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Article

Jens Ørding Hansen, Are Jensen and Nhien Nguyen

This study aims to investigate whether the learning organization, as envisioned by Peter Senge in The Fifth Discipline (1990), facilitates responsible innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether the learning organization, as envisioned by Peter Senge in The Fifth Discipline (1990), facilitates responsible innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the component characteristics of the learning organization as defined by Senge (1990) to identify any conceptual or causal connections to responsible research and innovation (RRI). To define RRI, the authors make use of a commonly cited framework from the academic literature that is consistent with the vision of RRI promoted in European Union policy.

Findings

The authors find significant complementarities between being a learning organization and practicing responsible innovation. Some of the practices and characteristics of a learning organization in the sense of Senge (1990) do not merely facilitate RRI, they are RRI by definition. One important caveat is that to qualify as a responsible innovator according to the proposed framework, an organization must involve external stakeholders in the innovation process, a requirement that has no parallel in The Fifth Discipline. The authors conclude that there is at most a small step from being a learning organization to becoming a responsibly innovating learning organization.

Originality/value

The authors propose a reconsideration of the scope of applicability of Senge’s theory, opening new possibilities for drawing inspiration from The Fifth Discipline 30 years after the book was first published. The authors conclude that there may be significant non-economic advantages to being a learning organization, and that The Fifth Discipline may be more valuable for its ethical perspectives on the organization than as a prescription for how to achieve business success.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article

Rita Vilkė, Živilė Gedminaitė-Raudonė and Dalia Vidickienė

This paper aims to examine the collaboration of livestock farming business with other three groups of actors and explore the gap between expectations and reality…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the collaboration of livestock farming business with other three groups of actors and explore the gap between expectations and reality concerning biogas production as collaborative innovation for the socially responsible development of rural regions in Lithuania.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the concept of the Quadruple Helix, which focusses on innovation, viewed as a process involving increasingly closer interactions and coordination among the following four groups of actors of the helix: government, academia, industry and civil society. Scientific literature analysis and generalization, expert interview and focus group methods were used to generate data for analysis. Data were collected during the period of July-November 2018 in Lithuania.

Findings

The research results reveal that the greatest gap among expectations and the actual situation in collaboration for socially responsible innovation, biogas production – is observed among non‐governmental organizations as representatives of civil society and all other questioned Quadruple Helix actors, whereas the government had been recognized as a most isolated part of the collaboration for innovation in biogas in Lithuania.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents empirical findings, based on qualitative data, collected in one EU new member state, i.e. Lithuania. International comparative perspectives are given in other related papers. Research findings are promising for further research in the field of socially responsible development of rural regions using the Quadruple Helix approach to foster collaboration for modern circular economy innovation both from theoretical and empirical points of view.

Practical implications

The methodology might be used for practitioners to research collaboration excellence/gaps in any field of activity.

Social implications

The research takes into account the public interest from a very broad point of view – how to develop rural regions in a socially responsible way by using already established innovations in biogas in livestock farms by giving another dimension of socially responsible collaboration for innovation.

Originality/value

The paper proposes using the original Quadruple Helix approach to foster the socially responsible development of rural regions, thus enlarging the scope of the theory of corporate social responsibility (CSR) with the newly emerged discourse in the field. Socially responsible development of rural regions with the use of collaboration for circular innovations has been absent from theoretical to empirical CSR research.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article

Christine Vallaster, Sascha Kraus, Norbert Kailer and Brooke Baldwin

The purpose of this paper is to give an up-to-date assessment of key topics and methods discussed in the current literature on responsible entrepreneurship. In the past…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an up-to-date assessment of key topics and methods discussed in the current literature on responsible entrepreneurship. In the past years, sustainable development itself has become a more popular and important topic in the academic literature and hence the field of sustainable entrepreneurship has become a greater topic of interest and opportunity for solution. Therefore, a systematic literature review is conducted to assess new contributions to the field and its potential for the future of sustainable development, with a focus on responsible innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic, evidence-informed literature review following Tranfield et al. (2003).

