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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Yu-Shan Hsu, Yu-Ping Chen, Margaret A. Shaffer and Flora F.T. Chiang

Drawing on expectancy value theory (EVT), this paper examines knowledge exchange between expatriate and host country national (HCN) dyads to understand whether receivers'…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on expectancy value theory (EVT), this paper examines knowledge exchange between expatriate and host country national (HCN) dyads to understand whether receivers' perceptions about senders' motivation to transfer knowledge and perceived value of the knowledge jointly affect receivers' motivation to learn and, in turn, facilitate their knowledge acquisition and sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

Latent moderated structural (LMS) equations were used to analyze data from 107 expatriate–HCN dyads working in the Asia Pacific region.

Findings

In general, whether senders are expatriates or HCNs, only when receivers perceive that (1) knowledge to be transferred is valuable and (2) senders are motivated to transfer, receivers are likely to be motivated to receive knowledge transferred from senders and, in turn, acquire and share knowledge with senders.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first in the expatriate and knowledge transfer literature to address the mixed findings between senders' motivation to transfer and receivers' knowledge acquisition and sharing by drawing on EVT.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Yoonhee Park, Doo Hun Lim and Jaeeun Lee

This study aims to examine the direct effects of job support and the indirect effects of individual career planning on the motivational process of training transfer, which…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the direct effects of job support and the indirect effects of individual career planning on the motivational process of training transfer, which consists of the structural relationship between learning goal orientation, learning motivation, transfer motivation and training transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to 255 respondents in South Korea, and 252 valid responses were used for analysis. A hypothetical model was examined using a structural equation model and multi-group analysis.

Findings

This study found that the synchronous process model of training transfer was well validated in the Korean context; moreover, job support promoted employee motivations that led to their training transfer. In addition, career planning was found to have a moderating role in the relationships explored in this study. That is, when the level of career planning was high, job support directly affected the motivation to transfer, and the link between intrinsic learning orientation and motivation to learn was highly activated compared to the group with a low level of career planning.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the single-dimensional measurement of its constructs, including job support, goal orientation and motivation to transfer. This limitation should be considered when interpreting the study’s results. In terms of implications, the study suggests that organizations should help individuals identify their career interests and establish a strategy to achieve their career goals by providing information about specific areas of interest.

Originality/value

This study proposes that the motivational mechanisms leading to training transfer are affected by trainees’ level of career planning. In addition, the study findings emphasize the importance of organizations’ role in guiding individual employees’ career planning to facilitate performance through training transfer.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Richard Walker, Kimberley Pressick-Kilborn, Erica Sainsbury and Judith MacCallum

Until recently, motivation has been considered to be an individual phenomenon. Motivational theorists have accordingly conceptualised key constructs in individualistic…

Abstract

Until recently, motivation has been considered to be an individual phenomenon. Motivational theorists have accordingly conceptualised key constructs in individualistic terms and emphasised the individual origins and nature of motivation, although they have also long recognised that contextual or social factors have a significant influence on these individual processes. Recently this conceptualisation has been questioned as theorists have suggested, after Vygotsky, that motivation, like learning and thinking, might be social in nature. This idea was first suggested by Sivan (1986) more than twenty years ago but it received a major impetus with the publication of an article by Hickey (1997) eleven years later. Since that time interest in the social nature of motivation has grown as a small number of book chapters and journal articles have been published and conference papers have been presented on the topic. Although some motivational theorists remain sceptical (e.g. Winne, 2004) of this theoretical development, the inclusion of a section on sociocultural approaches to motivation in Perry, Turner, and Meyer's (2006) chapter on classrooms as contexts for motivating learning in the 2nd edition of the Handbook of Educational Psychology suggests that this perspective is being seriously considered by motivational researchers. Similarly, the inclusion of a chapter (Walker, in press-b) on the sociocultural approach to motivation in the 3rd edition of the International Encyclopedia of Education indicates that this approach has achieved some recognition.

