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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Wayne P. Kelley

The United Stales Government Printing Office (GPO) intends to transform itself from an ink on paper printer to a multimedia disseminator of government information products…

Abstract

The United Stales Government Printing Office (GPO) intends to transform itself from an ink on paper printer to a multimedia disseminator of government information products and services. Although the existing federal information policy system is confused and at times contradictory, the GPO has statutory responsibilities to insure the public's access to government information. The approaches, underlying principles, and strategies upon which the GPO will rely for the forthcoming years to transform itself are described. An essential ingredient for successful dissemination of government electronic information will be cooperation among the various stakeholder groups concerned with access to government information.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Joan Lippincott

The Spring 1992 Meeting of the Coalition Task Force took place on 24–25 March 1992 in Washington, DC. Over 350 individuals from over 200 institutions and organizations…

Abstract

The Spring 1992 Meeting of the Coalition Task Force took place on 24–25 March 1992 in Washington, DC. Over 350 individuals from over 200 institutions and organizations attended. A total of 159 institutions and organizations now belong to the Coalition Task Force, and 87% of them were represented at this Meeting. Ten institutions and organizations attended this meeting as new members of the Task Force and seven individuals travelled from outside North America to attend.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Thomas Kelley, Anthony Kessel, Rosalyn Collings, Brian Rubenstein, Charlotte Monnickendam and Andrew Solomon

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a preliminary study based on a novel structured mental health education programme – Innate Health Education and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a preliminary study based on a novel structured mental health education programme – Innate Health Education and Resilience Training (iHEART) – in a cohort of secondary school adolescents in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A curriculum-based ten-week programme was delivered by trained facilitators. In total, 205 students enrolled in the study. An additional 64 participants were within an age-matched non-intervention control group. A non-randomised control mixed methodology approach was used. All students, pre- and post-programme, completed a quantitative questionnaire – the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Survey. Qualitative measures were used to assess participants’ perceptions of changes in their resilience and mental well-being.

Findings

Those who received the intervention showed a small improvement in mental well-being relative to those who did not, with a similar change in resilience. Qualitative findings regarding impulse control and emotional resilience provided positive findings.

Originality/value

iHEART may be a promising new intervention offering a step change in mental health education for improving resilience, mental well-being and the ability for participants to navigate psychological challenges.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Anthony C. Klotz and Ryan D. Zimmerman

Although a significant body of work has amassed that explores the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of employee turnover in organizations, little is known about…

Abstract

Although a significant body of work has amassed that explores the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of employee turnover in organizations, little is known about how employees go about quitting once they have made the decision to leave. That is, after the decision to voluntarily quit their job is made, employees must then navigate through the process of planning for their exit, announcing their resignation, and potentially working at their company for weeks after their plans to resign have been made public. Our lack of understanding of the resignation process is important as how employees quit their jobs has the potential to impact the performance and turnover intentions of other organizational members, as well as to harm or benefit the reputation of the organization, overall. Moreover, voluntary turnover is likely to increase in the coming decades. In this chapter, we unpack the resignation process. Specifically, drawing from the communication literature and prior work on employee socialization, we develop a three-stage model of the resignation process that captures the activities and decisions employees face as they quit their jobs, and how individual differences may influence how they behave in each of these three stages. In doing so, we develop a foundation upon which researchers can begin to build a better understanding of what employees go through after they have decided to quit but before they have exited their organization for the final time.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Steve Sizoo, Richard Plank, Wilfried Iskat and Hendrick Serrie

The significant increase in service offerings throughout the world has caused marketing scholars to focus their attention on the characteristics of the service encounter…

Abstract

Purpose

The significant increase in service offerings throughout the world has caused marketing scholars to focus their attention on the characteristics of the service encounter. With the growth in global business, more attention is also being paid to cross‐culture service encounters. This study proposes adding to that trend by attempting to measure the effect of intercultural sensitivity on the cross‐cultural performance of service employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were carried out in four‐ and five‐diamond hotels located in the state of Florida with reputations for attracting foreign guests.

