Search results

1 – 10 of over 163000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Sonia Taneja, Mildred Golden Pryor and Mario Hayek

The purpose of this paper is to address the challenges faced by small businesses and to explain the importance of using strategic innovation to achieve long-term…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the challenges faced by small businesses and to explain the importance of using strategic innovation to achieve long-term sustainability and viability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study of small business innovation includes reviewing the types and determinants of innovation as well as strategies to overcome innovation barriers. In addition, the authors developed a model that portrays elements needed for strategic innovation that supports the long-term viability of small businesses.

Findings

Small businesses serve as the economic foundation for many nations because they stimulate innovation, provide jobs, foster competitiveness and support overall economic growth. Small businesses can rapidly adapt to change, adopt new strategies and provide flexibility that supports strategic innovation. As a result, strategic innovation is a key driver of sustainable competitive advantage for small businesses.

Practical implications

Small business leaders need to integrate strategic innovation with their strategic planning to remain competitive. The strategic innovation model presented in this paper can assist them in understanding elements needed for successful strategic innovation and long-term viability.

Social implications

Globally, small businesses exert a strong influence on economic growth and create opportunities, employment and technological development. This paper will assist small business leaders as they strive to use strategic innovation to strengthen their competitive capabilities.

Originality/value

The unique strategic innovation model that the authors developed can help small businesses to achieve long-term sustainability and viability in the competitive marketplace.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Sandy Hewitt

Discusses the way in which the business excellence model is being presented to small companies. Compares success of the model as a basis for self‐assessment in large…

Abstract

Discusses the way in which the business excellence model is being presented to small companies. Compares success of the model as a basis for self‐assessment in large organizations against lack of interest from the small business sector. Suggests reasons such as poor marketing, inappropriate self‐assessment tools and the fact that small businesses do not always accept the model’s underlying principles. Makes reference to research being carried out defining the needs of small businesses, and some of the questions which are as yet unanswered. Concludes that the bodies concerned with promoting business excellence have not yet put much effort into the small business sector, but that some progress is being made.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Alan Coetzer, Janice Redmond and Vern Bastian

The purpose of this paper is to make the case that owner-managers of small businesses should consider using strength-based coaching as a key element of their performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make the case that owner-managers of small businesses should consider using strength-based coaching as a key element of their performance management and learning and development endeavours because small businesses are potentially well-suited to this type of developmental intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

In making the case, we draw on literature primarily in four areas: performance management, positive psychology, strength-based management and small business management. The case for adopting strength-based coaching is also underpinned by the practical insights of an experienced small business manager.

Findings

The informal internal organisation found in most small businesses makes the small business context potentially well-suited to strength-based coaching. In particular, the informal characteristic of small businesses promotes close working relationships between owner-managers and employees and broadly defines work roles. Such a work context is conducive to strength-based coaching that involves owner-managers capitalising on the unique abilities of each employee by redefining work roles to fit employees’ strengths.

Practical implications

Using strength-based coaching to align employees’ strengths with the work of the small business should have positive effects on the key variables of individual and collective performance and ultimately business results. These variables of performance are employee ability, motivation and opportunity to perform.

Originality/value

After database searching, it seems that there is no previous work that has examined the potential efficacy of strength-based coaching in a small business context. The paper has value for small business managers who are seeking practical guidance on how to improve their current approaches to both managing employee performance and fostering the learning and development of the staff.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1984

Sue Birley and Allan Gibb

This is the second and final part of an article which considers the role of the UK education sector in small firms management, education and training. The first part…

Abstract

This is the second and final part of an article which considers the role of the UK education sector in small firms management, education and training. The first part reviewed the changing pressures on the higher education sector which provide opportunities for its greater involvement with the owner‐managed company. It also looked closely at the needs of the “customers” for small business training and discussed how these might be usefully segmented. We now discuss the contribution of the education sector along with the “supply side” problems. The data is drawn from a survey of 80 ex‐participants of the UK Small Business Management Teachers Programme. The survey was undertaken in 1982. The objectives of this programme and its importance in the field of the small business management were discussed in the first part.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Bob Gammie

Banks in the UK have received much adverse publicity over the lastfour years. Primarily, they have been accused of failing to passinterest‐rate reductions on to their small

Abstract

Banks in the UK have received much adverse publicity over the last four years. Primarily, they have been accused of failing to pass interest‐rate reductions on to their small business customers. This has resulted in the introduction of charters to specify more clearly the conditions of their relationship with their small business customers. Focuses on the impact of bank charters on this relationship and establishes that banks are now doing more to accommodate their small business customers. Small businesses have confidence in their account managers, but are not receptive to advice from this source. Recommends that they should be more amenable to advice and be more proactive in seeking consultation with senior bank representatives. Displeasure over charges can be alleviated through discussion and explanation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2017

Bharat Mehra, Bradley Wade Bishop and Robert P. Partee

This chapter presents a gap analysis of the perspectives of small businesses and rural librarians in Tennessee in order to develop an implementation blueprint of a public…

Abstract

This chapter presents a gap analysis of the perspectives of small businesses and rural librarians in Tennessee in order to develop an implementation blueprint of a public library small business toolkit, a resource that the state’s rural public libraries can create for small businesses in the future.