Findings

Based on a conceptual literature review, five streams of research that responsible entrepreneurs distinguish from purely for-profit entrepreneurs are identified and discussed: walking the line between profit creation and value creation for society; business models of responsible entrepreneurs; their role in transforming society; getting ready to innovate responsibly; and the role of market incentives to foster sustainable business practices.

Originality/value

The structured literature review allows to identify future research paths. In detail, ideas as regards the management of upcoming tensions when trying to combine profit creation and value creation for society, and finally, the way innovation processes need to be rethought when innovating responsibly are discussed and outlined.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

Margaret Armstrong, Guillaume Cornut, Stéphane Delacôte, Marc Lenglet, Yuval Millo, Fabian Muniesa, Alexandre Pointier and Yamina Tadjeddine

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the potentials offered by New Product Committees for the development of responsible innovation in the financial services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the potentials offered by New Product Committees for the development of responsible innovation in the financial services industry; and to provide grounds for policy recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of collective, interdisciplinary reflection and experience within the industry.

Findings

New Product Committees can serve a practical approach to responsible innovation in finance.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in the empirical consideration of New Product Committees in the financial services industry and proposes original directions for policy orientations within organizations and at a regulatory level.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article

Sarah Schoellhammer and Stephen Gibb

This paper aims to develop a model of collective innovation, with respect to innovation strategy, structure and culture in heterarchies. The enabling of collective…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a model of collective innovation, with respect to innovation strategy, structure and culture in heterarchies. The enabling of collective innovation in heterarchies is conceptualised as “responsible exposure”.

Design/methodology/approach

A study adopting cross-case analysis was undertaken with five organisations perceived to have heterarchical characteristics. These included one small company, two medium-sized companies and two larger companies, all were European. Data from semi-structured interviews, a survey of staff and other sources provide evidence of collective innovation practices.

Findings

The cross-case analysis suggests that the management of collective innovation is different from “classic” innovation management. It is more about enabling “responsible exposure” than the management of “shelter” for collective innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The strength of cross-case analysis and conceptual framework validation is limited by the cases being all from the European region.

Practical implications

What strategy, structure and culture for “responsible exposure” may mean can be described. Heterarchies will always be relatively rare, though lessons from how they enable collective innovation can be more widely learned. Lessons for the wider population of organisation that combine hierarchical and heterarchical characteristics and seek greater innovation are identified.

Social implications

Collective innovation, which requires “responsible exposure” has implications for the capabilities of managers and professionals concerned with innovation.

Originality/value

The cross-case analysis of innovation in heterarchies is original, leading to the description of a model of “responsible exposure” for collective innovation.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article

Arpita Agnihotri

This paper aims to explore various routes through firms can meet needs of the Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP) consumers in a socially responsible manner.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore various routes through firms can meet needs of the Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP) consumers in a socially responsible manner.

Design/methodology/approach

This is viewpoint paper based on evidences from archival sources.

Findings

The authors list possible and divergent answers to the following question: how to make innovations meaningful at BOP so that they can be acclaimed socially responsible for the BoP consumers.

Originality/value

Responsible innovation is yet unexplored part of business strategy especially in emerging markets. The authors throw light on this aspect.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

Emad Yaghmaei

Responsible research and innovation (RRI) is taking a role in assisting all types of stakeholders, including industry members, in moving their research and innovation

Abstract

Purpose

Responsible research and innovation (RRI) is taking a role in assisting all types of stakeholders, including industry members, in moving their research and innovation (R&I) initiatives to tackle grand challenges. The literature on RRI, however, focuses little on how industry can implement RRI principles. To solve this gap, the purpose of this study is to construct a conceptual framework for managing and assessing RRI principles in the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was used to build the RRI key performance indicator list; 30 interviews were conducted to design a framework which was pilot tested in a company to identify how to align technology outcomes to the values, needs and expectations of the society.

