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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Klaus J. Templer, Jeffrey C. Kennedy and Riyang Phang

Customer orientation of service employees relates to customer satisfaction and loyalty, sales growth and business performance. Drawing from conservation of resources (COR…

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1083

Abstract

Purpose

Customer orientation of service employees relates to customer satisfaction and loyalty, sales growth and business performance. Drawing from conservation of resources (COR) theory, the aim of this study was to test the interactive effects of service employees' role clarity and learning goal orientation on customer orientation. Specifically, it was hypothesized that even under conditions of low role clarity, service employees with high learning goal orientation would maintain a high level of customer orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 323 employees of 4- and 5-star hotels in Singapore. Using questionnaires, they reported their role clarity, learning goal orientation and customer orientation. For hypothesis testing, moderated regression analysis was performed.

Findings

Role clarity and learning goal orientation were significantly related to customer orientation, and in support of the hypothesis, the interaction effect of role clarity and learning goal orientation was also significant. With high role clarity, all employees showed high customer orientation. But with low role clarity, only employees with high learning goal orientation demonstrated high customer orientation.

Practical implications

The recommendations from this study are to include learning goal orientation as a selection criterion for service employees and to clearly define the roles of existing service employees, especially for those with low learning goal orientation.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this study lies in highlighting the importance of learning goal orientation especially under conditions of low role clarity.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Shu‐chi Lin and Jung‐nung Chang

To provide a further examination into the explanatory factors of employees' mobility for organizations wishing to improve performance by keeping right employees judging…

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5397

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a further examination into the explanatory factors of employees' mobility for organizations wishing to improve performance by keeping right employees judging from their goal orientation and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The multivariate statistical methods (MANOVA) together with a longitudinal design are used to test the hypotheses generated from the theory with data gathered from two Taiwan‐based financial institutions.

Findings

Suggests that those who quit for what they perceive as upwardly mobile career moves and those who enjoy in‐house promotions both demonstrate a greater degree of positive learning goal orientation than their colleagues who remain stationary in long‐term positions with the same firm. Makes note of the inability of performance goal orientation and organizational commitment to explain employee mobility behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability is limited due to the concentration of this longitudinal‐design study on two institutions of a single industry in Taiwan.

Practical implications

Provides a positive advice for organizations to create mechanisms and environment that can engage learning‐oriented employees as meaningful contributors in principal challenges and to use learning experiences to revitalize them and deepen their commitment.

Originality/value

This paper clarifies the influence of goal orientation and organizational commitment upon employees' mobility and identifies their relationship with findings suggesting a direct link between positive learning goal orientation and positive job performance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Hannes Zacher and Nerina L. Jimmieson

Based on substitutes for leadership theory, the aim of this study is to examine followers' learning goal orientation as a moderator of relationships among transformational…

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2877

Abstract

Purpose

Based on substitutes for leadership theory, the aim of this study is to examine followers' learning goal orientation as a moderator of relationships among transformational leadership, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and sales productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data came from 61 food and beverage attendants of a casino, and were analyzed using regression analyses.

Findings

Transformational leadership was positively related to both OCB and sales productivity. Learning goal orientation moderated the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB, such that transformational leadership was more strongly related to OCB among followers with a low learning goal orientation than among followers with a high learning goal orientation.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the small sample size and cross‐sectional research design.

Practical implications

Organizations could train supervisors to practice a transformational leadership style and to take followers' learning goal orientation into account.

Originality/value

The findings of this study suggest that, with regard to OCB, a high learning goal orientation of followers may act as a “substitute” for low levels of leaders' transformational leadership.

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

T. Brad Harris, Wonjoon Chung, Holly M. Hutchins and Dan S. Chiaburu

– The purpose of this paper was to examine the additive and joint effects of trainer directiveness and trainees’ learning goal orientation on training satisfaction and transfer.

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8860

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the additive and joint effects of trainer directiveness and trainees’ learning goal orientation on training satisfaction and transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from a sample (N = 243) of undergraduate business students enrolled at a large US university were examined.