The chapter reports on select comparison data sets collected via two exploratory online surveys with small businesses and rural public librarians, respectively, in an externally funded planning grant awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ National Leadership Grants for Libraries (Research category) to the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee.

Findings from the gap analysis of the perspectives of small businesses and rural librarians provide similarities and differences between the two stakeholder groups in terms of

  • existing assistance needs of small businesses,

  • information-related challenges small businesses experience,

  • desired public library use, and

  • information-related components of a public library small business toolkit.

existing assistance needs of small businesses,

information-related challenges small businesses experience,

desired public library use, and

information-related components of a public library small business toolkit.

The study is a unique example of action research based on varied levels of participation in rural research and action, learning through collaboration, community inquiry into everyday experiences and potential impact, use of mixed methods, and the situated nature of applications and concrete outcomes. It serves as a pilot case experience and prototype assessment test bed to expand strategies for the entire Appalachian region and other rural environments in the future.

Details

Rural and Small Public Libraries: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-112-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reflections and Extensions on Key Papers of the First Twenty-Five Years of Advances
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-435-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Taxing the Hard-to-tax: Lessons from Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-828-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Alice M. Brawley Newlin

Small businesses are dominant in most economies and their owners likely experience high levels of distress. However, we have not fully explored how these common businesses

Abstract

Small businesses are dominant in most economies and their owners likely experience high levels of distress. However, we have not fully explored how these common businesses meaningfully differ with respect to the stress process. Understanding the meaningful variations or subgroups (i.e., heterogeneity) in the small business population will advance occupational health psychology, both in research and practice (e.g., Schonfeld, 2017; Stephan, 2018). To systematize these efforts, the author identifies five commonly appearing “heterogeneity factors” from the literature as modifiers of stressors or the stress process among small business owners. These five heterogeneity factors include: owner centrality, individual differences, gender differences, business/ownership type, and time. After synthesizing the research corresponding to each of these five factors, the author offers specific suggestions for identifying and incorporating relevant heterogeneity factors in future investigations of small business owners’ stress. The author closes by discussing implications for advancing occupational health theories.

Details

Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Kostas Selviaridis

The study aims to investigate how pre-commercial procurement (PCP) influences the activities, capabilities and behaviours of actors participating in the innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to investigate how pre-commercial procurement (PCP) influences the activities, capabilities and behaviours of actors participating in the innovation process. Unlike much of PCP research underpinned by a market failure theoretical framework that evaluates the additionality of innovation inputs and outputs, this paper focusses on the role and capacity of PCP in addressing systemic failures impeding the process of innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

PCP effects on the innovation process were studied through a qualitative study of the UK small business research initiative (SBRI) programme. Data collection comprised 33 semi-structured interviews with key informants within 30 organisations and analysis of 80-plus secondary data sources. Interviewees included executives of technology-based small businesses, managers within public buying organisations and innovation policymakers and experts.

Findings

The UK SBRI improves connectivity and instigates research and development (R&D) related interactions and cooperation. Through securing government R&D contracts, small firms access relevant innovation ecosystems, build up their knowledge and capabilities and explore possible routes to market. Public organisations use the SBRI to connect to innovative small firms and access their sets of expertise and novel ideas. They also learn to appreciate the strategic role of procurement. Nonetheless, SBRI-funded small business face commercialisation and innovation adoption challenges because of institutional constraints pertaining to rules, regulations and public-sector norms of conduct.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to existing PCP research by demonstrating innovation process-related effects of PCP policies. It also complements literature on small business-friendly public procurement measures by highlighting the ways through which PCP, rather than commercial procurement procedures, can support the development of small businesses other than just facilitating their access to government (R&D) contracts.

Social implications

The study identifies several challenge areas that policymakers should address to improve the implementation of the UK SBRI programme.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the effects of PCP on the activities, capabilities and behaviours of small businesses and public buying organisations involved in the innovation process.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 163000