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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Eun Young Park and Jung Min Jang

The purpose of this paper demonstrate that purchase intention toward a cause-related marketing (CRM)-enhanced product can be positively correlated with consumers’ social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper demonstrate that purchase intention toward a cause-related marketing (CRM)-enhanced product can be positively correlated with consumers’ social responsibility consciousness (SRC) and can be increased or decreased merely by changing the evaluation mode.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct three experimental studies with two levels of SRC (high vs low) × two evaluation modes (joint evaluation (JE) vs separate evaluation (SE)) between-subjects design. The dependent variable is purchase intent toward the CRM-enhanced product.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers with high SRC are more likely than those with low SRC to purchase a CRM-enhanced product when two products are presented side by side (JE). However, consumers’ SRC level does not impact purchase intention when they see only one product (SE) independently (Study 1). The authors confirm that the proposed effect is mediated by perceived price fairness toward the product (Studies 2 and 3).

Research limitations/implications

Future research on CRM-enhanced products should carefully consider that the impact of individuals’ SRC level was in very different directions depending on the evaluation mode. In addition, further investigation is needed to address generalizability issues regarding samples and hypothetical stimuli.

Practical implications

These findings offer recommendations to help practitioners design effective marketing communications about CRM practice for target markets.

Originality/value

To the authors best knowledge, the current study is the first attempt to explore the crucial role of SRC, presentation mode and their interaction on purchase intention toward CRM-enhanced products.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2017

Hank C. Alewine and Dan N. Stone

The increasing use of complex, nonfinancial environmental performance measures in managerial decisions motivates consideration of contextual influences that potentially…

Abstract

The increasing use of complex, nonfinancial environmental performance measures in managerial decisions motivates consideration of contextual influences that potentially impact managerial judgments in environmental settings. This study extends general evaluability theory (GET: Hsee & Zhang, 2010) to environmental accounting by investigating the combined effects of evaluation mode and incomplete supplemental evaluability information (SEI; e.g., benchmark data) on management decisions. To elaborate, evaluation mode is the display format in which the accounting information system (AIS) provides available information for analysis; e.g., a manager’s or business unit’s performance is assessed either comparatively (i.e., in joint mode) or individually (i.e., in separate mode). GET suggests more decision weight on measures containing SEI in separate mode because that evaluation mode contains less context in which to analyze information. On the other hand, more decision weight should result for measures that do not contain SEI in joint mode because that mode already contains more context for analysis (e.g., comparing multiple performances with each other). To test these predictions, experimental participants (n = 53) evaluated environmental measures for factories with similar environmental performances. To operationalize the information available in many environmental AIS, some, but not all, performance measures contained benchmark data (incomplete SEI); factories were evaluated either jointly or separately. Participants evidenced decision intransitivity; i.e., in separate evaluation mode, factories rated higher when a favorable measure contained SEI, while in joint evaluation mode, factories rated higher when a favorable measure lacked SEI. The results extend previous AIS and management accounting research by investigating contextual influences, and potential systems design elements, in judgments using environmental AIS.

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Hank C. Alewine

The purpose of this paper is to survey the research methods employed in the extant environmental accounting literature, finding few experimental studies. The need for more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to survey the research methods employed in the extant environmental accounting literature, finding few experimental studies. The need for more experimentation in the literature is discussed, as well as how experiments' unique methodological advantages can help address important environmental accounting issues. These issues culminate in a proposed model for conducting experimental environmental accounting research.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of the environmental accounting literature emphasizes the research methods, and, advantages and disadvantages of each method, as well as why and how experimental designs can contribute to the environmental accounting literature. Finally, the paper proposes and analyzes a framework for conducting environmental accounting experiments.

Findings

Experiments can provide unique contributions to the environmental accounting literature. Relative to traditional accounting information, environmental accounting information comprises lower levels of user familiarity which may hinder effective processing of these non‐traditional data. These characteristics make the organizational display of these data, and their combination with non‐environmental metrics, a particular and unique concern. The proposed model considers the impact of environmental strategy on the implementation of environmental information systems, which in turn influences evaluation effectiveness of decisions based on environmental accounting information. Stakeholder influences, management communication of environmental issues, and evaluation scales also influence these relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The model assumes environmental information generates from within the entity (i.e. private firms, public agencies, etc.). Future research can enhance and/or modify the framework to include information design and capture from non‐entity end‐users (e.g. stakeholders), as well as empirically test the model's relationships.

Practical implications

The framework provides factors to consider to design more effective environmental accounting information systems. Also, the model's factors should aid researchers in developing robust experimental designs for environmental accounting studies.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to propose a framework for conducting experimental environmental accounting research.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Jill Sweeney, Robert W. Armstrong and Lester W. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to revisit our original paper published over 20 years ago and reflect on its purpose, contribution and what we can glean that might have…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit our original paper published over 20 years ago and reflect on its purpose, contribution and what we can glean that might have implications for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A Google Scholar search showed that the article was cited 74 times. We discuss some of the contexts in which it was cited and identify two research themes that have emanated from this paper and hold promise for future research.