Findings

This study depicts five successive RRI implementation levels and exhibits RRI key performance indicators. Drawing on extant models, this study develops RRI levels and indicators to discuss why industry should become engaged in RRI, how it can embed RRI principles into R&I processes and how RRI indicators can be managed systematically.

Originality/value

The connection between RRI key performance indicators and RRI levels determines how industry can integrate principles and methodologies of RRI into R&I processes. The model in the study shows how companies move from one RRI stage to another and this study aims to exhibit an ideal stage of RRI for industry.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Article

Karsten Bolz and Anne de Bruin

Responsible innovation (RI) and social innovation (SI) are two fields of innovation study experiencing burgeoning policy, practice and research interest. Despite this…

Abstract

Purpose

Responsible innovation (RI) and social innovation (SI) are two fields of innovation study experiencing burgeoning policy, practice and research interest. Despite this rapid rise in popularity, the scholarly literature in these two related areas of innovation study remains quite separate, stymieing the growth of shared research insights. The purpose of this paper is to propose a pragmatic, process-based framework that lends itself to advancing systematic research in both fields while retaining their distinct identities.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper outlines an analogy-inspired framework that builds on the logical thinking put forward by Philosopher Willard Van Orman Quine in 1962. It focusses on key processes that cross-cut both fields.

Findings

Reflexivity, collaboration and design are identified as three broad core processes that span both the RI and SI fields and form the basis of an integrative framework that highlights the scope for cross-field research pollination.

Originality/value

The literature that draws these two fields together is virtually non-existent. The paper uses analogy to facilitate awareness of the parallels between these two areas of innovation study. The integrative framework put forward in the paper is of value for advancing cumulative research in innovation fields of critical importance to the society.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article

Angela Cottam, John Ensor and Christine Band

Describes the results of an empirical investigation of the FTSE 100 which was undertaken to ascertain whether UK industry is taking steps to address innovation at a…

Abstract

Describes the results of an empirical investigation of the FTSE 100 which was undertaken to ascertain whether UK industry is taking steps to address innovation at a strategic level within its organisations. In the research study, the appointment of staff with a specific responsibility for innovation was taken as an indicator of an organisation’s strategic commitment to innovation. The findings revealed that a significant minority of these organisations had invested in personnel with a specific brief for innovation. These were: directors of innovation; managers of innovation and cross‐functional teams. It is suggested that to maximise the benefits from innovation: it must be given a strategic direction; that relevant metrics be developed to measure the success of the innovation strategy; that organisations are educated on the holistic meaning of innovation; and finally, that there is a freedom from traditional hierarchical structures in the management of innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article

Bipul Kumar and Nikhilesh Dholakia

This study explores enablers that firms could use to motivate consumers toward responsible consumption behavior. Completing the loop of responsible consumption – linking…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores enablers that firms could use to motivate consumers toward responsible consumption behavior. Completing the loop of responsible consumption – linking firms and consumers –helps firms to attain responsible consumption targets as part of the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses netnography as the qualitative research methodology.

Findings

The important enablers of responsible consumption behavior are choice editing, design intervention, addressing consumers' environmental identity, brand assurance, promoting innovation mindset and consumer empowerment – at the level of consumers and at the crosslevel of interaction between firms and consumers. Such enablers can help the firms in nudging their consumers toward responsible consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Using the lens of the expectancy–value theory of achievement motivation, this study extends the theoretical domain of responsible consumption.

Practical implications

The enablers of responsible consumption behaviors found here serve as a useful guide for the strategies to attain the SDGs.

Social implications

The SDG goal 12 of responsible consumption is the focus of this study. The entire fabric of responsible consumption is woven around anthropocentric views, and hence the findings of this study have clear social implications.

Originality/value

This is a first study to explore how firms can facilitate consumers to consume responsibly, to attain the SDGs. This is also one of the first studies on responsible consumption, using netnography as the research methodology. Additionally, it also extends the applicability of the expectancy–value theory of achievement motivation to the context of responsible consumption behavior.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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