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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2010

Koen H. Heimeriks and Melanie Schreiner

Building on the complementarity nature of extant dyadic and portfolio level alliance research, this paper discusses the role of alliance capability and relational quality…

Abstract

Building on the complementarity nature of extant dyadic and portfolio level alliance research, this paper discusses the role of alliance capability and relational quality as antecedents of alliance performance. Although prior research focused extensively on the influence of dyadic issues on alliance performance, more recent studies focus on firm-level capabilities to manage sets of alliances. We specify an integrated framework that merges these two previously separated streams of research and discuss how firm-level alliance capabilities affect dyadic level relational quality. The framework suggests that relational quality mediates between both alliance capability and alliance performance and provides a detailed discussion on how firm-level mechanisms improve the quality of dyadic relationships. We also discuss implications and options for future research.

Details

Enhancing Competences for Competitive Advantage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-877-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Colin C.J. Cheng and Eric C. Shiu

Despite the rising interest in eco-innovation, few studies have examined how open innovation (OI) actually increases eco-innovation performance. Drawing on capabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the rising interest in eco-innovation, few studies have examined how open innovation (OI) actually increases eco-innovation performance. Drawing on capabilities theory, this study aims to investigate how two specific organizational capabilities (alliance management capability and absorptive capacity) individually complement OI strategies (inbound and outbound) to increase eco-innovation performance, while taking into consideration high and low levels of environmental uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, the authors used a primary survey and secondary proxy data sources from 232 Taiwan-based manufacturing firms. The authors collected survey data for measuring OI strategies, followed by secondary proxy data for measuring alliance management capability, absorptive capacity, environmental uncertainty and eco-innovation performance.

Findings

The results indicate that in highly dynamic environments, alliance management capability complements inbound/outbound strategies to increase eco-innovation performance. However, absorptive capacity complements only inbound strategies, not outbound strategies.

Practical implications

These findings have important implications for managers attempting to increase eco-innovation performance by using OI in dynamic environments.

Social implications

The findings provide new evidence that configurations of OI alone are not enough for increasing eco-innovation performance. Instead, firms’ eco-innovation benefits more when OI are complemented by alliance management capability.

Originality/value

This study makes an original contribution to the eco-innovation literature by demonstrating how organizational capabilities complement OI to increase eco-innovation performance in dynamic environments.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Michael J. Gravier, Wesley S. Randall and David Strutton

The purpose of this paper is to show that following from the premise that knowledge comprises the fundamental source of competitive advantage, this study provides results

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that following from the premise that knowledge comprises the fundamental source of competitive advantage, this study provides results of a meta‐analysis that examines whether and how alliance performance is influenced by the role knowledge plays in a strategic alliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Meta‐analysis is employed as the driving methodology in this study. The meta‐analysis approach permits the literature on interfirm knowledge management to be reviewed and synthesized such that the role of knowledge in the alliance, environmental risk, and alliance performance can be thoroughly and validly investigated.

Findings

The findings suggest that the level of risk associated with the environment in which the alliance partners join forces does not moderate the relationship between the various “roles” of knowledge and alliance performance, whereas the magnitude and type of interfirm cohesiveness enjoyed or endured by the alliance participants does materially impact alliance performance. These performance differences suggest that – when the subject is alliance performance – knowledge management strategies matter more than environmental factors.

Research implications/limitations

The environmental uncertainty construct proved the biggest surprise, given conventional views that alliances should prove more effective in turbulent environments. However, implications are limited by observations that suggest the current alliance literature lacks well‐developed and corroborated knowledge and performance constructs. This, in turn, implies researchers should systematically assess the validity of extant knowledge and performance measures.

Practical implications

The observed positive relationship between increased levels of knowledge interchange, alliance cohesion, and alliance performance is a materially practical implication. This was especially true within industries that are inherently more dependent on vertical supplier or buyer relationships, such as manufacturing and services. Active interfirm knowledge management appears to contribute more to alliance performance than environmental factors.

Originality/value

This paper describes the first study to meta‐analyze the role and influence of knowledge constructs within the alliance literature. As such, the results empirically confirm some presumed conventional wisdoms while calling others into question.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Huijie Gao, Jianhua Yang, Huanwu Yin and ZhiChao Ma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate significant impact of partner similarity on the success of horizontal alliances in logistics service providers (LSPs) from China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate significant impact of partner similarity on the success of horizontal alliances in logistics service providers (LSPs) from China.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected via questionnaire distribution to 380 Chief Executive Officers and Managing Directors in 262 small and medium logistics enterprises in China. There are 316 valid questionnaires for further analysis with 83 percent accuracy in response rate. Structural equation modeling was used to test the impact of partner similarity on alliance management capability, stability and performance.