Findings

We discuss two of the several contexts in which our research is discussed. These include the differential ways in which cues are used in a services context, including the ways in which different cues are used to evaluate services and how cues are used to develop consumer expectations.

Originality/value

The study, which was cited 74 times according to Google Scholar, was formative in terms of discussion of, for example, how a variety of cues influence customer expectations and service evaluation, and how categories of cues, such as marketer controlled versus non-marketer controlled and personal versus non-personal, impact outcomes. The retrospective analysis was helpful in both reflecting on the status quo on some of these issues and suggesting directions for future research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Po‐Young Chu, Chia‐Chi Chang, Chia‐Yi Chen and Tzu‐Yun Wang

As multinational firms seek to acquire competitive cost advantages through global sourcing, it is also important for them to develop effective strategies to reduce…

Abstract

Purpose

As multinational firms seek to acquire competitive cost advantages through global sourcing, it is also important for them to develop effective strategies to reduce possible damage of a negative country‐of‐origin (COO) effect. This study aims to examine whether brand image and evaluation mode could alleviate a negative COO effect.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2(COO)×2(brand)×2(evaluation mode) experimental design was employed in order to examine whether brand and COO effects on product evaluation vary under different evaluation modes. The data were analyzed by a repeated measure MANOVA.

Findings

The results showed that products made in favourable countries were rated higher in joint evaluation mode than in separate evaluation mode. Conversely, products made in unfavourable countries were better evaluated in separate evaluation mode than in joint evaluation mode. The results of the study are not in favour of the notion that a strong brand image could overcome the negative effect of COO.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions of the study suggest that the COO effect plays an equally important role in consumer product evaluation for both strong and weak brands. Thus, even for a product with strong brand image, the negative consequences of COO stemming from consumersˇ unfavourable attitudes towards the manufacturing country are not likely to be completely eliminated. Moreover, to alleviate the negative impact of unfavourable COO, marketers may want to avoid direct comparison between products made in unfavourable countries with those made in favourable countries, regardless of their brand strength.

Practical implications

When marketing a product made in an unfavourable country, marketers should manage to create a selling environment facilitating a separate evaluation mode. In contrast, marketers should proactively manage to display products from favourable countries along with those from unfavourable countries in order to further enhance quality perceptions.

Originality/value

The results of the study could help marketers employ advantageous merchandizing or advertising strategies to lessen the negative effect of COO.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Rania W. Semaan, Stephen Gould, Mike Chen-ho Chao and Andreas F. Grein

Country-of-origin (COO) effects on product evaluations have been widely applied in international marketing, albeit with mixed results. One stream of research values its…

Abstract

Purpose

Country-of-origin (COO) effects on product evaluations have been widely applied in international marketing, albeit with mixed results. One stream of research values its importance in decision-making, whereas another stream posits that COO has little effect when compared to the greater diagnosticity of other product attributes. This suggests that how and along what other attributes (extrinsic or intrinsic) COO is presented play an important role in its relative impact. The purpose of this paper is to address these mixed results by applying one such framing perspective based on evaluation mode (i.e. separate versus joint evaluation) and preference reversals and their biasing effects to a study of COO and willingness to pay (WTP) for a product.

Design/methodology/approach

A three between-subject (joint evaluation, separate evaluation-domestic and separate evaluation-foreign) experimental design was used to assess whether evaluation mode moderates COO effects on product evaluations.

Findings

Similar results are mirrored across three/four countries. When evaluated separately, consumers value an inferior domestic-made product more than a superior foreign-made one. However, when the domestic- and foreign-made products are presented in joint evaluations, the better foreign-made product is favored.

Research limitations/implications

A number of limitations in terms of countries, consumers within the countries and products studied are addressed along with future research that may address these factors and test the robustness of domestic–foreign preference reversals.

Practical implications

The results of this study reveal practical insights to marketers. Marketing managers for better-quality foreign brands are encouraged to engage in comparative advertising appeals and sell their products in retail stores that hold both domestic and foreign products, whereas marketers for domestic products should create a selling environment that facilitate only a separate evaluation mode to enhance WTP.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights on the diagnosticity of COO when presented alongside intrinsic attributes and the role of evaluation mode in shaping consumers’ preferences. This research suggests that COO has different effects in different evaluation modes, thus explaining some of the mixed results in literature regarding its importance. On the one hand, COO has a decisive effect on product evaluations when products are presented separately. On the other hand, COO effect is overridden by intrinsic cues, which become more apparent when products are presented jointly. Overall, these results demonstrate the robustness of the preference reversal effect across countries and products.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Tracey S. Dagger and Timothy K. O'Brien

Although customer relationships transpire through a process of time, encounters and experience, few studies have examined the dynamics of service relationships. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Although customer relationships transpire through a process of time, encounters and experience, few studies have examined the dynamics of service relationships. This paper aims to address this issue by examining the effect of experience on the association between relational benefits and relationship quality, and between relationship quality and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a national sample of 376 service consumers and nine service industries, the study examines whether the impact of relationship benefits on perceptions of satisfaction, trust and commitment, and ultimately customer loyalty, differs significantly between novice and experienced customer cohorts.

