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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Bendik Bygstad and Gjermund Lanestedt

The paper aims to add knowledge on the status of the welfare technology field. Politicians in mature economies expect welfare technologies – especially digital technologies

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to add knowledge on the status of the welfare technology field. Politicians in mature economies expect welfare technologies – especially digital technologies – to contribute to bridging the gap between an increasing number of elderly and a shrinking work force. Theoretically, the paper deals with welfare technologies in a digital infrastructure perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A multilevel and comparative study was conducted to understand the interplay of high-level policies and implementation projects and highlight key issues through comparative analysis of different national approaches. Japan and Norway were the chosen countries because they are both in the forefront in the use of welfare technologies.

Findings

Findings reveal similarities between the two countries, which are echoed in many other countries: although government expectations are high, the field of welfare technology is still in its infancy and only rather simple solutions (such as safety alarms) are widely used. Key differences in innovation strategies for welfare technology in the two countries are highlighted, where Japan seem to be aiming for a vertical integration through large corporations’ solutions, whereas Norway aims for a more open innovation arena through standardization.

Originality/value

From a practical point of view, the two countries have something to learn from each other, but, in particular, both countries are recommended – together with other similar countries – a more platform-oriented approach. Theoretically, it is shown that a successful implementation of welfare technologies should adopt a digital infrastructure approach and exploit the generative mechanisms of this approach.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

On‐Kwok Lai

The question of how to enable disabled and disadvantaged people viainformation technology (IT) represents one of the challenges facing mostdeveloping countries in the…

Abstract

The question of how to enable disabled and disadvantaged people via information technology (IT) represents one of the challenges facing most developing countries in the coming decade. Examines the feasibility of, and argues for, an approach to health and welfare promotion centred on the enabling potential of IT. Describes the contextual specificity of the Asian (which is a highly differentiated) experience in state welfare and health provision. Based on some comparative findings and projected scenarios in East Asian countries, explores the challenge and opportunity for IT in this enabling process. The IT‐based promotional strategies are outlined and discussed; it is argued that the effectiveness of IT applications in this process is contingent on the variables embedded in the technology‐‐the risks associated with technological development as well as the underlying socio‐political structure. Ends with remarks on the role of IT in global welfare and health promotion in the 1990s.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Abstract

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Agricultural Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-481-3

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 2012

Seth Freedman

Purpose – This chapter discusses the relationship between health insurance and hospitals’ decisions to adopt medical technologies. I focus on both how the extent of…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter discusses the relationship between health insurance and hospitals’ decisions to adopt medical technologies. I focus on both how the extent of insurance coverage can increase incentives to adopt new treatments, and how the parameters of the insurance contract can impact the types of treatments adopted.

Methodology/approach – I provide a review of the previous theoretical and empirical literature and highlight evidence on this relationship from previous expansions of Medicaid eligibility to low-income pregnant women.

Findings – While health insurance has important effects on individual-level choices of health care consumption, increases in the fraction of the population covered by insurance has also been found to have broader supply side effects as hospitals respond to changes in demand by changing the type of care offered. Furthermore, hospitals respond to the design of insurance contracts and adopt more or less cost-effective technologies depending on the incentive system.

Research limitations/implications – Understanding how insurance changes supply side incentives is important as we consider future changes in the insurance landscape.

Originality/value of paper – With these previous findings in mind, I conclude with a discussion of how the Affordable Care Act may alter hospital technology adoption incentives by both expanding coverage and changing payment schemes.

Details

The Economics of Medical Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-129-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Shokoofeh Fazel

The real impact of advances in technology on global welfare is an unresolved issue. According to a recent Human Development Report, globalization based on technical…

Abstract

The real impact of advances in technology on global welfare is an unresolved issue. According to a recent Human Development Report, globalization based on technical advances in information technology has not had a positive impact on economies of developing countries. While advances in technology have helped improve standards of living in industrialized countries, they have caused developing countries to further lag behind. Some other studies, however, have concluded that investment in technology is a critical factor in improving economic welfare of all countries. It is important to note that most of the empirical studies in the latter group have treated technology investment as an independent variable explaining growth in economic welfare. In this paper, we argue against the notion that investment technology is an independent variable explaining welfare in developing countries. In section one, we present logical reasons why technology in itself fails to create better standards of living in developing countries. In section two, we will use a cross sectional simple regression model to test the relationship between advances in technology and economic welfare in developing countries. The results of our empirical study confirm our arguments of section one that global technological advances have not helped the economies of developing countries.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2014

Lennart Magnusson, Lars Sandman, Karl Gustav Rosén and Elizabeth Hanson

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the complexity surrounding the implementation of advanced electronic tracking, communication and emergency response technologies

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the complexity surrounding the implementation of advanced electronic tracking, communication and emergency response technologies, namely, an extended safety and support (ESS) system for people with dementia (pwd) living at home. Results are presented from a Swedish demonstration study (2011-2012) conducted in 24 municipalities.

Design/methodology/approach

It is a descriptive intervention study with a pre-post test design. Questionnaires were administered to pwd, carers and professionals at the outset and eight months later. ESS logging data were analyzed.

