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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Richard Reeves-Ellington

Organizational studies fail to examine organizations in terms of the several environments in which they operate, both internally and externally. That is, studies tend to…

Abstract

Organizational studies fail to examine organizations in terms of the several environments in which they operate, both internally and externally. That is, studies tend to focus on climate, or time, or trust, or leadership. This chapter builds on academic research that discusses organizational environments in ways that show all of these environments are important for organizational understanding, especially for organizational leadership. In particular, this chapter offers a paradigm of understanding organizational leadership realities through multi-level understanding of the organizational environments of climate, knowledge, ethnos, and time.

The chapter first discusses five enviroscapes – climate, knowledge, ethos, time, and leadership. Each of these enviroscapes has two phenotypes – business and commerce. Each of these enviroscapes, with its concomitant phenotypes, is used differently at multiple levels of management and leadership by senior managers, middle managers, and entry-level managers. The scope of organizational reach, in terms of global, regional, and local levels of analysis, provides additional context for the use of enviroscapes. After a review of the theoretical bases for each enviroscape, the chapter applies appropriate theory and models to an extended time case study of land purchase in Indonesia.

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Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-503-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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19060

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Trygve Gulbrandsen and Ursula Hoffmann-Lange

Several scholars have maintained that corporatist arrangements may contribute to a national consensus between groups with opposing interests (Katzenstein, 1985; Siaroff

Abstract

Several scholars have maintained that corporatist arrangements may contribute to a national consensus between groups with opposing interests (Katzenstein, 1985; Siaroff, 1999). Some have even described (neo) corporatism as a strategy for consensus building (Woldendorp, 1995). These general viewpoints seem to imply that participation in the various channels and networks in a corporatist system may influence participants to moderate their ideological attitudes, to become more centrist. Participation has a “civilising” effect. In a study of the Swedish industrial relations system Öberg and Svensson (2002) concluded, however, that there is not much trust across the class borders, a finding which questions the validity of these assumptions. It seems therefore appropriate to test these assumptions empirically in a variety of national settings.

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Comparative Studies of Social and Political Elites
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-466-9

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Magdalena Maria Holtzhausen and Petro Botha

The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative leadership development program, which forms part of a corporate social responsibility (CSR) outreach. The program…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative leadership development program, which forms part of a corporate social responsibility (CSR) outreach. The program aims to develop the leadership of school principals in under-resourced communities in South Africa, while simultaneously developing the business partners paired with these principals. Through creatively combining various leadership development interventions, the human and social capital of the school principals and collaborating leaders are expanded to prepare them for an uncertain, volatile environment. This paper focuses on the learning experiences of the business partners. The program exposes business leaders to scenarios that develop unique leadership skills.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted with a purposive sample of 73 business leaders who completed the 12-month leadership development program. A qualitative approach was followed, consisting of an online survey that predominantly required a narrative description of leaders’ perceptions and experiences. The qualitative feedback was thematically analyzed.

Findings

The findings indicated that the use of combined leadership development interventions is important in adequately preparing leaders for the challenges of a changing and unpredictable environment.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the research are limited by the small sample of 73 business leaders from a population of 294. Inferential statistics could not be conducted and responses to the survey cannot be regarded as representative of the total population. Possible bias may exist through utilizing a purposive sampling technique; however, this was counteracted through rigorous research, cross-checking and quality assurance initiatives.

Practical implications

The presented program innovatively combines the benefits of a CSR program with shared value in human and social capital. Business leaders are exposed to various leadership development interventions. This approach effectively prepares business leaders to deal with multifaceted contextual issues within a diverse, complex and volatile environment. The present paper shows that through successfully cultivating better leadership development initiatives and adopting appropriate and pertinent development programs, human and social capital available for economic progress are appropriately managed and channeled. Furthermore, resource exchange is enhanced through establishing strong interpersonal relations. This collaboration acts as a forerunner to business success. Hence, through adopting such intervention programs and teaching their processes and procedures, the development and implementation of positive public policy can be assisted.

