect of one's identity or identities (Rollock, 2007).

Black girls' interaction with each other, especially in urban schools, can also be problematic and resemble “relational aggression,” when in fact it is a form of posturing to increase their social status. Contextual factors (e.g., culture, school climate) can serve as risk or protective factors for involvement in posturing, relationship aggression, or increasing one's social status. Research focused on peer relationships has found differences in friendship patterns among ethnically and socioeconomically diverse youth, suggesting the importance of examining friendships within the context of ethnic and socioeconomic diversity (see Brown, Way, & Duff, 1999; Crothers, Field, & Kolbert, 2005). Sisterhood among Black girls can serve as a supportive network that enhances the “Black girl experience” as well as promote wellness and healthy identity.

Details

African American Young Girls and Women in PreK12 Schools and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-532-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 April 2021

Maria Malayter

Impactful leadership requires an investment in the self and others. Blinded by past success, this leader’s story explains examples of a failed attempt to learn how to…

Abstract

Impactful leadership requires an investment in the self and others. Blinded by past success, this leader’s story explains examples of a failed attempt to learn how to navigate a new industry culture with hidden political landmines in the organization, communicate effectively in a hierarchy, and ultimately realize she might not have been a fit for the organization. This chapter will provide examples of the leader’s story of challenging organizational politics and relational aggression in the workplace. Through many conflicts and barriers to effective leadership, this chapter provides key insights of leadership self-awareness, wellness, communication blind spots, and organizational strategies to build trusting leader–follower relationships. Living in a volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA) world today, the ability to build strong trusting relationships between leaders and followers and peers is vital to success as a leader and organization. The leader must learn from failure and innovate from lessons learned. To lead within a VUCA world, the time to invest in continuous leadership development is strongly recommended.

Details

When Leadership Fails: Individual, Group and Organizational Lessons from the Worst Workplace Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-766-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Alexander Wettstein, Mara Brendgen, Frank Vitaro, Fanny‐Alexandra Guimond, Nadine Forget‐Dubois, Stéphane Cantin, Ginette Dionne and Michel Boivin

Distinguishing between physical and social aggression, this study aimed to examine whether the predictive effect of aggression on resource control is moderated by…

Abstract

Purpose

Distinguishing between physical and social aggression, this study aimed to examine whether the predictive effect of aggression on resource control is moderated by prosocial behavior and corresponds to a linear or a curvilinear trend. Moderating effects of children's social preference among peers and child sex in this context were also tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 682 kindergarten children (348 girls; average age 72.7 months, 3.6 SD), multilevel regressions revealed additive linear effects of social preference and prosociality on resource control.

Findings

Moderate (but not high) levels of social aggression also facilitated resource control for disliked children. There was no such threshold effect for well‐liked children, who increasingly controlled the resource the more socially aggressive they were. In contrast, physical aggression hampered resource control unless used very modestly.

Originality/value

The present study has a number of positive features. First, the distinction between physical and social aggression improves our understanding of the relation between aggression and social competence and sketches a more differentiated picture of the role of different forms of aggression in resource control. Second, this study combines the concept of resource control with the concept of social preference and investigates curvilinear effects of aggression. Third, the direct observation of resource control in the Movie Viewer increases the internal validity of this study.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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