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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Amber Jensen

This paper aims to recommend that English educators engage preservice teachers (PSTs) in thinking and acting agentively in twenty-first century writing instruction by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to recommend that English educators engage preservice teachers (PSTs) in thinking and acting agentively in twenty-first century writing instruction by prompting them to examine and (re)construct discourses around identity, beliefs and teaching contexts. It explores metacognitive interventions that supported one PST to assume agency to implement twenty-first century writing pedagogies that challenged institutional and curricular norms.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design was used to explore how one PST enacted agency in teaching twenty-first century writing during student teaching. Data were collected from five stimulated recall interviews that prompted metacognition over a four-month internship semester. Emerging themes were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings

During interviews, the PST constructed narratives about herself, her beliefs and her teaching context in ways that catalyzed her agency to enact twenty-first century writing pedagogies in planning for instruction, framing learning with her students and negotiating with her colleagues. The PST perceived metacognitive intervention as a supportive framework for activating her agency to both “see” and “sell” (Nowacek, 2011) possibilities for implementing twenty-first century writing instruction in her first teaching context.

Originality/value

While most existing literature on teacher agency focuses on practicing teachers, this paper focuses on activating agency during teacher preparation. It draws upon theories of regulative discourse (Mills, 2015), transfer (Nowacek, 2011) and metacognition as constructs for agency to identify how English educators can prepare PSTs as agents for change.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2017

Frederick Thomas Cawood

The purpose of this paper is to interpret current global events to extrapolate the issues of twenty-first century for consideration by African mining policy and decision-makers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to interpret current global events to extrapolate the issues of twenty-first century for consideration by African mining policy and decision-makers.

Design/methodology/approach

The high-level mining issues are identified to assess what lies ahead for the twenty-first century. Some of these require innovation, called beacons for twenty-first-century mining in this paper, so that decision-makers can consider policy instruments and management strategies to craft a more desirable future for governments and companies, without affecting other stakeholders negatively.

Findings

It is proposed that African mining should consider three cross-cutting elements as subsets for the existing policy themes and management decisions, namely, broad benefit, mine sustainability and business improvement. Digital technologies have the potential to significantly support the three elements for fast-tracking Africa’s sustainable economic development.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings can be applied to most of the developing world, the focus of this paper is on the African mining industry.

Practical implications

Practical considerations for policymakers in Africa.

Originality/value

This paper includes novel/original policy considerations that have the potential to become cross-cutting elements for the existing policy themes of the Africa Mining Vision.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Janet Onomeh Ubogu

This study discusses the role of librarian in the 21st century. Libraries are in a state of dilemma due to dramatic changes that information and communication technologies…

Abstract

This study discusses the role of librarian in the 21st century. Libraries are in a state of dilemma due to dramatic changes that information and communication technologies (ICTs) have brought to libraries. Libraries are faced with various challenges including insufficient funds, but the inability of librarians to acquire IT skills relevant to addressing 21st century library services could be seen as a more difficult challenge, because without these skills it will be difficult for today's librarians to render adequate services to their patrons. Therefore, it is important for librarians to recognize and proactively seek to acquire the ICT skills needed to deliver 21st century library services to their patrons. This means that librarians need to also recognize the need to continually update themselves to keep up with today's fast-paced IT changes so that they will be able to deliver what is expected of them in this new millennium.

Details

Examining the impact of industry 4.0 on academic libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-656-5

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2012

Vladimir Rukavishnikov

Efficiency of peace-building relies on a vision of the future, partly at least. But nobody can provide a forecast free from prejudice and attitudes deeply rooted in the…

Abstract

Efficiency of peace-building relies on a vision of the future, partly at least. But nobody can provide a forecast free from prejudice and attitudes deeply rooted in the past. As a result, many so-called long-term “forecasts” are actually “geopolitical fantasies.” The chapter tackles forecasts of the possible fate of the United States, the European Union, Russia, and China in the twenty-first century, a general issue of war and peace in both the remote and foreseeable futures, and prospects of peace-building.

Details

Cooperation for a Peaceful and Sustainable World Part 1
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-335-3

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

W. Mark Fruin and Masao Nakamura

This paper aims to present a general review of the circumstances of America and Japan's rapid corporate, economic and industrial development in the twentieth century.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a general review of the circumstances of America and Japan's rapid corporate, economic and industrial development in the twentieth century.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach considered and evaluated how the circumstances of America and Japan's growth might apply to China and India, two of the fastest growing economies of the twenty‐first century.

Findings

The findings suggest that both America and Japan might be considered exceptional cases and, as such, neither one might be regarded as a good model for emulation. However, the circumstances of Japan's rapid growth appear closer to those of contemporary China and India and on that basis the authors suggest that Japan might be a better model for emulation.

Originality/value

The American model is too novel and unlikely to be imitated, replicated or repeated whereas Japan's high population density, agrarian origins, state assisted and administered development, adaptation and hybridization of local and imported methods and technologies, kinship, pseudo‐kinship and locality based business groupings, and rapid, come‐from‐behind charge toward industrialization, urbanization and international emergence, all suggest that Japan offers a more relevant and useful development model.

