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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Lina Dagilienė, Jurgita Bruneckienė, Robertas Jucevičius and Mantas Lukauskas

This paper aims to investigate theoretically and empirically the interactions between smart economic development (SED) and competitiveness in Central and Eastern European…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate theoretically and empirically the interactions between smart economic development (SED) and competitiveness in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries. The main argument to uphold here is that smartness approach has been traditionally more focused on smart urban planning and smart specialization.

Design/methodology/approach

An evaluation by index, correlation and significance analysis is used to present original empirical evidence from six CEE countries.

Findings

Smartness approach integration into economic development justifies the identification of SED determinants: basics (welfare, digitality, environmental, social responsibility) and enhancers (learning, networking, agility, innovations and knowledge-driven). The interaction between SED and countries’ competitiveness in CEE countries might be described by two approaches, namely, focus-based (several most important basics and enhancers) and balance-based (equal importance of basics and enhancers).

Research limitations/implications

The limitations relate to the particular sample of CEE countries and gathering opportunities of statistical data.

Practical implications

The combination of SED-Index sub-indices and WEF GCI might aid a more accurate ex ante measurement. Despite common global challenges, each country should choose its own combinations for smartness determinants to achieve long-term competitiveness.

Social implications

The findings are important for fostering smartness approach in economic development for long-term competitiveness.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to economic development literature by discovering basics and enhancers for SED. By linking well-known term of competitiveness and economic development with a concept of smartness, the new approaches, namely, focus-based and balance-based, to policy making in CEE countries emerged.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Harry P. Bowen and Wim Moesen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the ranking of countries based on the World Economic Forum's (WEF') competitiveness index is changed when the underlying…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the ranking of countries based on the World Economic Forum's (WEF') competitiveness index is changed when the underlying primitive data dimensions of this composite index are aggregated using weights that are endogenously determined for each country, instead of aggregated using the WEF's fixed set of weights applied to all countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a method based on data envelopment analysis to determine weights for aggregating the underlying primitive data dimensions of any composite indicator. The approach determines endogenously the “best” weights a given observational unit (e.g. country) on the basis of its revealed performance on each primitive sub‐dimension underlying a composite index. The ranking of countries based on the values of a composite competitiveness index that uses the proposed endogenous weight method is then compared to the ranking based on the WEF's competitiveness index for the year 2006. The rankings are then compared and assessed to determine if the observed difference in the rankings are statistically significant.

Findings

A comparison of the ranking of countries on the basis of the value of each index reveals that countries do undergo a change in their competitiveness rank when endogenous weights are used. The results suggest the WEF's competitiveness index, which uses the same fixed weights applied to every country (or group of countries), creates a bias that favors countries that score high on the “technology” sub‐dimension of the index.

Practical implications

The study presents an alternative to the current practice of using a fixed set of weights applied uniformly to the basic unit of analysis. The method serves as a starting‐point for further research on the biases created by different weighting schemes to construct a composite indicator that aggregates primitive data, with the resulting composite index values then used to rank entities.

Originality/value

The method to determine endogenously the weights to be applied to each unit of analysis when constructing a composite indicator is novel and has wide applicability to the general issue of comparing performance across different units of analysis based on a composite index of performance (i.e. benchmarking).

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Vincent Charles and Tomonari Sei

Regional competitiveness refers to the capacity of a region to manage its resources and competencies to increase the well-being of its people. Measuring regional…

Abstract

Purpose

Regional competitiveness refers to the capacity of a region to manage its resources and competencies to increase the well-being of its people. Measuring regional competitiveness is, thus, a major consideration for policymakers, businesses and the academic community in their endeavour to improve the same. This paper aims to demonstrate a novel way to calculate the regional competitiveness index under a two-stage objective general index (OGI) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compute the regional competitiveness index under a two-stage OGI framework. In the first stage, they aggregate the sub-factor level information into a factor level index; in the second stage, they use the factor level index to obtain a regional competitiveness index.

Findings

The authors discuss the properties of the proposed index in detail. They further analyse five periods of regional competitiveness of Peru spanning the period 2008-2015. Among others, the results reveal the existence of the resource curse of the mining regions of Peru.

Practical implications

The paper is a contribution to the practical measurement of competitiveness.

Social implications

The calculation of a regional competitiveness index is vital for improving the competitiveness of the countries and for reducing regional inequalities.

Originality/value

When compared to the existent methods available in the literature, the advantage of the proposed method resides in the fact that the derived index has a positive correlation with the factor-level indices and the factor-level indices have a positive correlation with the sub-factor-level information.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Ícaro Célio Santos de Carvalho, Luiz Carlos Di Serio, Camilla Maria Cavalcante Guimarães and Karina Santos Furlanetto

This study aims to evaluate the competitiveness of nations and seeks to answer the following research question: how does the competitiveness of nations include…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the competitiveness of nations and seeks to answer the following research question: how does the competitiveness of nations include improvements in the quality of life, thus influencing and contributing to social progress in both social and economic indices?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper collected secondary data from the World Economic Forum and the socioeconomic dimensions of the Social Progress Imperative Index and considered the dimensions of these indices, which were demonstrated using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The main focus was on the documentary analysis that was carried out to explain the realities of 121 countries from 2014 to 2017 as taken from these indices, considering the 10 countries at the top and bottom.