Findings

The results indicate that employees with high intercultural sensitivity scored significantly (p<0.05) higher than employees with low intercultural sensitivity in terms of service attentiveness, revenue contribution, interpersonal skills, job satisfaction, and social satisfaction as they relate to cross‐cultural encounters. There was no significant difference in scores for motivation‐to‐work and perceptions of primary rewards (compensation, recognition, etc.).

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to upscale in Florida hotels.

Originality/value

Results suggest that service firms would benefit from testing for and providing training in intercultural sensitivity for employees involved in cross‐cultural service encounters.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Wayne Tervo, L. Murphy Smith and Marshall Pitman

This study examines the influence of firm management’s ethical “tone at the top” (tone) and the working relationship of an auditor with his/her supervisor (senior) on the…

Abstract

This study examines the influence of firm management’s ethical “tone at the top” (tone) and the working relationship of an auditor with his/her supervisor (senior) on the auditor’s propensity to engage in an unethical, dysfunctional auditor behavior (DAB). Findings indicate that environmental factors influence the staff auditor’s decision of whether or not to follow a course of action suggested by the supervisor that is contrary to both the audit program and generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS). Specifically, auditors are influenced by the tone that the partner sets for the firm and by the working relationship that the staff auditor has with the supervising senior auditor. The results of this research have ramifications for the auditing profession, as they identify specific factors outside of auditing standards and beyond an auditor’s moral reasoning capabilities that can influence the acceptance of unethical, dysfunctional behavior.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-845-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

James H. Dulebohn, Brian Murray and Gerald R. Ferris

Interest in the nature of influence attempts in the performance evaluation process has increased in recent years. Researchers have conducted a number of important and…

Abstract

Interest in the nature of influence attempts in the performance evaluation process has increased in recent years. Researchers have conducted a number of important and revealing cross‐sectional investigations, but there remains virtually no longitudinal work in this area. The present study attempted to address this need by conducting a multi‐period investigation of influence tactics use and affect that addressed three questions: (1) Are individuals consistent in their use of influence tactics across evaluation periods? (2) Are prior‐period performance ratings reflected in subsequent influence tactic use? (3) What role does affect, both supervisor and subordinate, play in this process? A latent variable structural model was tested using longitudinal data from managers and employees of food services units. Our results indicated that there is a cycle of continued influence tactic use across time periods, performance ratings help to determine subsequent tactic use, and both supervisor and subordinate affect play a role in the influence‐evaluation process. Implications of these results and directions for future research are discussed.

Details

Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Thomas M. Kelley

To assess the mental health of members of the police force and expose any gaps existing at what should be its ideal level, with reference to aspiring policemen of the…

Abstract

Purpose

To assess the mental health of members of the police force and expose any gaps existing at what should be its ideal level, with reference to aspiring policemen of the future. Aims to explain the health realization model and give a definition of optimal mental health with specific reference to the police force.

Design/methodology/approach

Employs the well‐being inventory, a survey investment designed specifically to measure five dimensions of optimal mental health, to assess the mental condition of 179 prospective police professionals.

Findings

The results of the survey appear to suggest that future job satisfaction for many prospective police professionals in the study could be less than optimal, with the implication that high notes of mental dysfunction in its various forms could be experienced.

Practical implications

It is imperative that sound mental health instruction be incorporated into all future police training programs. However, further research needs to be done in order to advance a process which is at present only experimental.

Originality/value

Emphasizes the value of teaching future police officers the nature and source of optimal psychological functioning.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part
Publication date: 2 June 2015

Matthew R. Leon and Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben

One particular egregious type of workplace mistreatment is supervisor abuse, which has received extensive attention due to its heavy cost to organizations including up to…

Abstract

One particular egregious type of workplace mistreatment is supervisor abuse, which has received extensive attention due to its heavy cost to organizations including up to 23 billion dollars in annual loss resulting from increases in absenteeism, health care costs, and productivity loss. Employees attribute causes to abusive supervision, and these attributions impact subsequent reactions. In some cases, employees may feel that abusive supervision is justified, leading to the reaction of Schadenfreude, or pleasure in another’s pain. In this chapter, we discuss antecedents to Schadenfreude, its role in observed mistreatment, and propose a conceptual model based on attribution theory.

Details

Mistreatment in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-117-0

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