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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2023

Aamir Ali Chughtai

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of trust propensity on both objective (salary) and subjective (career satisfaction) indicators of career success and investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of trust propensity on both objective (salary) and subjective (career satisfaction) indicators of career success and investigate the mediating role of organizational identification in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for this study consisted of 187 Pakistani employees who were selected from three units of a large footwear company. The research hypotheses were tested through structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results showed that as theorized, organizational identification fully mediated the effects of trust propensity on salary and career satisfaction.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study which has explored the effects of trust propensity on objective and subjective measures of career success. Furthermore, this paper highlights one possible pathway in the form of organizational identification through which trust propensity relates to different career outcomes.

Article
Publication date: 15 April 2022

Aamir Ali Chughtai

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethical leadership on negative feedback-seeking behavior (NFSB). In addition, it sought to investigate the mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethical leadership on negative feedback-seeking behavior (NFSB). In addition, it sought to investigate the mediating role of psychological safety and job involvement in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for this study comprised 238 primary and secondary school teachers who were selected from three private sector schools operating in Pakistan. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Results revealed that as expected, psychological safety and job involvement fully mediated the effects of ethical leadership on NFSB.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study that has empirically established a connection between ethical leadership and NFSB. Furthermore, it uncovers two distinct mechanisms in the form of psychological safety and job involvement through which ethical leadership can influence NFSB.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Aamir Ali Chughtai and Shehla R. Arifeen

This study aims to examine the impact of humble leadership on both objective (salary) and subjective (career satisfaction) measures of career success and to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of humble leadership on both objective (salary) and subjective (career satisfaction) measures of career success and to investigate the mediating role of innovative work behavior in this relationship. Furthermore, this study also explores the moderating role of affective commitment to the supervisor (ACS) in the relationship between humble leadership and innovative work behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Sample for this study consisted of 220 employees who were selected from four food and beverage companies based in Pakistan. The research hypotheses were tested through multiple regression analyses, moderated regression analyses and the bootstrapping procedure.

Findings

Results showed that innovative work behavior fully mediated the effects of humble leadership on salary, while it partially mediated the effects of humble leadership on career satisfaction. In addition, it was found that ACS moderates the relationship between humble leadership and innovative work behavior such that the relationship is stronger when ACS is high. Finally, results revealed that ACS also moderates the indirect effect of humble leadership on salary and career satisfaction.

Originality/value

This is the first study, which has examined the effects of humble leadership on both objective and subjective measures of career success. In addition, by exploring the mediating role of innovative work behavior and moderating role of ACS, this research sheds light on how and when humble leadership is most effective in facilitating employees' career success.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 61 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Aamir Chughtai

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of servant leadership on perceived employability and examine the mediating role of three proactive career behaviours…

1971

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of servant leadership on perceived employability and examine the mediating role of three proactive career behaviours, namely, career planning, skill development and networking behaviour in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected from 176 employees who were working in a large food and beverage company operating in Pakistan. Structural equation modelling and the bootstrapping procedure were used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that servant leadership was positively related to career planning, skill development and networking behaviour, which, in turn, were positively associated with perceived employability. Furthermore, it was found that the three proactive career behaviours fully mediated the effects of servant leadership on perceived employability.

Practical implications

The findings of this study indicate that servant leadership can play a key role in enhancing workers’ employability. Thus, it is important that organisations focus on creating conditions, which help them to develop servant leaders.

Originality/value

This is the first study, which has empirically established a link between servant leadership and perceived employability. In addition, it uncovers three distinct mechanisms in the form of career planning, networking behaviour and skill development through which servant leadership can influence workers’ employability.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Aamir Chughtai

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of authentic leadership on employees’ objective (hierarchical status) and subjective (career satisfaction) career success. In…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of authentic leadership on employees’ objective (hierarchical status) and subjective (career satisfaction) career success. In addition, this paper attempts to examine the mediating role of career self-efficacy in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for this cross-sectional study comprised of 162 Pakistani employees drawn from a leading food and beverage company. Structural equation modelling and the bootstrapping procedure were used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that career self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between authentic leadership and hierarchical status, while it partially mediated the effects of authentic leadership on career satisfaction.

Practical implications

The findings of this study indicate that authentic leadership behaviours can have a positive impact on employees’ career success. Thus, in order to ensure that employees accomplish their career goals and realise their full potential, it is vital that organisations devise strategies, which are geared towards promoting authentic leadership.

Originality/value

This paper provides a first examination of the relationship between authentic leadership and two indicators of career success: hierarchical status and career satisfaction. In addition, it identifies one possible pathway in the form of career self-efficacy through which authentic leadership relates to employees’ career success.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2011

Aamir Ali Chughtai and Finian Buckley

The present paper aims to explore the effects of state (trust in supervisor) and trait (trust propensity) trust on employees' work engagement. Furthermore, it seeks to investigate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to explore the effects of state (trust in supervisor) and trait (trust propensity) trust on employees' work engagement. Furthermore, it seeks to investigate the mediating role of learning goal orientation in the relationship between work engagement and two forms of performance: in‐role job performance and innovative work behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this cross sectional survey study were collected from 168 research scientists drawn from six Irish science research centres. Structural equation modelling was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that both trust in supervisor and trust propensity were positively and significantly related to work engagement. Additionally, results indicate that learning goal orientation partially mediated the effects of work engagement on in‐role job performance and innovative work behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited by two main factors: the cross‐sectional research design, and use of self‐reported questionnaire data. Limitations aside, this study provides evidence that a climate of trust can fuel work engagement, which in turn, is likely to promote learning, innovation and performance.