Findings

Trainer directiveness and trainee learning goal orientations each additively predicted training satisfaction and transfer over and above one another and study controls. Further, trainer directiveness and trainee learning goal orientation jointly predicted satisfaction and transfer, such that the positive relationship between trainer directiveness and both outcomes was accentuated (more positive) when learning goal orientations were high (compared to low).

Practical implications

This study suggests that scholars and practitioners need to be mindful of both trainer and trainee characteristics when evaluating potential training programs. In addition to selecting competent trainers, organizations might be well-served to encourage trainers to use a directive style. Further, organizations might be able to boost the positive effects of trainer directiveness on trainee satisfaction and transfer by priming (or selecting on) trainee learning goal orientations.

Originality/value

With few exceptions, prior research has devoted comparatively little attention toward understanding how trainer characteristics influence training outcomes. Of this research, even less considers possible interactions between trainer and trainee characteristics. The present study provides an initial step toward addressing these gaps by examining the additive and joint influences of trainer directiveness and trainee learning goal orientations. Results support that additional variance in training satisfaction and transfer can be explained by considering both trainer and trainee characteristics in tandem.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Yi-chun Lin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between protean career attitude and perceived internal and external employability, along with the mediating…

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2648

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between protean career attitude and perceived internal and external employability, along with the mediating effect of learning-goal orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by distributing paper-based questionnaires to 527 workers in private banking sectors in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the results of the relationships.

Findings

The results supported the idea that protean career attitude is a significant antecedent of perceived internal and external employability. Protean talents with a higher degree of protean attitude toward value-driven career orientation and self-directed career management have an external employability that is greater than their internal employability. Learning-goal orientation fully mediated the effect of protean career attitude on perceived internal employability, but only partially mediated external employability.

Practical implications

The findings can help human resource managers gain a better understanding of the use of an appropriate strategy to influence an employee’s perceived internal and external employability, which can increase the motivation and improve employer-employee relationships that contribute to organizational success and performance. Employees should recognize the increased importance of continuous learning with goal-setting in order to deal with changes at work.

Originality/value

This paper empirically establishes the association between protean career attitude and perceived internal and external employability. The protean career concept may provide organizations with a valuable perspective in the evolution of careers. Valuable and protean talents place an emphasis on individuals’ core values, and while learning goals are meant to suit employer organizations, they may also establish opportunities that could cross-organizational boundaries.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Baek‐Kyoo (Brian) Joo and Sunyoung Park

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of personal characteristics (goal orientation) and contextual characteristics (organizational learning culture and…

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16681

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of personal characteristics (goal orientation) and contextual characteristics (organizational learning culture and developmental feedback) on employees' career satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were drawn from four Fortune Global 500 companies in Korea. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to explain the variance in outcome variables.

Findings

The results indicate that career satisfaction is predicted by organizational learning culture and performance goal orientation. Organizational learning culture, developmental feedback, and learning goal orientation are the significant predictors of organizational commitment. Finally, organizational learning culture, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment turn out to be the predictors of turnover intention.

Practical implications

By enhancing organizational learning culture and by considering goal orientation, human resource development/organization development practitioners could play important roles in improving organizational commitment, in career satisfaction, and in decreasing turnover.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this paper lies in its inclusive approach encompassing both the personal and contextual factors (such as organizational learning, leadership, and personality) on career and organizational commitment research. It is an interesting finding that while performance goal is associated with career satisfaction, learning goal orientation is related with organizational commitment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Nicholas G. Paparoidamis

Although sales managers influence to a great extent their salespeople's outcomes, research examining the impact of leadership effectiveness and learning orientation in the…

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3550

Abstract

Purpose

Although sales managers influence to a great extent their salespeople's outcomes, research examining the impact of leadership effectiveness and learning orientation in the sales department is limited. As such, an investigation of the impact of sales managers' learning values and leadership – on the grounds of goal‐setting and leader‐member exchange (LMX) theories – on salespeople's goal orientation and performance is warranted. This paper aims to investigate these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore these issues, the author presents the extant literature on learning orientation, goal orientation and leadership quality, in an effort to provide the basis for the development of theoretical propositions. A strategic learning pathway is proposed for further research indicating that sales managers' learning orientation and leadership affect salespeople's goal orientation and performance.

