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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Svenja Tams and Michael B. Arthur

This paper aims to study careers across cultures, distinguishing among international career, cross‐cultural and globalization perspectives.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study careers across cultures, distinguishing among international career, cross‐cultural and globalization perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual development is based on a review of four empirical papers in this special issue with a focus on “Careers in cross‐cultural perspective” and other recent research in this area.

Findings

Work on international careers has traditionally looked at careers that cross national boundaries, such as those involving expatriate career assignments or self‐initiated international careers. Research into cross‐cultural careers reflects the primary work of this special issue's articles, primarily by looking at differences between two or more cultures. Career research into globalization is more recent and more tentative. It covers how careers interact with the economic, political, social and environmental changes commonly associated with the term globalization.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework is a reflection of current theoretical and empirical debates.

Originality/value

The framework offers new guidance for both interpreting existing and developing new research.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Svenja Tams

This study aims to examine the influence of individual differences on self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy. Inter‐dependent self‐construal, agreeableness, and…

3135

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the influence of individual differences on self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy. Inter‐dependent self‐construal, agreeableness, and extraversion were expected to predict five ways of self‐directed social learning: relating, benchmarking, modeling, identifying, and distancing.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 356 responses from professionals to a questionnaire survey. Using step‐wise regression analyses, the effect of individual differences on social learning and self‐efficacy, as well as the mediation of the latter relationship by the five ways of social learning, were examined.

Findings

Inter‐dependent self‐construal predicted social learning and self‐efficacy. Its negative effect on self‐efficacy was mediated by relating. Agreeableness and extraversion predicted high self‐efficacy. Extraversion predicted modeling, identifying and distancing. Surprisingly, women appeared more likely to engage in social learning.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design does not permit conclusions about causality and results may be biased by the exclusive use of self‐report measures.

Practical implications

Understanding how individual differences influence self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy assists managers and organizations in providing more personalized coaching. Since the link between an inter‐dependent self‐construal, social learning, and low self‐efficacy is more likely among minorities from collectivist cultures, they may be less inclined to pursue opportunities for professional growth. They may be systematically disadvantaged in organizations that value assertiveness over attention to one's social environment. In contrast, individuals whose self‐efficacy judgments are grounded in extraverted or agreeable dispositions may ignore feedback and social referents that indicate a need for adaptation.

Originality/value

This article indicates that individual differences predict self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Svenja Tams

The purpose of this paper is to advance a person‐centered perspective of self‐efficacy formation. Examining people's ways of thinking about self‐efficacy at work broadens one's…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance a person‐centered perspective of self‐efficacy formation. Examining people's ways of thinking about self‐efficacy at work broadens one's perspective beyond training and feedback as principal means for developing self‐efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative paper analyses 145 interviews with 74 participants from six settings (management consulting, brand design, MBA job search, restaurant service, telemarketing, and financial trading).

Findings

The paper finds that the coding suggested ten specific ways of thinking about self‐efficacy. These were grouped according to two modes of thinking – attending and reflecting – and two focuses – one directed at doing one's task and the other directed at one's environment. In combination, they represent four types of thinking: attending to one's doing, attending to one's environment, reflecting upon one's doing, and taking a stance towards one's environment.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that further research needs to strengthen the validity of the identified ways of thinking about self‐efficacy and examine their determinants and outcomes.

Practical implications

The paper proposes two implications for HR development practice. First, people's self‐management capacity may be improved by coaching and training that raise mindfulness of one's ways of constructing self‐efficacy. Second, the effectiveness of performance appraisal and 360° feedback may be improved by managers, HR practitioners and people themselves giving more attention to co‐constructing relevant ways of thinking about self‐efficacy.

Originality/value

Adopting a person‐centered perspective, this paper proposes to view self‐efficacy formation as a constructivist process – that is proactive, self‐organizing and coherence‐building.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Kerr Inkson, Svetlana N. Khapova and Polly Parker

This paper aims to introduce a collection of papers about careers in cross‐cultural perspective, which contributes to the growing body of literature that addresses careers from…

2558

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce a collection of papers about careers in cross‐cultural perspective, which contributes to the growing body of literature that addresses careers from different locations around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces the topic, providing some background and discussion of the main concepts.

Findings

Briefly introduces the papers and their main findings – differences and similarities among careers and career attributes in different cultural and national contexts.

Originality/value

Contextualizes the issue and extends the overall knowledge in the topic.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Charalampos Mainemelis and Yochanan Altman

1634

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Katharina Buschmeyer, Sarah Hatfield, Ina Heine, Svenja Jahn and Antonia Lea Markus

The aim of this case study is to exemplify the application of a change story to facilitate the user centered introduction of an AI-based assistance system. Thereby, user…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this case study is to exemplify the application of a change story to facilitate the user centered introduction of an AI-based assistance system. Thereby, user expectations considered critical for technology acceptance and continuance intention are actively taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews are conducted with future users of the AI-based assistance system. Data are analysed by means of inductive and deductive qualitative content analysis. The resulting categories are considered as communicational core messages and included in the developed change story.

Findings

Paradox user expectations were revealed and answered in the change story by informational and motivational means. Thus, accurate expectation management is enabled and, additionally, the users are prepared for the upcoming change process, i.e., the implementation of the AI-based assistance system.

Originality/value

The added value lies in the psychological handling of expectation management in addition to technical aspects, which are usually primarily focused but are not sufficient to guarantee a successfully continued use of human-AI-systems.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Svenja Damberg

This study replicates and extends the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2) to explain the drivers of future use intention of fitness apps among users. It…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study replicates and extends the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2) to explain the drivers of future use intention of fitness apps among users. It extends existing theory by investigating continuance usage and adding health consciousness as a driver; an extension, which has implications for future studies on emerging technologies in the health care sector and beyond.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on the UTAUT2, the author built a path model of future app-use intention. A survey involving 591 respondents from the United Kingdom was conducted, and the data was analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of this study confirm that five drivers explain future use intention, namely habit, perceived playfulness, health consciousness, perceived performance and price value. These findings have implications for sports marketing theory and practice, as well as for policymakers, in that health consciousness is important for fitness app adoption, which in turn has repercussions for entire health care systems.

Originality/value

This study makes two main contributions. It extends technology acceptance theory by using a sample of users to explain future use intention of fitness apps and adds the construct health consciousness as a nontechnological element of the continuance usage of fitness apps to the model. The result is a path model that confirms the importance of personal health consciousness and potential generalizability to future health industry technologies with further implications for sports marketing management theory and practice.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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