Originality/value

This paper extends the developing engagement literature in two ways. First, it empirically establishes an association between two facets of trust and work engagement. Second, it highlights the role of learning goal orientation in explaining the linkage between work engagement and job performance.

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Aamir Ali Chughtai

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between affective commitment to the supervisor and three work outcomes: innovative work behaviour and two types of…

2562

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between affective commitment to the supervisor and three work outcomes: innovative work behaviour and two types of learning behaviours, namely, feedback seeking for self‐improvement and error reporting. Additionally, it seeks to examine the mediating role of work engagement in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 192 research scientists from six science research centres in Ireland completed self‐reported questionnaires. Structural equation modelling was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Results indicated that as hypothesised, work engagement fully mediated the link between affective commitment to the supervisor and the three employee outcomes included in this study.

Research limitations/implications

The cross sectional design of this study does not permit causal inferences. Additionally, all data were self‐reported and therefore common method variance may be an issue. Despite these limitations, the results suggest that affective commitment to the supervisor is likely to enhance employees' work engagement, innovativeness and learning. These findings imply that building employees' commitment to their supervisors can be a potent strategy for increasing individual and organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

This is the first study which has linked supervisory commitment to innovative work behaviour, feedback seeking and error reporting. Furthermore, it highlights one potential mechanism in the form of work engagement through which supervisory commitment relates to these work outcomes.

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Aamir Ali Chughtai and Finian Buckley

The main purpose of this study is to examine the impact of organizational identification on in‐role job performance and two learning behaviours, namely, feedback seeking and error…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to examine the impact of organizational identification on in‐role job performance and two learning behaviours, namely, feedback seeking and error communication. Furthermore, this research aims to establish the mediating role of learning goal orientation in the relationship between organizational identification and the three outcome variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this paper were gathered from 130 high school teachers drawn from six schools operating in Pakistan. Multiple regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that organizational identification has significant unique effects on in‐role job performance and error communication; whereas, it influences feedback seeking indirectly through learning goal orientation. Additionally, the findings of this paper reveal that learning goal orientation mediates the effects of organizational identification on the three outcome variables.

Research limitations/implications

The present paper uses a cross‐sectional research design and hence it is not possible to make inferences about causation. Also, the data for this study are collected from a single source, which creates the problem of common method variance. However, in spite of these limitations the results of this study indicate that organizational identification can play a pivotal role in enhancing organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

This is the first study which assesses the impact of organizational identification on learning goal orientation, feedback seeking and error communication. Moreover, it is one of the few studies which has empirically established the link between organizational identification and job performance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Aamir Ali Chughtai and Finian Buckley

The main purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of faculty's trust in the school principal on three school outcomes, namely, self‐reported in‐role job performance (IRP)…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of faculty's trust in the school principal on three school outcomes, namely, self‐reported in‐role job performance (IRP), organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) and learning goal orientation (LGO). Furthermore, this paper aims to highlight the role of organizational identification (OID) and work engagement (Eng) in explaining the linkage between trust in the principal (TIP) and the three outcome variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data are collected from 130 high school teachers in Pakistan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses are used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results of this paper revealed that OID and Eng fully mediated the relationship between TIP and IRP; whereas, they partially mediated the effects of TIP on OCB and LGO.

Research limitations/implications

The data used in this paper are cross‐sectional and hence causation cannot be determined. Additionally, the data for this paper are collected from a single source, which may create problem of common method variance. Nevertheless, the results of this paper provide ample testimony to the fact that faculty TIP is a key determinant of school effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper extends the literature by providing insights into two processes through which TIP can affect performance and learning orientation of teachers.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Marann Byrne, Aamir Chughtai, Barbara Flood, Evelyn Murphy and Pauline Willis

The purpose of this paper is to assess the levels of burnout experienced by accounting and finance academics in Ireland.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the levels of burnout experienced by accounting and finance academics in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this cross‐sectional survey study were collected from 100 accounting and finance academics teaching in Irish third level institutions. Independent sample t‐tests, one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and step‐wise multiple regression analysis were used to analyse the data.

Findings

Results indicate that the majority of accounting and finance academics experience low or average burnout with regard to emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation but encounter a high degree of burnout with regard to personal accomplishment. While none of the background or workload variables captured in the study explain variation in the levels of burnout experienced, some aspects of job satisfaction are significant predictors of the three dimensions of burnout.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of this study does not allow causal inferences to be made. Furthermore, since all data were self‐reported, it is possible that common method variance may be an issue. Despite these limitations, results suggest that increasing faculty members’ job satisfaction can be a useful strategy for preventing academic burnout.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the issue of burnout among academics in an Irish context. Moreover, it is one of the few studies, which has explored the phenomenon of burnout among university faculty members.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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