Practical implications

Each of the underlying propositions is explored and managerial and research implications are identified. The proposed model indicates that it is vital for sales managers to pursue strategic learning and create favourable learning conditions and processes that facilitate organisational learning and change.

Originality/value

The research framework provides a new perspective to sales managers for strategic implementation of learning practices in the sales environment.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Alan F. Coad and Anthony J. Berry

States that two goal orientations may be held by individuals: a performance goal and a learning goal (Ames and Archer, 1988; Dweck and Leggett, 1988). The much‐discussed…

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9566

Abstract

States that two goal orientations may be held by individuals: a performance goal and a learning goal (Ames and Archer, 1988; Dweck and Leggett, 1988). The much‐discussed learning organisation requires individuals either to possess or to develop a learning orientation. Leadership theorists (Bass, 1985; Burns, 1978) have identified characteristics of leadership which may be classified as transactional or transformational. The links between leadership and goal orientation are explored. It was conjectured that transformational leadership would be associated with a learninggoal orientation and transactional leadership would be associated with a performance‐goal orientation. These propositions are supported by evidence from an empirical study of professional accountants in the UK. The findings suggest that desirable leadership behaviour for a learning organisation is transformational and desirable follower behaviour should include a learning orientation.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Ceyda Maden

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between employees’ perceptions of high-involvement human resource (HR) practices, their levels of work engagement…

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4005

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between employees’ perceptions of high-involvement human resource (HR) practices, their levels of work engagement and learning goal orientation, and their proactive behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of the study included 240 employees who work in Istanbul, Turkey, chosen from the major industries that represent the economic profile of this city. The hypotheses were tested with structural equation modeling procedure.

Findings

The results revealed that apart from perceived recognition, all the perceived high-involvement HR practices were positively related to employees’ work engagement, which in turn predicted their learning goal orientation. Besides, the results indicated that work engagement affected both individual innovation and feedback inquiry significantly, whereas learning goal orientation predicted only feedback inquiry. Finally, the findings revealed that only perceived empowerment and competency development practices were linked to feedback inquiry through work engagement and learning goal orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the findings is limited. The data are based on self-report and the use of cross-sectional data does not allow any definite conclusions to be drawn about causality.

Practical implications

Organizations that aim to increase employee proactivity need first to identify the means of increasing work engagement. One way of increasing engagement levels among employees is to invest in various kinds of supportive, high-involvement HR practices, such as competence development and information sharing.

Originality/value

This study explores the notion of high-involvement HR practices with employee proactivity in an integrative way by viewing work engagement as a latent mechanism that links high-involvement HR practices to proactive behaviors both directly and indirectly via increased learning goal orientation.

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Aamir Ali Chughtai and Finian Buckley

The main purpose of this study is to examine the impact of organizational identification on in‐role job performance and two learning behaviours, namely, feedback seeking…

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3179

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to examine the impact of organizational identification on in‐role job performance and two learning behaviours, namely, feedback seeking and error communication. Furthermore, this research aims to establish the mediating role of learning goal orientation in the relationship between organizational identification and the three outcome variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this paper were gathered from 130 high school teachers drawn from six schools operating in Pakistan. Multiple regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that organizational identification has significant unique effects on in‐role job performance and error communication; whereas, it influences feedback seeking indirectly through learning goal orientation. Additionally, the findings of this paper reveal that learning goal orientation mediates the effects of organizational identification on the three outcome variables.

Research limitations/implications

The present paper uses a cross‐sectional research design and hence it is not possible to make inferences about causation. Also, the data for this study are collected from a single source, which creates the problem of common method variance. However, in spite of these limitations the results of this study indicate that organizational identification can play a pivotal role in enhancing organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

This is the first study which assesses the impact of organizational identification on learning goal orientation, feedback seeking and error communication. Moreover, it is one of the few studies which has empirically established the link between organizational identification and job performance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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