Details

The Decade Ahead: Applications and Contexts of Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-254-9

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Mary McCaslin and Alyson Leah Lavigne

Bruner (1985) once challenged learning theorists to define their model of the learner rather than design curriculum and instruction materials directed at a vague, and…

Abstract

Bruner (1985) once challenged learning theorists to define their model of the learner rather than design curriculum and instruction materials directed at a vague, and perhaps nonexistent, target. We suggest that motivation theorists do the same. The model of co-regulated learning that we describe (McCaslin, 2009) first posits learners who: (1) are social by nature (biological adaptations) and by nurture (socialization) (Baumeister & Leary, 1995; Geary, 2002; Olson & McCaslin, 2008); (2) have basic needs for participation and validation that can inform student dispositions toward school (McCaslin & Burross, 2008); and (3) differ in how and in what they participate – their adaptation (McCaslin & Burross, in press, p. xx). Second, the co-regulation model of the learner asserts that motivation and identity are mutually informative; what I am and am not willing to do inform who I am and the person I might become. Both motivation and identity are based on opportunities denied, taken, or missed and on the interpersonal relationships that do or do not support and validate them. Opportunities and relationships are based, in part, on cultural norms and challenges that delineate individuals historically and presently in time and place (see McCaslin, 2009 for full explication of these and related constructs). Motivation is at the core of identity. Thus, motivations of today's learners inform not only their school achievements, but also the adults they may become. If motivation is the core of emergent identity now and in the future, what then is at the core of motivation?

Details

The Decade Ahead: Applications and Contexts of Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-254-9

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Brian Matthews, Jamie Daigle and Joy Cooper

The purpose of this study is to validate multiplicative cycle that exists between the job readiness and satisfaction model explored by Matthews et al. (2018), the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to validate multiplicative cycle that exists between the job readiness and satisfaction model explored by Matthews et al. (2018), the satisfaction and performance paradigmatic nuances analyzed by Judge et al. (2001) and Gu and Chi (2009), in addition to the expectancy model theorized by Vroom (1964). The motivation to transfer learning serves as a conveyable variable transmitted within a learning continuum that sustains cyclical outputs.

Design/methodology/approach

An archetype to explore the connection between the three hypothesized theories is created through a neural network program. Exploring this connection develops deeper understandings of the derivatives of employee motivation as it pertains to its effect on readiness, satisfaction, performance and achievement dyads. A detailed analysis of the literature leads to the hypothesis that the motivation to transfer learning creates a multiplicative effect among hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The neural network program scaffolds the proposed general belief that positive effects of transfer motives cause a cyclical effect that continues to perpetuate among hypothesized dyads. Conversely, if this motivation decreases or ceases among one or more dyads, the cyclical effect will retract and, eventually stop.

Originality/value

Based on the neurologic outcome, one central theme emerged: managers must offer opportunities to acquire knowledge through assistive mechanisms (i.e. training) by providing external stability through controlled channels that activates the motivation to transfer learning into new opportunities. The transference of this knowledge produces reconstructive growth opportunities through continuous learning thus increasing performance.

目的

本研究的目的、除了驗證弗魯姆 (Vroom) (1964) 建立的「期望模型」理論外,也去驗證存在於工作準備就緒與馬修斯等人 (Matthews et al.) (2018) 所探索的滿足感模型之間的倍增週期,及質治等人 (Judge et al.) (2001) 和池 (Gu & Chi) (2009) 所分析的滿足感及表現之範式細微差別。學習轉移的動機作為一個被傳送至學習漸變體內的可輸送變量而運作,而這個學習漸變體是會維持週期性的輸出的。

研究設計/方法/理念

透過神經網絡程序,創造一個用以探索這三個假設性理論之間的關係的原型。探究這些關係,會使我們更能深入了解僱員動機的衍生品,因這涉及僱員動機對準備就緒、滿足感、表現及功績二元體的影響。仔細分析文獻帶出了一個假設,就是: 學習轉移的動機會在各假設的關係裏創造一個倍增的效果。

研究結果

這個神經網絡程序續步闡釋了一個被倡議的普遍觀念,那就是轉移動機的正面影響會帶來一個在假設性的二元體中會繼續持續下去的週期性效應。相反地,如果這動機在一個或多個二元體中減弱或停止,這週期性效應將會撤回及最終停止。

研究的原創性/價值

基於神經病學的結果,一個核心主題浮現了, 就是:管理人員必須提供透過輔助機制 (就是說:培訓) 而獲取知識的機會。方法是給會引發把學習轉為新機會的動機之受控渠道、提供外在穩定性。這知識的轉移,透過不斷學習而創造重建的成長,表現因而得以提升。

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Dan S. Chiaburu and Amanuel G. Tekleab

To investigate individual and contextual antecedents of learning, transfer of learning, training generalization and training maintenance in a work context.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate individual and contextual antecedents of learning, transfer of learning, training generalization and training maintenance in a work context.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression analysis on data obtained from 119 employees who attended training programs.

Findings

The data supported the relationship between continuous‐learning culture and supervisor support and training motivation. Although training motivation was directly related only to training maintenance, it interacted with performance goal orientation in affecting training transfer and generalization.