Findings

Partner similarity and logistics alliance management capability (LAMC) are positively correlated to alliance stability and performance in horizontal alliances among Chinese LSPs, especially competence similarity and cultural similarity. Moreover, alliance stability mediates the impact of partner similarity and LAMC on alliance performance.

Research limitations/implications

The basic limitation of this research is to collect data just from small and medium logistics enterprises that operate in China with sample size (n=316). This research could further be extended to other regions in China or other countries.

Practical implications

This research verifies the positive relationship between partner fit and management capability. Besides, based on research findings, the research proposes guidelines for LSPs pursuing horizontal alliances

Originality/value

This research proposes an experimental model for Chinese LSPs to cooperate successfully and build horizontal alliances in order to increase their effective customer response capability.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Dave Luvison and Ard-Pieter de Man

Extant literature has looked at the effect of alliance capability and organizational culture on alliance portfolio performance, but the relationship between the two has…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant literature has looked at the effect of alliance capability and organizational culture on alliance portfolio performance, but the relationship between the two has not been explored. The purpose of this paper is to explore the hypothesis that an alliance supportive culture is not only fostered by a firm’s alliance capabilities, but that it mediates the relationship between capabilities and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from 190 alliance managers, collected using a two-stage process, were analyzed to investigate the interrelationship of firm-level alliance capability, alliance supportive culture and portfolio performance.

Findings

Alliance supportive culture was found to mediate the relationship between alliance capability and alliance portfolio performance. This finding suggests that in order to effectively manage a firm’s portfolio of alliances, the benefits of alliance capability must be transferred broadly into the organization’s cultural orientation toward alliances.

Research limitations/implications

Further research may extend this analysis to explore the effect of subcomponents of alliance capability and alliance culture to better understand fine-grained influences on alliance performance. The findings of this study also may be extended to inform how supportive culture orientation affects partner selection, negotiation and time to performance.

Practical implications

Managers should utilize culture-building actions as a way of extending the value of their firms’ alliance capabilities in order to improve their effectiveness across the portfolio.

Originality/value

Extant studies have considered the discrete effects of capability and cultural orientation on alliance portfolio success, but the mediation effect has not previously been investigated. The findings also identify a boundary condition for the benefit of alliance capabilities on portfolio performance.

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Seongho Kang, Won-Moo Hur and Minsung Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the validity of the already suggested positive relationship between marketing alliance orientation and market performance in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the validity of the already suggested positive relationship between marketing alliance orientation and market performance in a service context, and to investigate the mediating role of alliance marketing program creativity (AMPC) in the relationship in detail.

Design/methodology/approach

To empirically test the hypotheses, a mail survey was conducted among firms with experience of service alliances in South Korea. A 725 research sample was selected (128 responded) from a database compiled by the Korea Investors Service-Financial Analysis System which provides comprehensive corporate and financial information on firms listed on the Korea Stock Exchange. partial least squares analysis was performed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Alliance orientation positively associated with market performance (H1), alliance orientation had a significantly positive effect on alliance marketing program meaningfulness and novelty (H2), and in turn, alliance marketing program meaningfulness and novelty had a significantly positive effect on market performance (H3). In terms of the determination of mediation type, full, or partial, the authors confirmed that the relationship between alliance orientation and market performance was fully mediated by AMPC (novelty and meaningfulness), by finding that the significantly reduced direct effect from alliance orientation to market performance in the mediation model.

Research limitations/implications

Alliance marketing program meaningfulness and novelty perform the role of full mediators, implying that the meaningfulness, and novelty of AMPC are absolutely indispensable conditions in order for alliance orientation to lead market performance. Moreover, different from the previous studies, the research suggests that alliance marketing program meaningfulness and novelty are equally important antecedents of market performance.

Originality/value

The positive relationship between alliance orientation and market performance in the service context was empirically tested, and the full mediating role of AMPC was confirmed. The importance of AMPC in the service context is highlighted.

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Rohit Prabhudesai and Ch. V.V.S.N.V. Prasad

The purpose of this study is to classify and analyze the impact of antecedents studied in the extant literature on two levels of SME alliance performancealliance-level…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to classify and analyze the impact of antecedents studied in the extant literature on two levels of SME alliance performancealliance-level and firm-level.

Design/methodology/approach

Using online databases and the bibliography section of the selected articles, 45 peer-reviewed studies specifically analyzing the impact of antecedents on the performance of SME alliances at the two levels were studied to gain insights.

Findings

The study differentiates between the impact of antecedents on the two levels of SME alliance performance, alliance-level and firm-level, and finds that certain antecedents, such as absorptive capacity, corporate entrepreneurship, control, network dimensions, partner opportunism and partner reputation, have a peculiar impact on a single level while other antecedents such as trust, commitment and cooperation, have an influence on performance at both levels. Also, the impact of these antecedents is hypothesized to be weak or strong, depending upon the results obtained by the papers in the review.

