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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Tristram Hooley

This paper aims to discuss the role of the internet in framing individual’s career building. It argues that the 7 Cs of digital career literacy offer a useful framework…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the role of the internet in framing individual’s career building. It argues that the 7 Cs of digital career literacy offer a useful framework for those working in learning and development in organizations. Every individual needs to engage with the internet when thinking about how to manage and future-proof their careers. Learning and development (L&D) professionals can support employees to harness the power of the internet and learn how to make use of the new opportunities of “digital career management”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper highlights steps that every individual needs to take for “digital career management” and pulls out the role of L&D professionals in addressing the developing internet context.

Findings

Sets out “7 C’s” for proactively managing a “digital career profile”.

Originality/value

The internet has shifted the context for career building and learning how to maximize the opportunities now offered is the central task for anyone wishing to carve out their future careers.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Cathy Brown, Tristram Hooley and Tracey Wond

Career theorists have been increasingly occupied with role transitions across organisations, neglecting role transitions undertaken within single organisations. By…

Abstract

Purpose

Career theorists have been increasingly occupied with role transitions across organisations, neglecting role transitions undertaken within single organisations. By exploring in depth the aspects of career capital that role holders need to facilitate their own organisational role transition, this article builds upon career capital theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting an interpretivist approach, this study explores the experiences of 36 business leaders who have undertaken a recent role transition within a UK construction business.

Findings

The article empirically characterises 24 career capital aspects, clustered into Knowing Self, Knowing How and Knowing Whom. It argues that these aspects are important to internal role transitions and compares them to mainstream career capital theory. In addition, the concepts of connecting, crossing and investing career capital are introduced to explain how career capital supports such transitions.

Research limitations/implications

This study proposes a new career capital framework and refocuses debate on organisational careers. It is based on a single organisation, and it would be beneficial for future researchers to explore its applicability within other organisations.

Practical implications

The article explores the implications of the new career capital framework for business leaders and organisational managers who wish to build individual and organisational career mobility.

Originality/value

This study proposes a new, empirically grounded, career capital theoretical framework particularly attending to organisational role transitions.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2010

Carol Edwards

This paper presents the findings from a UK study of one hundred part‐time research students. The participants were students attending one of a series of training days…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings from a UK study of one hundred part‐time research students. The participants were students attending one of a series of training days provided specifically for part‐time research students. Free text responses were collected on: what it’s like being a part‐time research student; what they would like from training events; and what they thought of this series of training days. The students were particularly appreciative of the opportunity to meet fellow part‐time research students, albeit in different disciplines and at different stages of their PhD. Rather than solely listing specific research skills they would like covered, most of their ideas for future training sessions concerned more nebulous personal and emotional aspects of the experience of studying for a PhD on a part‐time basis. Four dimensions of training need were identified: research techniques; research skills; engagement with the part‐time PhD process; and engagement with their part‐time peers. It is suggested that research training involving part‐time research students, could usefully build in time to focus explicitly on some aspect(s) of the more personal and emotional elements of the parttime doctoral experience, as well as on technical aspects of research work.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

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