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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Francisco Coronado, Vincent Charles and Rocky J. Dwyer

The purpose of this paper is to incorporate factors that characterize the agricultural activity as productivity indices to compute the agricultural competitiveness of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to incorporate factors that characterize the agricultural activity as productivity indices to compute the agricultural competitiveness of regions in order to rank the regions, and compare the results with those obtained by applying other commonly used social and economic indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify regional factors related to the use of water, soil, production, revenues, and rural population, which conform a total of six productivity indices, that the authors then employ to calculate the regional agricultural competitiveness index.

Findings

The agricultural-related indices are informative in supporting the regional ranking related to resources and technology utilization. The results reveal that the coastal regions are the most competitive when compared to the regions located in the highlands and the jungle. Nevertheless, in contrast with other existing competitiveness rankings, the present study identifies the regions with the greatest potential for agriculture.

Research limitations/implications

The authors identify the regions which have a higher potential of development considering the natural resources and agricultural production. The authors hope that this paper can assist regional and national policymakers in their endeavor to improve regional and national competitiveness.

Practical implications

The authors identify the regions with a higher potential of development considering natural resources and agricultural production and the possibilities to improve their competitiveness.

Social implications

The study also bears social implications, given that the rural activities in Peru are carried out by approx. 7 million inhabitants, whose contribution to the gross domestic product (GDP) is as much as 7 percent, making use of about 94 percent of the available water.

Originality/value

The originality of the present paper resides in the attempt to compute a regional competitiveness index by taking agricultural resources as determinant factors. The authors rank the regions based on their agricultural competitiveness.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Vincent Charles and Tomonari Sei

Regional competitiveness refers to the capacity of a region to manage its resources and competencies to increase the well-being of its people. Measuring regional…

Abstract

Purpose

Regional competitiveness refers to the capacity of a region to manage its resources and competencies to increase the well-being of its people. Measuring regional competitiveness is, thus, a major consideration for policymakers, businesses and the academic community in their endeavour to improve the same. This paper aims to demonstrate a novel way to calculate the regional competitiveness index under a two-stage objective general index (OGI) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compute the regional competitiveness index under a two-stage OGI framework. In the first stage, they aggregate the sub-factor level information into a factor level index; in the second stage, they use the factor level index to obtain a regional competitiveness index.

Findings

The authors discuss the properties of the proposed index in detail. They further analyse five periods of regional competitiveness of Peru spanning the period 2008-2015. Among others, the results reveal the existence of the resource curse of the mining regions of Peru.

Practical implications

The paper is a contribution to the practical measurement of competitiveness.

Social implications

The calculation of a regional competitiveness index is vital for improving the competitiveness of the countries and for reducing regional inequalities.

Originality/value

When compared to the existent methods available in the literature, the advantage of the proposed method resides in the fact that the derived index has a positive correlation with the factor-level indices and the factor-level indices have a positive correlation with the sub-factor-level information.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2016

Vincent Charles

Abstract

Details

Journal of Centrum Cathedra, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1851-6599

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Vincent Charles and Rajiv D. Banker

Abstract

Details

Journal of Centrum Cathedra, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1851-6599

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2016

Vincent Charles and Rajiv D. Banker

Abstract

Details

Journal of Centrum Cathedra, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1851-6599

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Sergio J. Chión, Vincent Charles and José Morales

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediator role that knowledge sharing plays between organisational culture, organisational structure, and technology…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediator role that knowledge sharing plays between organisational culture, organisational structure, and technology infrastructure and process improvement in a knowledge management context in manufacturing enterprises operating in the food, beverage and textile industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study is conducted with a sample of 200 food, beverage and textile companies. Data are obtained by means of a survey questionnaire applied to general managers in each of the sample firms. The impact of the factors organisational culture, organisational structure and technology infrastructure on process improvement via knowledge sharing is assessed. Structural equation modelling and maximum likelihood estimation are applied to find the direction and strength of the relationships.

Findings

The main findings indicate the significant relationships between knowledge sharing and process improvement, between organisational culture and knowledge sharing, and between organisational structure and knowledge sharing. The relationship between technology infrastructure and knowledge sharing is found not to be significant.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the present study are limited to the food, beverage and textile industry. Future research could incorporate data from other manufacturing sectors or service companies.

Practical implications

This study provides practical guidance for general managers who wish to implement process improvement programmes.

Originality/value

Several authors have noted that there are few research studies concerning the interaction between each phase of knowledge management and total quality management practices. This study is interested in knowledge sharing and its impact on process improvement in a knowledge management context.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Mukesh Kumar, K.S. Sujit and Vincent Charles

The purpose of this paper is to propose the microeconomics concept of elasticity to estimate the SERVQUAL gap elasticity to derive important insights for service providers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose the microeconomics concept of elasticity to estimate the SERVQUAL gap elasticity to derive important insights for service providers to develop the right strategies to bridge the overall gap in service.

Design/methodology/approach

The dimensions of SERVQUAL adopted from Parasuraman et al. (1988) and Kumar et al. (2009) are first verified for their unidimensionality using structural equation modeling and reliability in the context of United Arab Emirates banking industry. Furthermore, the technique of dominance analysis is used to derive the relative importance of dimensions for different groups of banks. Finally, the stepwise log-linear regression models are used to estimate the gap elasticity to measure the responsiveness of the overall SERVQUAL gap to a change in customers’ perception on different dimension.

Findings

The results reveal that the dimension which is prioritized as the most important dimension need not to be the one to be targeted under the resource constraint to react faster to the changes of customers’ banking behavior.

Originality/value

This is probably the first attempt to examine the service quality through gap elasticity. This method is especially useful when the traditional approach to measure relative importance of critical factors fails to clearly discriminate between two or more dimensions, which, in turn, may lead to failure in decision making to choose the right strategies to bridge the overall gap in the service.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2015

Vincent Charles

Abstract

Details

Journal of Centrum Cathedra: The Business and Economics Research Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1851-6599

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1982

Charles Ellis, Vincent McDonald, Stuart Hannabuss and Tony Wills

IMMEDIATELY after the EGM in January the editor invited me to write something about publishing since, as he put it, ‘people don't seem to know much about it.’ He suggested…

Abstract

IMMEDIATELY after the EGM in January the editor invited me to write something about publishing since, as he put it, ‘people don't seem to know much about it.’ He suggested 1500 words: I have a straight, unvarnished tale to tell and will therefore resist commentary, though the temptation to irony is not absent!

Details

New Library World, vol. 83 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Abstract

Details

Business Models and Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-462-1

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