Research limitations/implications

In a first-of-its-kind approach, the paper provides a conceptual insight into the differentiating impact of antecedents on SME alliance performance at both levels, as opposed to the unitary analysis approach used in the extant literature. The model provided by the study can be used by researchers to gain a systematic understanding of how alliance outcomes are affected.

Practical implications

While the extant literature remains largely ambiguous on the role of antecedents causing variance in SME alliance outcomes, this paper serves to bridge this gap and enhance the understanding of practitioners by systematically analyzing how specific antecedents affect SME alliance performance at both levels.

Originality/value

As opposed to the unitary approach used in the extant literature, which does not differentiate between the two levels of SME alliance performance, this paper arranges and categorizes these studies based on the level at which alliance performance has been analyzed. Furthermore, the paper identifies the impact of antecedents at each level, thereby providing pioneering insights on understanding SME alliance outcomes.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Robert Van de Graaff Randolph

The purpose of this paper is to develop the concept of a high performance alliance macro-culture as a multilevel construct reflective of resilient collaborative systems of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the concept of a high performance alliance macro-culture as a multilevel construct reflective of resilient collaborative systems of exchange within strategic alliances and explores the distinct capabilities of this multilevel approach in predicting alliance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses developed in this study are tested using primary data collected from 650 members of 15 non-profit organizations in two multi-organizational collaborative networks. Considering the multilevel nature of the study the structural hypotheses are tested using a multilevel confirmatory factor analysis and the predictive hypotheses are tested using multilevel structural equation modeling.

Findings

All but one structural hypothesis are supported and all predictive hypotheses are supported suggesting that a multilevel macro-cultural conceptualization is effective in exploring the relationship between collaborative exchange systems and their outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations stem from the generalizability of the data collected as the alliances formed by non-profit firms may not be wholly reflective of the alliance structures and goals of other firm types.

Originality/value

This study primarily contributes to multilevel study of strategic alliances and the study of collaborative norms and structures of allied groupings. The results of this study lend support to the importance of taking a network governance perspective and illustrate the limitations of traditional single-level approaches when studying interfirm collaborative networks and structural resilience therein.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Aleksey Martynov

The purpose of this paper is to fill the theoretical void in the discussion of effects of alliance portfolios on firm performance by studying the moderating role of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to fill the theoretical void in the discussion of effects of alliance portfolios on firm performance by studying the moderating role of a firm’s strategic positioning.

Design/methodology/approach

A fixed effects, autoregressive panel model on a comprehensive, longitudinal sample of large and medium-sized publicly traded companies in the USA.

Findings

The effect of alliance portfolios on firm performance is conditional on the firm’s strategic positioning.

Research limitations/implications

The results may not be applicable to firms outside the USA or small firms.

Practical implications

Executives should craft their alliance portfolios while considering the strategic positioning of their firms.

Originality/value

This paper presents the first study of alliance portfolios that uses a comprehensive, multi-industry sample while considering firms’ strategic positioning. The paper is the first to jointly study characteristics of alliance portfolios and firm strategies.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Ning Li and William Hoggan Murphy

This paper aims to examine the effect of increases in alliance portfolio cultural diversity (IAPCD) on a firm’s performance and how portfolio configuration characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of increases in alliance portfolio cultural diversity (IAPCD) on a firm’s performance and how portfolio configuration characteristics moderate this effect, aiming to enable managers to make better partner choice and portfolio configuration decisions to improve performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes 2,326 focal firms from 93 countries that formed 7,616 alliances between the years 1992 and 2006. This study uses generalized method of moments estimation to examine the effects of portfolio changes on next year’s firm sales performance.

Findings

Results reveal an inverted-U relationship between IAPCD and firm performance. Data limitations led to examining moderating effects only on the upslope portion of the inverted-U, indicating that an increasing percentage of joint ventures in a firm’s alliance portfolio strengthens IAPCD’s contribution to performance. Further, increased numbers of marketing alliances or research and development alliances and increased percentage of horizontal alliances in an alliance portfolio have a negative moderating effect.

Research limitations/implications

The sample mostly covers large companies. The data indicate that nearly all firms are on the upslope of an inverted-U IAPCD–to–performance relationship, allowing testing of moderating effects pre-inflection point only.

Practical implications

Firms can leverage the additions of culturally diverse partners toward improved performance through astute configuration decisions in alliance portfolio composition.

Originality/value

This paper uses the knowledge-based view to contribute to the alliance portfolio literature. This study asserts that capacity constraints affect firms’ ability to realize performance gains when taking on culturally diverse partners, an effect moderated by portfolio configurations. This paper tests hypothesis with longitudinal data.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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