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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Robert Zacca and Saad Alhoqail

The purpose of this study is to examine how the adaptive nature of market orientation (MO) and the risk-taking nature of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) might be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how the adaptive nature of market orientation (MO) and the risk-taking nature of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) might be integrated for a complementary and reinforcing synergetic effect on firm performance within transitional economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper suggests links between the EO and MO concepts and develops propositions informed by prior research and reasonable assumptions. The propositions aim to spur future research to uncover further evidence that validates the testable hypothesis.

Findings

In particular, the study calls for investigating the interaction effect of EO with MO on new product entry, market intelligence collection and processing competence. In addition, the study proposes research studies on whether EO’s interaction effect with MO will tend to mitigate risk in the development of breakthrough innovation and whether the interacting strategic orientations are creating a synergetic effect towards firm performance. Finally, the study recommends that research models should be tested and understood in consideration of conditions and circumstances from varying contexts, such as the small and medium enterprise sector within transitional economies and the media industry.

Originality/value

Whilst the performance implications of EO and MO, when modelled separately, have been extensively studied in developed and diversified market economies, studies are in the early stages of investigating the joint effect of EO and MO on firm performance, especially within transitional economies.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Tsang‐Sing Chan, Geng Cui and Geng Cui

Burgeoning consumerism in transitional economies has significant implications for both multinational corporations and local companies. Based on a survey of four cities in…

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5388

Abstract

Burgeoning consumerism in transitional economies has significant implications for both multinational corporations and local companies. Based on a survey of four cities in mainland China, this research examines consumer attitudes toward marketing, and compares the findings with those of previous studies of other economies. The results suggest that consumers in mainland China are less critical of marketing than their counterparts in advanced economies. Furthermore, consumer attitudes toward marketing, beliefs about business, and their interactions have significant effects on consumer satisfaction. The implications for marketing operations in transitional economies and avenues for future research are explored.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Asfaw Kumssa and John F. Jones

Transition from a centrally planned to a free market economy has its social costs. These range from loss or diminution of a social welfare net to widespread unemployment…

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2352

Abstract

Transition from a centrally planned to a free market economy has its social costs. These range from loss or diminution of a social welfare net to widespread unemployment. This is true of Asian countries adopting a gradualist approach to the free market, African countries forced by the IMF into structural adjustment, and Eastern European countries opting for abrupt transition. The paper explores the relative merits of two contrasting policies, paying particular attention to the gradualism of China and Vietnam on the one hand, and on the other the shock therapy of Eastern Europe, the newly independent States, and Mongolia.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Nada Zupan, Katarzyna Dziewanowska and Alison Pearce

The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges of talent management (TM) of transition economies, based on a study of employee and employer obligations as elements of…

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1275

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges of talent management (TM) of transition economies, based on a study of employee and employer obligations as elements of anticipatory psychological contracts (APC) among young entrants to labor market. The authors aim to analyze how APC differ between transitional and non-transitional countries and also if there are differences between transitional countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a quantitative research design and conducted a survey using the PC inventory among business students in Poland and Slovenia and the UK (as a control group).

Findings

The authors found that APC in transitional countries differ significantly from the control group, with Polish and Slovenian APCs being more transactional and less relational than in the UK. Also, there are several differences between Poland and Slovenia, suggesting that Central and Eastern Europe transitional countries cannot be considered a single region in this respect.

Practical implications

The authors identified challenges related to TM in transitional countries based on APC characteristics and proposed several ways in which employers and educators could help to build more realistic expectations and thus helping young talents with their transition from education to labor market. By increasing the understanding of APC employers can improve their TM practices for the young talents.