Social implications

The value of the current research on public attitude is that its results imply and create the belief and acceptance that uncertainty and disparity can be alleviated through developing strong interpersonal relations that improve the exchange of resources through the collaboration of public and business stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper introduces an innovative leadership development program, which, as part of a CSR initiative, aims to improve the leadership of school principals in under-resourced schools, while simultaneously developing the business leaders involved in the initiative. This is done through partnering a school principal with a business leader in a formal participatory leadership development program. Research shows that the unique combinations of leadership development interventions cultivate school principals and business leaders who are emotionally and culturally intelligent, resilient and well prepared to push willingly beyond and across boundaries in unfamiliar environments.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Emmanuel Quansah and Dale E. Hartz

Approximately half of all new businesses fail within the first five years of operation. This study was undertaken to understand the behavior of small business (SB) leaders

Abstract

Purpose

Approximately half of all new businesses fail within the first five years of operation. This study was undertaken to understand the behavior of small business (SB) leaders, including their decision-making processes and adaptive leadership practices that enable their organizations to survive during periods of general crisis and intense competition.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to understand the lived experiences of our research participants, a constructivist grounded theory approach was used. Thirty-two CEOs and leaders from fifteen organizations were interviewed.

Findings

It was determined that successful SB leaders avoid organizational complacency by being continuous learners, who are agile and flexible in determining appropriate management strategies. Additionally, they leverage time management processes, build strong and productive relationship networks and create positive family-oriented workplace cultures to increase their odds of survival.

Research limitations/implications

This qualitative study was limited to interviews, observations and analysis of organizational archetypes; therefore, the authors can establish a pattern in behavior but cannot make a causality claim.

Practical implications

The findings provide SB leaders with effective concepts, practices and strategies from members of their peer group, which they can test, refine and implement.

Social implications

The impact of business failures is often devastating financially and emotionally for the families and employees involved. Learning methods for strategic adaptation that may help avoid business closures could provide a positive societal contribution.

Originality/value

There is little empirical research about how SBs strategically adapt during challenging periods. This study helps fill that gap and provides an understanding of how SB leaders adapt to continuous challenges, create value and remain competitive in difficult business environments.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 36 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Lauren Klaus and Mario Fernando

By applying Parameshwar’s (2005) ego-transcendence model to two influential business leaders, the purpose of this paper is to examine how social innovation is promoted by…

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2225

Abstract

Purpose

By applying Parameshwar’s (2005) ego-transcendence model to two influential business leaders, the purpose of this paper is to examine how social innovation is promoted by business leaders through spiritual leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used research tactics available within a phenomenological framework.

Findings

Based on the analysis of the two business leader case studies, several links between spiritual leadership and social innovation were identified. The central role of a higher purpose in enacting spiritual leadership as well as bringing about social innovation was most significant.

Research limitations/implications

Use of secondary data, the inherent weaknesses in analysis based on a single individual’s interpretations and the analysis of only two business leaders were key limitations. A unique overlap was found between Dawson and Daniel’s (2010) social innovation model and Parameshwar’s (2005) ego-transcendence model.

Practical implications

As higher purpose was a key element in enacting spiritual leadership, leaders could look for the seeds of a higher purpose within the challenging circumstances of a situation. By shaping one’s behaviour to a higher purpose-related social cause than merely following rules and procedures or social conventions, leaders are more likely to develop their own personal decision-making style. By highlighting the importance of paying attention to the suffering of others rather one’s own suffering, the study also have implications for reducing the ego-based practices in day to day leadership in organisations.

Originality/value

Ego-transcendence model explains the link between social innovation and spiritual leadership in a non-organisational setting. The current study applies this link to the leadership context in business.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Christoffer Ellehuus

The aim of this paper is to examine how organizations can support their leaders in taking on the challenges of their leadership roles, including how to effectively manage…