Findings

The results indicate significant differences between novice and experienced cohorts. Specifically, the impact of confidence, social and special treatment benefits on perceptions of satisfaction, trust and commitment, and ultimately customer loyalty, differ significantly based on a customer's level of relationship experience.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have tactical and strategic implications for service firms, including effective customer asset management, resource allocation, and relationship strategy.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant new contribution to theory and practice.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Nick Lee and Gordon Greenley

The purpose of this editorial is to bring together thoughts and opinions from the Editors and Senior Advisory Board of EJM regarding the nature of the long‐debated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to bring together thoughts and opinions from the Editors and Senior Advisory Board of EJM regarding the nature of the long‐debated “theory‐practice divide” in marketing scholarship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors synthesise diverse opinions from senior academics in order both to inspire further debate in marketing scholarship, and to draw some important conclusions for marketing academia as a whole.

Findings

The authors propose that, for marketing scholarship to mature and progress, room must be found for those who wish to focus both on practical and on pure marketing scholarship. Career advancement from both routes is vital.

Research limitations/implications

The topic of the theory‐practice gap is complex. Many diverse opinions are cited and, due to space constraints, the coverage of many issues is necessarily brief.

Practical implications

Scholars should find the thoughts contained in the paper of significant interest.

Originality/value

The paper appears to be the first to bring together such a set of diverse opinions on the subject, and to try to draw some overall pragmatic conclusions, while still recognising the multiplicity of valid thought in the area.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Salome Drechsler, Peter S.H. Leeflang, Tammo H.A. Bijmolt and Martin Natter

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of different multi-unit promotions (MUPs) and a single-unit promotion (SUP) on store-level sales and consumer-level…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of different multi-unit promotions (MUPs) and a single-unit promotion (SUP) on store-level sales and consumer-level purchase probability and quantity decision.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines two empirical studies. Study 1 applies a hierarchical multiplicative model to store-level sales data for four product categories provided by a large Dutch retail chain. Study 2 presents a laboratory experiment in which the quantity requirements of the two focal MUP frames are manipulated to assess their impact on consumer purchase decisions.

Findings

The paper provides empirical evidence for the superiority of the “X for $Y” above “X + N free”, which confirms the hypotheses based on prospect theory, mental accounting and theory about gift-giving. Quantity requirements of four to five units show the largest effects. In addition, the superiority of the “X for $Y” frame holds for functional product categories, but not for the hedonic categories.

Practical implications

The paper provides managerial insights into the relative effectiveness of alternative MUPs and an SUP and how this promotional effectiveness depends on the type of product category and quantity requirements.

Originality/value

This paper combines actual sales data and experimental data. This “mixed approach” extends existing knowledge by comprehensively evaluating two MUP frames, namely, “X + N free” and “X for $Y” promotions, and an SUP.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Shi‐Woei Lin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the range sensitivity of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and evaluate the effectiveness of using a bottom‐up approach to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the range sensitivity of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and evaluate the effectiveness of using a bottom‐up approach to mitigate the possible range insensitivity bias in the AHP.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted to test the normative range‐sensitivity of four different methods: the AHP with bottom‐up evaluation; direct ratio weights; swing weights; and trade‐off weights. Also, the significance of the range‐sensitivity effects and the differences among weighting approaches were rigorously tested using various statistical models.

Findings

Results show that the range sensitivities of AHP and direct ratio weights are significantly less than the range sensitivities of swing weights and tradeoff weights, suggesting that the bottom‐up evaluation approach might not be a feasible solution for the range‐insensitivity problem. This finding is consistent with the value‐comparison hypothesis proposed in an earlier study, and is partially supported by the theory of the multi‐dimensionality of attribute importance.

Research limitations/implications

It is concluded that treating the attribute weights and performance scoring scales separately in the AHP or other multi‐attribute decision analysis models might lead to an arbitrary final ranking of alternatives. Therefore, it may be necessary to incorporate better elicitation procedures into the AHP models to ensure that attribute weights properly reflect the range or scale of measurement.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence and issues words of warning of the range‐sensitivity effects in the multi‐attribute decision analysis.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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