Originality/value

The study offers unique insights into APC of the young entrants to labor market in transitional countries, with regard to both employee and employer obligations. The three types of APC were studied along with particular dimensions of APC. The authors linked TM to the APC characteristics. Based on the results, the authors propose that socio-economic context as well as national culture should be considered as antecedents of APC formation and given more attention in both psychological contract and TM research.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Shahzad Uddin, Boris Popesko, Šárka Papadaki and Jaroslav Wagner

The purpose of this paper aims to make contributions to the debate on “performance measurement in practice” focussing on how organisational participants respond to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper aims to make contributions to the debate on “performance measurement in practice” focussing on how organisational participants respond to the “new regime” of key performance indicators (KPIs) and whether KPIs materialise as intended in a transitional economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Inspired by the epistemological instruction of Schatzki's practice theory, this paper draws on qualitative data collected through face-to-face interviews, observations and documentary analysis of a single organisation.

Findings

KPIs were introduced at PK (a manufacturing concern in Czech Republic) but widely seen as contradictory, inconsequential, top-down and unrealistic. These lead organisational participants to adopt a pragmatic approach towards PM embracing KPIs' subjective assessment and manipulation, common sense or doing the job as given, and superficial compliance (symbolism).

Research limitations/implications

The paper would be interesting to researchers because of its explanation of performance measurement practice in a distinct empirical setting, for its application of a practice theory inspired by Schatzki, and for inspiring new research agendas in transitional economies.

Practical implications

The paper recommends the mobilisation of artefacts, such as various forms of bottom-up discussions, to encourage interactions between organisational members and influence individual beliefs and practical understandings of the intended managerial projects.

Originality/value

The paper has focussed on “organisations of practice” to unravel the “doings” of organisational participants to explore the micro-processes of PM which otherwise would have been ignored. These “doings” and “sayings”, linked by pools of understanding, rules or instructions, and a teleoaffective structure, enabled the authors to unmask inherent tensions and contradictions in a new regime of performance measures such as KPIs.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Son Dang‐Duc

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a survey examining the factors that affect compliance with accounting standards by small and medium‐sized…

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4518

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a survey examining the factors that affect compliance with accounting standards by small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in the transitional economy of Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is in the form of a postal questionnaire survey with accounting practitioners working in SMEs in Vietnam.

Findings

The paper reveals that SMEs’ compliance with accounting standards is limited. An analysis of empirical evidence finds that compliance with accounting standards was largely a legal issue and SMEs perceived little benefits from that. Legal requirements and perceptions of external uses of accounting information were the main drivers of the companies’ compliance with accounting standards. The perception of cost‐benefit relationship and the management and accounting skills had a limited impact on SMEs’ compliance with accounting standards.

Research limitations/implications

Since the study focuses on accounting practitioners in a transitional economy, the generalisability of the research findings is highly contextual and restricted.

Practical implications

Legal requirements were the main factor affecting the SMEs’ compliance with accounting standards. SMEs lacked accounting skills and infrastructure to implement accounting regulations and standards. The accountants were not convinced of costs and benefits associated with the implementation of the accounting standards.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the light literature of accounting standards for SMEs by providing empirical evidence on the practice of accounting by SMEs in transitional economies. The paper reveals the relevance of accounting standards to SMEs and how the application of these standards affects their reporting practices.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Shengliang Deng and Xiaotong Jin

Until now, traditional western consumption theories have not been able to adequately explain the consumption behavior of Chinese residents in the economic transitional

Abstract

Purpose

Until now, traditional western consumption theories have not been able to adequately explain the consumption behavior of Chinese residents in the economic transitional period. Based on annual data from 1986 to 2004, the purpose of this paper is to examine the excess sensitivity of consumption through a variable parameter model.

Design/methodology/approach

A regression model was used to analyse annual consumption data from 1986 to 2004 in China.

Findings

The analysis demonstrates excess sensitivity characteristic in Chinese residents' consumption in the economic transitional period.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes that in order to make the demand stimulation policy in China more effective, it is necessary to take a series of measures to correct the excess sensitivity of consumption, so as to establish a healthy cycle of national economy. The paper has only explained excess sensitivity of Chinese residents' consumption from the point of view of economics. While consumption is an economic problem as well as a social problem, those factors beyond economics should not be excluded from the analysis.

