Search results

1 – 4 of 4
Article
Publication date: 29 January 2024

Aditi Sarkar Sengupta, Marla Royne Stafford and Alexa K. Fox

The authors' research examines how negative electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) alters focal customers' post-recovery justice perceptions and attitudes to determine their future…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors' research examines how negative electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) alters focal customers' post-recovery justice perceptions and attitudes to determine their future behavior with the service provider. Specifically, this paper develops and tests a conceptual model to investigate how negative e-WOM alters focal customers' perceptual and attitudinal outcomes after the service recovery experience. It also examines the post-recovery effect of negative e-WOM on focal customers’ willingness to patronize the service after their recovery experience.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, two pretests and two experimental studies with created scenarios in the retail context were conducted.

Findings

The authors' findings reveal that services are judged during and well beyond failure and recovery occurrences. To maintain a loyal customer base, service managers should develop processes that address service complaints both within and beyond the service consumption stage. The authors also find that despite a favorable recovery, focal customers gravitate toward the failure experience and develop unfavorable attitudes toward the service provider, leading to likely defections.

Originality/value

The authors' research demonstrates the persuasive power of negative e-WOM at the post-service recovery stage, making a unique contribution to the service recovery literature. This research also contributes to the persuasive effect of negative e-WOM, demonstrating message context as a boundary condition of negative e-WOM effects. In general, the authors' work highlights the importance of understanding the psychological processes involved in eliciting the persuasive influence of negative e-WOM in the post-service recovery stage that may lead to the defection of “so-called” successfully recovered customers.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Aditi Sarkar Sengupta and Sreejesh S. Pillai

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, the authors investigate the influence of other customer perception (OCP) on focal customer’s service quality perception and service…

1770

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, the authors investigate the influence of other customer perception (OCP) on focal customer’s service quality perception and service revisit intention in hotel services. Second, they examine whether negative effects of OCP can be managed through customer participation. Finally, they examine the effectiveness of CP as a strategy when individuals vary in terms of their need for uniqueness (NFU).

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (OCP: favorable versus unfavorable) × 2 (customer participation: customer participation versus no customer participation) × 2 (NFU: high versus low) between-subjects experiment was conducted to collect responses. Analysis of variance and pre-planned contrast tests were carried out to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Customers who are exposed to unfavorable OCP reported low service quality evaluation and revisit intention. However, two-way interaction results supported that in unfavorable OCP situation, customers who are exposed to high customer participation have reported high revisit intention compared to those who are not exposed to customer participation. In addition, the three-way interaction effects indicate that customer participation may work as an intervention mechanism to reduce the negative effects of OCP to form favorable service quality perception and revisit intention only for customers with low NFU.

Originality/value

This is the first in its stream of studies examining the following research questions: “Can the negative effects of OCP be mitigated with the help of managerial intervention?”; and “Would a customer’s individual differences influence the effectiveness of such an intervention strategy?”

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Aditi Sarkar Sengupta and Sreejesh S

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of other customer perception (OCP) (Brocato et al., 2012) on focal customer’s service quality perception and revisit intention…

1154

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of other customer perception (OCP) (Brocato et al., 2012) on focal customer’s service quality perception and revisit intention in high- and low-involvement services and the effect of customer’s need for uniqueness (NFU) as a boundary condition of the above relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a theoretical methodology, hypotheses were developed to analyze the effect of OCP, service involvement and customer’s NFU. A 2 × 2 × 2 scenario-based experiment was designed. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The analysis reveals that the presence of conforming (versus non-conforming) other customers improves service quality perception and revisit intention of focal customers in high-involvement services, but not in low-involvement services. However, the relationship between similarity perception and outcome variables does not hold good for high-NFU customers.

Practical implications

This study suggests that conforming and non-conforming other customers are critical in forming service quality perception of high-involvement services, and highlights the boundary condition of this relationship. If service managers take service involvement and individual differences into account, and strategize their service offering aligned to their target customers, influence of other customers can be managed more efficiently.

Originality/value

As this study is one of the first empirical studies to focus on the effect of OCP on service quality perception and examine its boundary condition, it contributes significantly to the body of knowledge. Future research directions are discussed and managerial implications are proposed.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Aditi Sarkar Sengupta, Ugur Yavas and Emin Babakus

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of person-job (P-J) fit on the impact of organizational resources (training and service technology), and a personal…

1735

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of person-job (P-J) fit on the impact of organizational resources (training and service technology), and a personal resource (customer orientation) on frontline bank employees’ job performance and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale survey of 530 frontline employees of a national bank in New Zealand serves as the study setting.

Findings

Among others, results show that P-J fit fully mediates the impact of training on turnover intentions and job performance.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the study does not allow causal inferences. Therefore, future studies should adopt longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

Management should be careful in planning and providing organizational resources to frontline employees to enhance their perception of P-J fit. Also investing in the recruitment and selection of customer-oriented frontline employees would be a prudent course of action.

Originality/value

Empirical research in the banking services literature pertaining to the mediating role of P-J fit is scarce. There is also a lack of research regarding the interaction between personal and organizational resources resulting in complementary or supplementary effects on frontline employees’ fit perceptions. This study fills in the void in both areas.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

1 – 4 of 4