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1740

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine how organizations can support their leaders in taking on the challenges of their leadership roles, including how to effectively manage talent on a larger scale as they move up the ranks. The author aims to discuss the findings of a study by Corporate Executive Board (CEB) into the support required to move from being a business leader to a talent champion. This study built upon previous CEB research, which had shown that the way managers manage their teams can have a significant impact on key business outcomes. It aimed to explore practical ways for organizations to support executives in making the leap from managing an individual team to facing the challenge of leading a business unit or business function comprising a broad portfolio of talent effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2009, CEB undertook a 360‐degree survey of more than 8,000 business leaders based in North America, Europe, Asia, and South Africa exploring managers' skills, their knowledge, the proportion of time they spent on tasks related to their role and their attitude towards talent management. The survey was also opened up to their own managers and their direct reports. CEB followed this by interviewing hundreds of heads of HR globally, to determine how involved business leaders are in succession planning and their accountability for talent and business outcomes.

Findings

The research found that there are four distinct types of managers when it comes to talent management, ranging from those who are committed and effective talent managers to those who are neither. The data showed that while strong talent management can raise employee effort levels by 25 per cent above average, less than a fifth of senior executives have the required levels of commitment to talent management alongside the effectiveness in delivering talent management practices required to drive these outcomes.

Practical implications

The research led to three key steps for organizations to take in order to encourage their business leaders to become effective talent managers. They are: forging a closer link between a strategic and business plan and its talent plan; supporting leaders to identify, develop and manage high‐potential employees; and establishing a culture of “soft” accountability practices for talent outcomes such as ranking and publicizing managers' effectiveness at retaining talent. The author concludes with two case studies of organizations supporting leaders in developing leadership skills.

Originality/value

This paper studies how organizations can support their leaders in taking on the challenges of their roles. The research identified four distinct types of managers when it comes to talent management and led to the formulation of three key steps for organizations to take to encourage their leaders to become effective talent managers.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

R. Dobbins and B.O. Pettman

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections…

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10930

Abstract

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections on creativity and dealing with change; importance of clear goal setting; developing winning business and marketing strategies; negotiating skills; leadership; financial skills; and time management.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Junjun Cheng and Yong Su

Through a life-narrative perspective, this research seeks to reveal the underlying mechanisms driving and sustaining outstanding leadership among top Chinese business

Abstract

Purpose

Through a life-narrative perspective, this research seeks to reveal the underlying mechanisms driving and sustaining outstanding leadership among top Chinese business leaders in a transitioning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors extracted primary thematic patterns of leadership activities by analyzing the qualitative data collected from in-depth semistructured interviews with 17 top business leaders in China.

Findings

Results revealed four major activities through which leaders can effectively lead their organizations toward a long-term growth, that is, balancing relationship with government, leveraging market uncertainties, reinventing and consolidating the organization and self-regulation and adaptation.

Originality/value

The findings explain how outstanding leadership can emerge in a typical transition economy through multidexterity in critical leadership activities and shed light on developing a contextually relevant theory of outstanding leadership.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Corey Fox, Phillip Davis and Melissa Baucus

The purpose of the present research is to explore the relationships between corporate social responsibility (CSR), authentic leadership and business model flexibility…

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2846

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present research is to explore the relationships between corporate social responsibility (CSR), authentic leadership and business model flexibility during times of unprecedented crises.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach in this study is conceptual. After a brief review of the literature associated with CSR, authentic leadership and business models, the authors introduce a model describing the interaction of authentic leadership and business model flexibility on CSR heterogeneity.

Findings

This research explains how firms that are led by authentic leaders and that have flexible business models will be more engaged with their stakeholders than firms with less authentic leaders or more rigid business models during unprecedented crises.

Practical implications

Prescriptions for practitioners are suggested for improving authentic leadership as well as making adaptations to the firm's business model. Regarding authentic leadership, firms can screen potential new hires and existing employees for authentic leadership qualities. Firms can also rely upon existing interventions shown to assist in authentic leadership development for current leaders. At the business model level, firms can focus on core resources and their application in related product and service markets.

Originality/value

Firms engaged in CSR activities benefit more from those activities when leaders are authentic. However, in times of unprecedented crises, business model flexibility may also dictate the extent to which firms can satisfy their stakeholders. The authors introduce a conceptual model that takes the elements of authentic leadership and business model flexibility into account to explain CSR heterogeneity.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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