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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 November 2022

Afrodite Malliari, Ilias Nitsos, Sofia Zapounidou and Stavros Doropoulos

This paper aims to attempt to provide an overview of the copyright legal framework for audiovisual resources in Europe and Greece, how Audiovisual (AV) content is currently…

1031

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to attempt to provide an overview of the copyright legal framework for audiovisual resources in Europe and Greece, how Audiovisual (AV) content is currently licensed by Greek providers and how licenses or copyright exceptions enable its reuse. The motivation for this work was the development of an aggregation service for audiovisual resources in Greece, the Open AudioVisual Archives (OAVA) platform.

Design/methodology/approach

Copyright licenses and exceptions in the European Union and in Greek Legislation have been thoroughly reviewed along with the reuse of content, based on the terms of Fair Use, Rights Statements and Creative Commons. Licensing issues for the most well-known aggregation services, such as Europeana, Digital Public Library of America, Trove, Digital New Zealand and the National Digital Library of India, have also been studied and considered. Audiovisual content providers in Greece have been recorded, and their licensing preferences have been analyzed. Pearson’s chi-square test was applied to test the relationship between the provider’s type, resources’ genre and licenses used.

Findings

Despite the abundance of copyright legislation in the European Union and in Greece, audiovisual content providers in Greece seem to ignore it or find it difficult to choose the right license. More than half of them choose to publish their resources on popular audiovisual platforms using the default licensing option provided. Creative Commons licenses are preferred for audiovisual content that falls into the following categories: open courses (almost exclusively) and interviews and digital collection/research projects (about half of the content).

Originality/value

This paper examines audiovisual content aggregation, in the EU and Greece, from a legal point of view. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, it is the first attempt to record and analyze the licensing preferences of Greek AV content providers.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Michalis Gerolimos, Afrodite Malliari and Pavlos Iakovidis

– The purpose of this paper is to create a profile of the modern American academic librarian through the content analysis method of job advertisements.

2014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a profile of the modern American academic librarian through the content analysis method of job advertisements.

Design/methodology/approach

One hundred thirty-four advertisements were analyzed in various ways, e.g. salary, skills, qualifications, duties, followed by a multivariate analysis.

Findings

Most significant findings include the importance of communication skills for all academic librarians, the significance of the Library and Information Science (LIS) degree and that applicants should expect a salary of $40,000-60,000.

Originality/value

This paper builds on the previous studies in the field to verify that communication skills are among the most, if not the most, desired skills for a modern librarian, and that an LIS degree is still an asset.

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Afrodite Malliari, Stella Korobili and Aspasia Togia

The purpose of the present study was to expand the knowledge of student computer competencies and IT self‐efficacy in two LIS departments in Greece.

1471

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study was to expand the knowledge of student computer competencies and IT self‐efficacy in two LIS departments in Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants in the study were students in the two LIS departments of the Technological Educational Institutes (TEI) situated in Thessaloniki and Athens, Greece. The survey was addressed to sophomores, juniors and seniors, because IT courses are taught after the first year of study. The instrument of the survey was a structured questionnaire comprising three parts, measuring a total of 48 variables.

Findings

The levels of students' IT self‐efficacy is rather high, while the mean score of computer competence indicates a rather low level of perceived ability in using computers. Students were more competent in using e‐mail and Facebook, as well as using the internet for personal purposes. IT self‐efficacy and perceived computer competence were positively related to the frequency of use of certain electronic activities and previous PC/internet experience. In addition, the frequency of IT use was a strong predictor of IT self‐efficacy, and both frequency of use and experience were predictors of computer competence. The findings also suggested that increased levels of self‐efficacy and computer competence were associated with higher grades.

Originality/value

By being aware of the factors that predict self‐efficacy and perceived ability, educators in both LIS departments can design instruction or other interventions in a way that will boost self‐efficacy beliefs. Such an approach is likely to increase the acceptance and use of IT and help LIS students meet the learning objectives of IT courses.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Aspasia Togia, Stella Korobili and Afrodite Malliari

The purpose of this paper is to give an insight to the motivation processes and learning strategies of the students of the Library and Information Systems (LIS) Department of…

3859

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an insight to the motivation processes and learning strategies of the students of the Library and Information Systems (LIS) Department of Alexander Technological Educational Institute (ATEI), Thessaloniki, in courses encompassing Information Technology (IT).

Design/methodology/approach

The students participated in the study between the 10th and 12th week of a 13‐week semester. Data were collected with the Science Motivation Questionnaire (SMQ) and the Self‐Regulated Learning Strategies component of the Motivational Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Independent samples t‐tests were used to indicate any associations between motivation to learn and learning strategies, with students' background characteristics. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict students' levels of motivation from the background characteristics, and their intention to continue their studies and to work as librarians/information professionals.

Findings

Results showed that participants reported relatively increased levels of motivation and employment of effective learning strategies. Participants' intention to continue their studies in library/information science emerged as the only variable that significantly contributed to the equation for predicting self‐regulated learning from the whole set of predictors and also to the prediction of motivation to learn.

Research limitations/implications

The SMQ was originally designed for science courses and the use of the translated and slightly modified version did not seem to be very sensitive in the IT learning context. A follow up study with different methodologies, would add to the weight of the present findings. In addition, future studies could focus on the particular factors that motivate students to learn IT and to achieve the learning objectives of the IT courses.

Practical implications

The intended outcome of this survey was to provide LIS students and instructors with an assessing tool to evaluate motivation to learn IT and the effectiveness of the strategies employed in the process of acquiring knowledge and skills. Based on the results, faculty members can provide learning environments that promote motivation towards learning and encourage students to select and use more advanced and effective learning strategies. In addition, the results of the study provide an additional argument for organizing a postgraduate program at the LIS Department of ATEI, Thessaloniki.

Originality/value

Empirical research on learning attitudes of LIS students is limited. Moreover, motivation and learning strategies use have never been studied in the Greek context of library education, although IT literacy is an essential task and all LIS Departments' instructors share the important goal of fostering students' motivation to learn IT.

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