Findings

ESS usage rates varied widely. A total of 650 alerts were triggered, mainly when the pwd was outdoors. Activities were reduced amongst pwd, most likely due to a progression of their disease. Carers noted that pwd were more independent than previously on those occasions when they engaged in outdoor activities. Staff considered that nearly half of pwd could remain living at home due to the ESS, compared with a third amongst carers. In total, 50 per cent of carers felt it was justified to equip their relative with an ESS without their explicit consent, compared to one in eight staff.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation is the amount of missing data and high drop- out rates. Researchers should recruit pwd earlier in their illness trajectory. A mixed-methods approach to data collection is advisable.

Practical implications

Carers played a crucial role in the adoption of ESS. Staff training/supervision about assistive devices and services is recommended.

Social implications

Overall, use of ESS for pwd living at home was not an ethical problem.

Originality/value

The study included key stakeholder groups and a detailed ethical analysis was conducted.

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Jongkuk Lee and William J. Qualls

The objective of this paper is to propose a process through which channel stakeholders interact with one another to adopt a buyer‐seller technology with the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to propose a process through which channel stakeholders interact with one another to adopt a buyer‐seller technology with the purpose of improving the efficiency of their supply chain. The paper seeks to examine how ongoing business relationships between channel stakeholders influence the process of buyer‐seller technology adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper extends the technology acceptance model (TAM) to dyadic adoption behaviour by incorporating a social network perspective for buyer‐seller relationships.

Findings

Buyer‐seller technology adoption occurs at multiple levels throughout a supply chain network. Although each channel stakeholder forms its own behavioural intention to adopt a new enterprise technology, actual adoption occurs at the dyadic level between two channel stakeholders. Network embeddedness and resource dependence can influence the individual firm and dyadic processes of buyer‐seller technology adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study imply that successful implementation of a buyer‐seller technology requires attention to the relationships between channel stakeholders as well as each channel stakeholder's internal needs and capability of adopting the technology.

Originality/value

The paper offers a social network perspective of buyer‐seller behaviour when adopting a new technology. The model provides a framework through which the impact of internal and relational factors on technology adoption behaviour can be examined systematically at the dyadic level of supply chain relationships.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Niels Christian Mossfeldt Nickelsen and Bente Elkjaer

Telecare is a growing practice defined as diagnosis, treatment and monitoring among doctors, nurses and patients, which is mediated through ICT and without face-to-face…

Abstract

Purpose

Telecare is a growing practice defined as diagnosis, treatment and monitoring among doctors, nurses and patients, which is mediated through ICT and without face-to-face interaction. The purpose of this study is to provide empirically based knowledge about the organization of the use of ICT and dilemmas of this increasingly common practice in healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on observations, interviews and desk research in relation to a large €4.5m pilot project at four hospitals in Copenhagen regarding care of 120 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD). The empirical study was carried out over four months. Online video consultations were observed alongside workshops focusing on nurses’ photo elucidation of the telecare practice. The analytical ambition was to start the study in the middle of things and explore the emergent design of telecare.

Findings

Telecare not only embraces new standards and possibilities for professional responsibility and accountability for nurses but also alters the relationship between doctors and nurses. This leads to a dilemma we characterize as “paradoxical accountability”.

Originality/value

The study draws on Star’s notion of “infrastructure”. In this perspective, infrastructure comprises human and non-human conduct embedded in organizational conventions, relations and sites. The analysis demonstrates that nurses are not only exposed to a new responsibility as all-round case managers but they also have less access to clinical decision makers. The notion of “paradoxical accountability” is developed to account for this dilemma.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 15 February 2019

The RBNZ’s no-change stance reflects major world central banks’ recent retreat from tightening. While current New Zealand economic growth is firm, the RBNZ and the…

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Nicole Thualagant and Ditte-Marie From

Technologies of measurement and self-monitoring of health data have become part of a metric everyday life in Denmark. As part of a change in Nordic Welfare society, Danish…

Abstract

Technologies of measurement and self-monitoring of health data have become part of a metric everyday life in Denmark. As part of a change in Nordic Welfare society, Danish citizens are increasingly experiencing a digitisation of welfare services. This chapter explores the rationales behind the eGovernment strategy of Digital Welfare 2016–2020 in regard to health and discusses how this strategy encourages self-measurement and self-improvement through discourses of improvement at both state and citizen levels. By illustrating how performativity is embedded in current conceptions of health, this chapter emphasises how strategies of digitisation lean on a bio-citizenship where individuals with poor health capacities become dependent, not on a supporting welfare system, but paradoxically on their own self-management skills in order to receive health services. Based on the sociology of knowledge approach to discourse (SKAD) analysis, this chapter scrutinises central documents on the strategy of digital welfare. Our exploration provides a critical insight into the current digitisation of health care by illustrating how new virtues of citizenship are demanded in the digital era in relation to digital health, and furthermore represents a current challenge for Danish welfare in the schism between technology as empowering and a technocratic form of governance.

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