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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Martin Myhill and Sue Jennings

Changes increasing the school‐based component of Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses have placed many ITT students in a distance learning situation. The one year…

Abstract

Changes increasing the school‐based component of Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses have placed many ITT students in a distance learning situation. The one year Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Secondary course at the University of Exeter is numerically large with well‐above average loans amongst the Exeter ITT community. This article looks at the possibilities afforded by the electronic library in this context, considers alternative strategies and details the results of a questionnaire and analysis of library lending patterns of the PGCE group over a two year period. ‘Dial‐up’ use of the electronic library proved to be very small. However, the results demonstrate that electronic access to information services is technically feasible and should be seen as one option in resourcing distance learning although ideally used in combination with other features such as postal loans. Success of ‘dial‐up’ access has less to do with the technology involved and more to do with individual motivation and need, availability of alternative resources, access to computing equipment and the costs incurred.

Details

Program, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Gilles E. Gignac, Richard J. Harmer, Sue Jennings and Benjamin R. Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to examine statistically the efficacy of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on sales performance and emotional intelligence in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine statistically the efficacy of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on sales performance and emotional intelligence in a group of salespeople.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental, repeated measures/between‐groups design was used (training group (n=29) and a control group (n=21)). The dependent variables were sales performance, self‐report EI and rater‐report EI. The data were analysed based on a series of split‐plot ANOVAS.

Findings

Rater‐reported EI correlated with sales performance at r=0.32. The EI training group also demonstrated increases in both self‐ and rater‐report EI equal to approximately a Cohen's d=−0.45, in comparison to the control group. Finally, the EI training group outperformed the control group by approximately 9 per cent (p<0.05) in sales performance.

Research limitations/implications

The long‐term beneficial effects of the EI training program on sales performance are not known.

Practical implications

Human resource practitioners and coaches may consider implementing an EI training program to facilitate performance in sales people.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the effects of an EI training program using a rigorous experimental methodology and an objective measure of sales performance.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Katherine Perrotta

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not the implementation of an instructional unit about an underrepresented historical figure, specifically Elizabeth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not the implementation of an instructional unit about an underrepresented historical figure, specifically Elizabeth Jennings, titled “The Elizabeth Jennings Project” (EJP) creates conditions conducive for middle and secondary social studies students to demonstrate historical empathy.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology was selected for this study because the researcher implemented the EJP at one school with a small sample size of participants to assess which pedagogical factors, if any, fostered historical empathy through analysis of an underrepresented historical figure among middle and secondary social studies students.

Findings

Major findings highlight that active learning pedagogies, such as in-class debate, were effective strategies that promote historical empathy when middle and secondary students examined documents about an underrepresented historical figure. Analysis of the implementation of “The EJP” provides insights about how historical empathy pedagogies can connect to national standards and initiatives such as the Common Core Standards for History/Social Studies and the National Council for the Social Studies College, Career, and Civic Life Framework for middle and secondary social studies.

Originality/value

Historical empathy refers to deep inquiry in which intellectual and affective responses to content are shaped through source analysis of the actions, motives, perspectives and beliefs of people in the past. Although there are several studies that address pedagogies that promote historical empathy through examinations of famous historical figures, there is limited research concerning whether students display historical empathy by investigating underrepresented historical figures such as Elizabeth Jennings.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Patricia A. Jennings, Tara L. Hofkens, Summer S. Braun, Pamela Y. Nicholas-Hoff, Helen H. Min and Karime Cameron

The quality of students' relationships with their teachers plays a significant role in their success in school. Social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculums show great…

Abstract

The quality of students' relationships with their teachers plays a significant role in their success in school. Social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculums show great promise for supporting student development. However, quality implementation requires that teachers recognize and understand how their behavior and interactions with students impact the development of these skills. The Prosocial Classroom Model proposes that teacher social and emotional competencies (SECs) play a critical role in creating and maintaining a classroom where everyone feels safe, connected, and engaged in learning. In this chapter, we extend the understanding of SEC to include leadership styles as defined by evolutionary motivational systems theory. We argue that a critical dimension of effective SEL instruction and teacher SEC is effective leadership that skillfully applies an understanding of the social and emotional dimensions of classroom interactions that promote motivation, engagement, and learning. Implications for educational theory, policy and practice, and research are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Arash Amoozegar, Kuntara Pukthuanthong and Thomas J. Walker

In most financial institutions, chief risk officers (CROs) and their risk management (RM) staff fulfill a role in managing risk exposures, yet their lack of involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

In most financial institutions, chief risk officers (CROs) and their risk management (RM) staff fulfill a role in managing risk exposures, yet their lack of involvement in the governance has been cited as an influential factor that contributed to the financial crisis of 2007-2008. Various legislative and regulatory bodies have pressured financial firms to improve their risk governance structures to better weather potential future crises. Assuming that CROs and risk committees are given sufficient power to influence the corporate governance of financial institutions, can CROs and risk committees protect financial institutions from violating litigable securities law? Can they improve bank performance? The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a principal component analysis to construct a single measure that captures various aspects of RM in a firm. The authors compare the risk governance characteristics of sued firms with their non-sued peers and consider one of the final outcomes of risky behavior: shareholder litigation. The authors compute ROA and buy-and-hold abnormal returns to capture operating and stock performance and examine whether risk governance improves bank performance by reducing litigation risk.