Originality/value

This paper differs from former studies in that previous scholars failed to take into consideration the special economic characteristics in China's transitional economy. The variable parameter model this paper employed takes full consideration of such unique factors as economic expectations and systems changes during the transitional period so as to better explain Chinese people's consumption behavior and provide a new perspective to make government policies stimulate domestic demand more effectively.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Kassa Woldesenbet

The purpose of this paper is to examine how senior managers in a transitional economy context deal with the challenge of handling competing institutional logics through…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how senior managers in a transitional economy context deal with the challenge of handling competing institutional logics through legitimacy work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with 34 senior managers in Ethiopia in matched pairs of four commercial organisations in private and state sectors and secondary sources.

Findings

The research reveals how the erstwhile protected state-owned organisations responded to institutional complexity, by seeking to extend their legitimacy claims whereas the emergent private sector organisations sought to construct a new legitimacy, in part by adopting some of the logics used by state-firms.

Research limitations/implications

Extending this study with longitudinal comparative case studies across other emerging market economies could cast light on the varied ways in which organisations manage institutional complexities.

Practical implications

It is imperative that the government and policy makers have clarity in issuing directives and other signals about valued objectives to be pursued by enterprises. Otherwise, the organisational level actors may remain uncertain about the acceptable behaviours and responses and are likely to waste time and resources in trying to anticipate an unclear sense of direction.

Originality/value

This is a novel study which examines how organisational actors manage institutional complexity in a transitional economy context by undertaking legitimacy building work and appearing to meet state-public expectations.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Irina Akimova

Recent studies have reflected the need to investigate the development of market orientation in the transitional economies under conditions of economic decline and great…

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2596

Abstract

Recent studies have reflected the need to investigate the development of market orientation in the transitional economies under conditions of economic decline and great systemic change. However, the relationship between the level of market orientation and firm’s competitiveness in a turbulent environment has not been analysed. Personal interviews conducted with 221 managers of Ukrainian enterprises provided data to investigate the level of the development of market orientation and competitiveness. Managers’ attitudes toward marketing are used to create a typology of marketing approaches in the Ukraine. Competitiveness is measured as a multi‐dimensional concept using variables of organisational adaptability to the changes in business environment, advantages across the marketing mix and performance indicators as the dimensions. The results of the study suggest that the level of a firm’s competitiveness in the turbulent environment of a transitional economy is associated with the level of the development of market orientation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Patrick S. Poon, Lianxi Zhou and Tsang‐Sing Chan

This paper aims to examine the institutional and social determinants, and consequences of social entrepreneurship with respect to China's rural enterprises. It also…

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2402

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the institutional and social determinants, and consequences of social entrepreneurship with respect to China's rural enterprises. It also attempts to provide a conceptual framework concerning how rural Chinese enterprises act as social entrepreneurial institutions and contribute to both business development and social welfare of local communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework is developed through a critical review of literature and an integration of multiple disciplinary studies, with a focus on the perspectives of institutional governance, managerial networks, and market orientation.

Findings

The study identifies three framework layers for the development of China's rural enterprises, which are fundamentally driven by market preserving authoritarianism, local state corporatism, community culture, social entrepreneurship and market orientation.

Practical implications

The proposed framework can help contribute to the theoretical development of strategic issues of social entrepreneurship in transitional economies. It may also provide insights about local state governance, ownership structures and market competition in China.

Originality/value

As China's rural enterprises are widely regarded as a phenomenon related to the core nature of a “socialist market economy”, an ideology embraced since the beginning of Chinese social‐economic reforms, a study of institutional and entrepreneurial nature of this kind serves as a stepping stone for understanding the emerging phenomenon of the country's social entrepreneurship, which is characterized by open market mechanisms and socialist legacies.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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