Does organic food taste better? A claim substantiation approach

Laurence Fillion (Laurence Fillion is Senior Consumer Scientist, at the Sensory and Consumer Science Group at the Leatherhead Food Research Association, Leatherhead, UK.)
Stacey Arazi (Stacey Arazi is Sensory Scientist, at the Sensory and Consumer Science Group at the Leatherhead Food Research Association, Leatherhead, UK.)

Nutrition & Food Science

ISSN: 0034-6659

Publication date: 1 August 2002

Abstract

As the demand for organic foods has grown globally, disputes have arisen on whether organic foods are more nutritious, safer, and better for the environment. To many consumers, though, a major issue is whether organic foods taste different and, especially if they are being asked to pay a premium price, whether they taste better. Via the use of sensory analysis using trained panellists, and consumer testing, research was carried out to determine whether the claim of “organic food tastes better” could be substantiated. The study found that organic orange juice was perceived as tasting better than conventional orange juice; however, no differences were found between organic and conventional milk. Therefore, it is concluded that the global claim that “organic food tastes better” is not valid, and each product type should be treated separately before a claim can be made.

Keywords

Citation

Laurence Fillion and Stacey Arazi (2002) "Does organic food taste better? A claim substantiation approach", Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 32 No. 4, pp. 153-157

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DOI

: https://doi.org/10.1108/00346650210436262

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2002, MCB UP Limited

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