Findings

This study showed the use of new measures for the performance of nations that are less dependent on economics and focus more on social development, which may be a trend for the future of nations, and produce a more holistic view for the study. “Innovation” is the factor with the weakest relationship with social progress, which is justified by a weaker relationship with one of the subcategories, “basic human needs”, when analyzed in isolation. However, when the authors analyze the best and worst nations, the authors observe that economic factors are still prevalent, with the “institutions” and “infrastructure” factors being effective for improving competitiveness and the quality of life.

Research limitations/implications

The findings represent a new, emerging configuration in country performance, but the study has its limitations, such as the use of only two pooled variables and the fact that it does not correlate their dimensions or variables.

Originality/value

This study can represents an expansion logic for measuring the performance of countries considering social factors. The main contributions of this study are its statistical evidence and documentary analysis of the relationship between economic and social variables. The main contribution of this paper is to show that over time (2014–2017) economic factors, as measured by the competitiveness index of nations, relate to aspects of social welfare, as measured by the social progress index.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Zhanna Belyaeva, Vadim Krivorotov, Alexey Kalina and Sergey Yerypalov

This paper aims to investigate the competitiveness of Russian regional medium-sized oil complexes with relatively small fossil oil reserves. Taking into account the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the competitiveness of Russian regional medium-sized oil complexes with relatively small fossil oil reserves. Taking into account the urgency for competitiveness, the authors have developed a specific assessment methodology and competitive development strategy that could be implemented within the framework of a scenario approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The suggested methodology for assessing the competitiveness of regional production complexes is based on the pattern method. Validation is provided for a modular structure and an approach to constructing indices of competitiveness of production complexes. A system of competitiveness indicators has been devised in relation to regional oil complexes.

Findings

The case study of the oil complex of the Republic of Udmurtia has yielded competitiveness assessment forecast for a variety of development scenarios up until 2025. A methodology of competitiveness assessment is proposed as a result of the analysis of the two cases.

Research limitations/implications

This analysis is based on the oil complex in Udmurtia, Russia. The main limitation of the research scope is the extent and nature of the industrial complex. The proposed design can be used for large industrial complexes operating in the field of industrial production. It needs to be extended to more clusters, more industries and other countries’ settings for the sake of comparison and generalization.

Practical implications

The practical effects of the study suggest a set of strategic development tools of assessment of the dynamics of industrial complexes’ development, identification of competitive advantage and “bottlenecks” and definition of the objectives and programs of their long-term development and justification of policies and programs of perspective development.

Originality/value

This paper reveals specific features of oil complexes’ competitiveness, which has seldom been investigated both theoretically and empirically.

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Francisco Coronado, Vincent Charles and Rocky J. Dwyer

The purpose of this paper is to incorporate factors that characterize the agricultural activity as productivity indices to compute the agricultural competitiveness of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to incorporate factors that characterize the agricultural activity as productivity indices to compute the agricultural competitiveness of regions in order to rank the regions, and compare the results with those obtained by applying other commonly used social and economic indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify regional factors related to the use of water, soil, production, revenues, and rural population, which conform a total of six productivity indices, that the authors then employ to calculate the regional agricultural competitiveness index.

Findings

The agricultural-related indices are informative in supporting the regional ranking related to resources and technology utilization. The results reveal that the coastal regions are the most competitive when compared to the regions located in the highlands and the jungle. Nevertheless, in contrast with other existing competitiveness rankings, the present study identifies the regions with the greatest potential for agriculture.

Research limitations/implications

The authors identify the regions which have a higher potential of development considering the natural resources and agricultural production. The authors hope that this paper can assist regional and national policymakers in their endeavor to improve regional and national competitiveness.

Practical implications

The authors identify the regions with a higher potential of development considering natural resources and agricultural production and the possibilities to improve their competitiveness.

Social implications

The study also bears social implications, given that the rural activities in Peru are carried out by approx. 7 million inhabitants, whose contribution to the gross domestic product (GDP) is as much as 7 percent, making use of about 94 percent of the available water.

Originality/value

The originality of the present paper resides in the attempt to compute a regional competitiveness index by taking agricultural resources as determinant factors. The authors rank the regions based on their agricultural competitiveness.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Viet Van Hoang

This study aims to (1) identify the agricultural competitiveness of ASEAN countries in the global markets; (2) analyze the dynamics of these indicators for the period…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to (1) identify the agricultural competitiveness of ASEAN countries in the global markets; (2) analyze the dynamics of these indicators for the period 1997–2015; and (3) test the consistency between trade indices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses RCA, RTA, and NRCA for the first objective; OLS method and Markov matrix for the second objective; and statistic tool for the final purpose.

