To read this content please select one of the options below:

Effect of chronotype on diet and sleep quality in healthy female students: night lark versus early bird

Mahmut Bodur (Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
Şahika Nur Bidar (Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University, Ankara, Turkey)
Hülya Yardimci (Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)

Nutrition & Food Science

ISSN: 0034-6659

Article publication date: 8 June 2021

Issue publication date: 6 September 2021

496

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of chronotype on diet and sleep quality in healthy female students.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted in 197 healthy female students and were grouped in morning, intermediate and evening types according to the Horne and Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). Assessment included sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); physical activity level using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF); dietary intake using the 24-h dietary recall; and diet quality using the Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015).

Findings

In this study, no significant difference was found between chronotypes in terms of general nutritional habits, age, smoking status, anthropometric measurements and physical activity levels. However, evening-type individuals had poor sleep quality (p = 0.040) and having issues about sleep latency (p = 0.049) and daytime dysfunction (p = 0.044), and they had had lower intake of whole fruit (p = 0.002), total fruit (p = 0.024) and higher consumption of refined grains (p < 0.001). Although, among chronotypes, there is no difference in the intake of protein, saturated fat, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and dietary fiber, evening-type individuals’ daily energy (p = 0.013), fat (p = 0.021) and carbohydrate intake (p = 0.033) were higher.

Originality/value

In conclusion, further research is required to understand the relationship between chronotype, diet and sleep quality. This study is one of the limited studies that examines sleep quality, daily energy and macronutrient intake and diet quality together for healthy women.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully thank the volunteers for the participation of the study. The authors also thank trained dietician Osman Sönük, dietician Gözde Kocaman and dietician Perihan Kızılkaya for their contributions to data collection.

Conflict of interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest with any institution or organization.

Declaration of interest statement: This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

Author contribution: MB designed the study, collected and analyzed data, wrote and finalized the manuscript; SNB collected data collection, wrote the manuscript; HY read and approved the final manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Citation

Bodur, M., Bidar, Ş.N. and Yardimci, H. (2021), "Effect of chronotype on diet and sleep quality in healthy female students: night lark versus early bird", Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 51 No. 7, pp. 1138-1149. https://doi.org/10.1108/NFS-01-2021-0008

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

Related articles