Findings

Proper risk governance reduces a firm’s litigation probability. The addition of the RM factor to models that have been previously proposed in the literature improves the accuracy of those models in identifying companies that are most susceptible to class action lawsuits. Better RM improves the financial and stock price performance of financial institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The data collection is laborious as the information about CRO governance has to be hand-collected from the 10-K report. A broader sample employing, e.g., non-US banks may provide additional insights into the relationship between RM practices, shareholder litigation, and bank performance.

Practical implications

The study shows that a bank’s RM functions play a critical role in improving bank and operating performance and in reducing shareholder litigation. Banks should emphasize the RM function.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the mechanism behind the positive association between RM and bank performance. The study shows that better RM improves overall bank performance by decreasing litigation risk.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Juliette M. Iacovino and Sherman A. James

Over the past several decades, scholars and universities have made efforts to increase the retention of students in higher education, but graduation rates remain low…

Abstract

Over the past several decades, scholars and universities have made efforts to increase the retention of students in higher education, but graduation rates remain low. Whereas two-thirds of high school graduates attend college, fewer than half graduate. The likelihood of graduation decreases even more for Black, Latino, American Indian, and low-income students, who have a 12–15% lower chance of earning their degree. The importance of psychosocial adjustment to student persistence has received relatively less attention than academic and social integration. Racial/ethnic minority students face unique challenges to psychosocial adjustment in college, including prejudice and discrimination, unwelcoming campus environments, underrepresentation, and a lack of culturally appropriate counseling resources. The current chapter will discuss the impact of these challenges on the persistence, academic success, and health of racial/ethnic minority students, and strategies that universities can employ to create inclusive policies, resources and campus environments that empower students of color and maximize their success.

Details

The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-710-6

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Wayne B. Jennings

The purpose of this paper is to examine the capability of elementary and secondary schools to achieve complexipacity in its students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the capability of elementary and secondary schools to achieve complexipacity in its students.

Design/methodology/approach

The logic is a review of past and present school change toward producing responsible citizens, productive workers and lifelong learners.

Findings

Considerable research indicates school reluctance to alter century old curriculum and practice despite urgent calls for reform and the infusion of monetary incentives. Research also exists to show that selected schools have been effective in giving students the competencies needed to thrive in a rapidly changing world.

Practical implications

Schools (and colleges) can use research findings and by working compatibly with the brain's cognitive processes to become effective engines for accomplishing complexipacity outcomes. New vehicles for school reform have emerged in recent decades.

Originality/value

Long‐standing principles of learning, effective school practice, and more recent study of brain processing provide a practical framework for accomplishing complexipacity outcomes in schools.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Carla Goar, Jane Sell, Bianca Manago, Calixto Melero and Bobbi Reidinger

This chapter considers whether and how race/ethnicity can be examined using experimental methods.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter considers whether and how race/ethnicity can be examined using experimental methods.

Design/methodology/approach

We begin by discussing the highly contextual nature of race/ethnicity and reviewing the properties of experiments. After examining existing experimental literature that focuses on race/ethnicity, we turn to our current study that uses the incompatible complexity condition to examine the multilevel interactions of diverse racial/ethnic groups composed of Mexican American and White participants in Texas and Black and White participants in Ohio.

Findings

We argue that experiments, when guided by formal theoretical approaches that allow for general inquiries of theoretical principles, are especially suitable for studying interactional characteristics such as race/ethnicity.

Originality/value

We suggest a particular approach that emphasizes interactional aspects of race/ethnicity and how these aspects can be utilized to diminish inequality in group processes.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-976-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Sean T. Hannah and David A. Waldman

Behavioral ethics research in the field of management is burgeoning. While many advancements have been made, applying an organizational neuroscience approach to this area…

Abstract

Behavioral ethics research in the field of management is burgeoning. While many advancements have been made, applying an organizational neuroscience approach to this area of research has the possibility of creating significant new theoretical, empirical, and practical contributions. We overview the major areas of behavioral ethics research concerning moral cognition and conation, and then we concentrate on existing neuroscience applications to moral cognition (moral awareness, moral judgment/reasoning, effects of moral emotions on moral reasoning, and ethical ideology). We also demonstrate the usefulness of neuroscience applications to organizational behavioral ethics research by summarizing a recent study on the neuroscience of ethical leadership. We close by recommending future research that applies neuroscience to topics such as moral development, group ethical judgments and group moral approbation, and moral conation (e.g., moral courage and moral identity). Our overall purpose is to encourage future neuroscience research on organizational behavioral ethics to supplement and/or complement existing psychological approaches.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

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