Findings

The results show that: (1) ASEAN countries achieve the strongest competitiveness in rice, rubber, spices, vegetable fat and oils, wood, fuel wood, fish, and crustacean. Vietnam, Thailand, and Indonesia are the strongest competitive whilst Brunei, Singapore, and Cambodia are the weakest competitive; (2) They have convergent patterns in agricultural competitiveness; (3) They successfully maintain rankings of the strong competitive sectors; and (4) ASEAN countries obtain benefits from the regional integration and the specialization in competitive products.

Research limitations/implications

ASEAN countries with strong competitiveness should specialize in and maintain their rankings to enhance competitiveness and maximize social welfare while the countries with weak agricultural competitiveness should specialize in the processed products and services based on their advantages of economic resources.

Originality/value

Comprehensive results of the static and dynamic agricultural competitiveness of ASEAN countries as a whole are provided. The findings and policy recommendations can be used by policymakers and enterprises to improve competitiveness and benefit. The discussions and findings should be a significant reference for economists.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Esteban Lafuente, László Szerb and András Rideg

The analysis of the interconnectedness between resources and capabilities, and the way businesses use them as competitive weapons is a central element of the strategic…

Abstract

Purpose

The analysis of the interconnectedness between resources and capabilities, and the way businesses use them as competitive weapons is a central element of the strategic management literature. Finding the appropriate configuration of competitive pillars is particularly relevant for resource-constrained small businesses. Drawing on the resource-based view and the configuration theory, this study evaluates the effect of both competitiveness and the configuration of the competitiveness system on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An index methodology based on the configuration theory was used to compute the competitiveness index on a unique sample of 625 Hungarian small- and medium-sized firms. The study hypotheses were tested via regression analysis.

Findings

Results show that the impact of competitiveness-enhancing strategies is conditional on the configuration of the system of competencies. Low-competitive businesses benefit more from investments in the weakest competitive pillar, while strategies oriented to improve more than one competitive pillar yield higher competitiveness improvements among high-competitive businesses. Our findings also indicate that competitiveness positively impacts performance, and that the exploitation of competitive strengths leads to superior results among high-competitive businesses.

Originality/value

By employing an index methodology, our analysis contributes to unveil how competitiveness impact business performance. The proposed analysis has value for scholars and strategy makers by showing how the configuration of the business' competitive system—in terms of competitive strengths and weaknesses—conditions the generally positive impact of competitiveness enhancing actions linked to the acquisition or development of resources and capabilities.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Nirmalkumar Singh Moirangthem and Barnali Nag

Developing composite index-regional entrepreneurship, technological readiness and institution quality index (RETRIQ) of regional entrepreneurship, technology readiness and…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing composite index-regional entrepreneurship, technological readiness and institution quality index (RETRIQ) of regional entrepreneurship, technology readiness and quality of institution to measure regional competitiveness. This study, also, aims to test econometrically the effectiveness of the index in capturing the economic performance of the sub-national regions.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of eight indicators used in the index are from sources available freely in the public domain. The causal relationship analysis is done using panel data of 10 years from 2008 to 2017 for 32 Indian states/union territories. The generalized method of moments (GMM) is used for this dynamic regression estimation.

Findings

Based on RETRIQ, 32 states and union territories of India have ranked. The estimation using GMM shows a significant association between the composite index and economic growth.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the study include the broad assumption that these sub-national regions belong to a uniform macro-economic and technology environment and data constraints as it is a longitudinal study. Then, the implication of the study is that the composite index-RETRIQ could capture differences in regional competitiveness explaining regional economic disparity.

Practical implications

The index will be useful for policy implications in the assessment of competitiveness disparity.

Originality/value

It is a composite index of regional entrepreneurship, technological readiness and quality of the institution. The panel data across states along 10 years series is novel.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Mihaela Herciu and Claudia Ogrean

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize that the growing of competitiveness at any level may be possible through more responsibility (business ethics) on the one hand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize that the growing of competitiveness at any level may be possible through more responsibility (business ethics) on the one hand and less corruption (as lack of business ethics) on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective of the paper is to identify the double‐way relationships between competitiveness and the responsible (beyond ethics) behaviour. In order to do this, the authors used correlation indexes CORREL and R2 and the graphic representation able to illustrate the above‐mentioned interrelations.

Findings

The authors observed that there is a strong and direct correlation between GCI, RCI and CPI – at national level, and six possible situations which reflect the interrelations between NP and FGP.

Research limitations/implications

The paper may be continued with specific behavioural models of MNEs in different host countries – integrating different approaches of business ethics.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the paper consist in offering some guidelines/starting points for firms in the search of global competitiveness through responsible/ethical conduct.

Originality/value

The paper develops a new conceptual framework, which integrates two “obsessions” of nowadays (competitiveness and responsibility) into the concept of global performance – national and firm related.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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