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Iain A. MacLeod

Traditional engineering education in the UK, as established in the nineteenth century, is based on the principle that a degree in engineering should be focused on…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional engineering education in the UK, as established in the nineteenth century, is based on the principle that a degree in engineering should be focused on engineering science and not on the practice of engineering. This has proved to be seriously negative to the development of engineering ability in general and innovative engineering in particular. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the reasons for this situation.

Design/methodology/approach

Features of innovative engineering are outlined and a structure for learning which has potential to promote innovation is proposed.

Findings

Because of principles based on misplaced academic elitism established in the nineteenth century, traditional engineering curricula tend to develop an academic mindset rather than an engineering mindset in students. They do little to support innovative engineering. As a result, the large amount of money spent on engineering education in the UK does not represent a good investment. The academic mindset does not well support any professional context.

Originality/value

The paper provides a challenge to universities and professional engineering institutions which should be addressed.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Lanndon Ocampo, Venus Acedillo, Alin Mae Bacunador, Charity Christine Balo, Yvonne Joreen Lagdameo and Nickha Shanen Tupa

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical account of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) based on the existing literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical account of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) based on the existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper performs keywords search of published articles from 1930 to 2017 in widely used research databases.

Findings

The historical review shows that the OCB, as a field of study, was slow to develop. Although it has been introduced in the late 1970s and officially defined in the 1980s, its origins can be traced back to the 1930s. Despite this, OCB is generally regarded as a relatively new construct and has become one of the biggest subjects studied in the literature. OCB has reached far and wide into the business and management domains, supporting the fact that the well-being employees and their behaviors can greatly affect organizations’ effectiveness and performance. Having been the topic of a significant number of studies, there have been inconsistent research findings regarding the concepts. Furthermore, some concepts have been noted to overlap, with several scholars using different terms for essentially similar concepts.

Originality/value

The advent of technology and globalization has greatly affected organizations today which resulted in increased competition in the global business. Firms have started to look into the behavior exhibited by employees as a means of achieving competitive advantage, such as OCB. Voluminous works have been conducted regarding the study of OCB; however, none have been recorded to make an in-depth exploration of when and how it first surfaced. Since its official introduction, explorations regarding OCB have dramatically increased, most especially in the twenty-first century. Unfortunately, this has resulted in an increasing difficulty to keep up with the theoretical and empirical developments in the literature. As interest in OCB continues to grow, coherent integration of the concept becomes progressively more complex and necessary. This paper looks into the chronological evolution of the OCB, giving precise details of its development from the time it was first conceptualized up until the present wherein OCB has been used to indicate organizational effectiveness and performance.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Jacqueline Manuel and Don Carter

This paper provides a critical interpretative analysis of the first secondary English syllabus for schools in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, contained within the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a critical interpretative analysis of the first secondary English syllabus for schools in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, contained within the Courses for Study for High Schools (New South Wales Department of Public Instruction, 1911). The purpose of the paper is to examine the “continuities that link English curriculum discourses and practices with previous discourses and practices” in the rhetorical curriculum. The analysis identifies those aspects of the 1911 English syllabus that have since become normative and challenges the appropriateness of certain enduring orthodoxies in a twenty-first century context.

Design/methodology/approach

Focussing on a landmark historical curriculum document from 1911, this paper draws on methods of historical comparative and documentary analysis. It sits within the tradition of historical curriculum research that critiques curriculum documents as a primary source for understanding continuities of discourses and practices. A social constructionist approach informs the analysis.

Findings

The conceptualisation of subject English evident in the structure, content and emphases of the 1911 English syllabus encodes a range of “discourses and practices” that have in some form endured or been “reconstituted and remade” (Cormack, 2008, p. 275) over the course of a century. The analysis draws attention to those aspects of the subject that have remained unproblematised and taken-for-granted, and the implications of this for universal student participation and attainment.

Originality/value

This paper reorients critical attention to a significant historical curriculum document that has not, to date, been explored against the backdrop twenty-first century senior secondary English curriculum. In doing so, it presents extended insights into a range of now normative structures, beliefs, ideas, assumptions and practices and questions the potential impact of these on student learning, access and achievement in senior secondary English in NSW in the twenty-first century.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Melissa L. Burgess and Phil Ice

Online learning in higher education has, until most recently, been delivered primarily through learning management systems (LMS) such as BlackBoard, Moodle, and others…

Abstract

Online learning in higher education has, until most recently, been delivered primarily through learning management systems (LMS) such as BlackBoard, Moodle, and others. However, responding to budgetary concerns and burgeoning enrollments, delivery of online learning via multiple open source (free) formats, is quickly becoming an attractive and inexpensive option for online distance and learning programs. Multi-user virtual environments, or MUVEs, are one such option that provides an interactive and socially rich learning experience for learners. In this chapter, the authors propose a dually fused pedagogical framework that has the potential to provide both asynchronous and synchronous online learning activities the elicit critical thinking skills and that further align with additional skills twenty-first century learners and instructors need to compete in today's global society.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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