Practical implications

Practitioners interested in designing interventions directed at increasing similar training outcomes can use various approaches aimed at assessing and monitoring factors such as continuous‐learning culture, supervisor support and training motivation. More importantly, based on the current results, practitioners can manage selectively the performance goal orientation of their trainees, given its differential relationship with training outcomes.

Originality/value

The findings are valuable for researchers and practitioners. From a theoretical perspective, the study offers a better‐specified model of training effectiveness by including both contextual and individual factors important for improving training effectiveness. Practitioners can use these ideas to design corresponding training and training transfer interventions.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Rita Alvelos, Aristides I Ferreira and Reid Bates

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived content validity, transfer design, the motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer, contribute to the effectiveness of training.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample used consisted of 202 employees with ages between 18 and 60 years, working for an insurance company where they had training for a period of three months.

Findings

The results show a relationship between perceived content validity and transfer design, as well as with the motivation to improve work through learning. A mediating role of social support was also evident in this relationship. Finally, the authors highlight the findings of the relationship between motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the literature by demonstrating how the role of social support can increase training effectiveness in organizations.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2017

Irene Hau Siu Chow

The purpose of this paper is to explain how and under what condition empowering leadership is related to employee creativity from the social exchange and motivational perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how and under what condition empowering leadership is related to employee creativity from the social exchange and motivational perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 535 supervisor-subordinate dyads using online questionnaire survey.

Findings

Employee openness to experience (a creative personality) moderated the indirect effect of empowering leadership on employee creativity via either motivation to learn or trust in leader. The indirect effect of empowering leadership on creativity via motivation to learn occurs only for employees with lower level of openness to experience, whereas that via trust in leader occurs only for employees with higher level of openness to experience.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional research design is a major concern.

Practical implications

The findings offer guidance to help practitioners or executives to stimulate subordinates motivation to increase their creative performance through learning and trust that matched with the individual’s openness to experience, thereby improving the effectiveness of empowering leadership.

Originality/value

This study extend our understanding on the mechanism linking empowering leadership and employee creativity by testing the mediating influences of motivation to learn and trust in leader and the moderating influence of openness to experience.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2019

Eun-Jee Kim, Sunyoung Park and Hye-Seung (Theresa) Kang

The purpose of this study is to augment knowledge of how work environment and personal characteristics affect intention to transfer in a work context. This study aims to

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to augment knowledge of how work environment and personal characteristics affect intention to transfer in a work context. This study aims to investigate the factors that can influence intention to transfer training in a professional development training context. The study examined the predictive capacity of organizational support, supervisor support, training readiness and learning motivation on transfer intention among the study respondents.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from teachers in secondary schools in the USA. The structural equation modeling method was adopted to analyze 216 responses using a self-report survey.

Findings

We found that (a) organizational support was directly associated with supervisor support for training, (b) supervisor support for training significantly influenced training readiness and motivation to learn, (c) training readiness positively affected motivation to learn, and (d) motivation to learn positively influenced intention to transfer. In addition, supervisor support mediated the relationships between organizational support and training readiness and between organizational support and motivation to learn. Training readiness linked intention to transfer and motivation to learn. Motivation to learn also played a mediating role in the relationship between supervisor support and intention to transfer.

Originality/value

Our findings add to the academic work on training transfer by empirically analyzing how both the environment (e.g. organizational support) and individual factors (e.g. learning motivation) influence employees’ intention to transfer. In particular, we investigated the potential impact of both organizational support and supervisory support on intentions to transfer, compared to previous studies emphasizing only supervisory support to improve training outcomes.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Ursula Paola Torres Maldonado, Gohar Feroz Khan, Junghoon Moon and Jae Jeung Rho

The purpose of this paper is to: empirically validate a modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model by adding an “e‐learning motivation”…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: empirically validate a modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model by adding an “e‐learning motivation” construct in the South American context; try to determine the role of e‐learning motivation in the use and adoption of e‐learning systems and conversely the effect of technology on students' e‐learning motivation; and to test region and gender as moderators in the model.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was used to collect data from 47 schools located at different regions: the coast, Andes, and jungle of Peru. The partial least square technique was used for data analysis.

Findings

It was found that “e‐learning motivation” and “social influence” had a positive influence on behavioural intention, while “facilitating condition” had no effect on e‐learning portal use. Furthermore, use behaviour had a positive influence on e‐learning motivation. Also found was the moderating role of “region”.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is carried out in a single country, thus, caution should be taken in generalisation of the results.

Practical implications

The findings will help policy makers and practitioners in developing countries to better understand students' e‐learning motivation.

Originality/value

By adopting the UTAUT model, a new construct of “e‐learning motivation” is added, and applied to the South American context.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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