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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Lukas Zenk, Dirk J. Primus and Stephan Sonnenburg

Do LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® (LSP) workshops result in improved experience of flow components as well as higher levels of creative output than traditional meetings (MEET)? This research…

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Abstract

Purpose

Do LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® (LSP) workshops result in improved experience of flow components as well as higher levels of creative output than traditional meetings (MEET)? This research studies the extent to which LSP, as a specialized material-mediated and process-oriented cocreative workshop setting, differs from MEET, a traditional workshop setting. Hypotheses for differences in individual flow components (autotelic behavior, happiness, balance), group flow components (equal participation, continuous communication) and creative output were developed and tested in a quasi-experimental comparison between LSP and MEET.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted with 39 practitioners in six teams from various industries. In total, 164 observations were collected during two workshops using the Experience Sampling Method. The creative output was assessed by peer evaluations of all participants, followed by structural analysis and quantitative group comparisons.

Findings

The results show that two components of individual flow experience (autotelic behavior, happiness) were significantly higher in LSP, and one of the components of group flow experience (continuous communication) was, as expected, significantly lower. Regarding creative output, the LSP teams outperformed the MEET teams. The study suggests that a process-oriented setting that includes time for individuals to independently explore their ideas using a different kind of material in the presence of other participants has a significant influence on the team result.

Practical implications

LSP can improve the components of participants' flow experience to have an impact on the creative output of teams. In cocreative settings like LSP, teams benefit from a combination of alone time and high-quality collaborative activities using boundary objects and a clear process to share their ideas.

Originality/value

This is the first quasi-experimental study with management practitioners as participants to compare LSP with a traditional and widespread workshop approach in the context of flow experience and creative output.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Laura Baker and Stephan Sonnenburg

The purpose of the paper is multifold. First, an understanding for creativity in an organizational setting is elaborated. Second, the emergence of creativity as a universal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is multifold. First, an understanding for creativity in an organizational setting is elaborated. Second, the emergence of creativity as a universal phenomenon is discussed. Third, an integrated framework focusing upon processes and group composition to affect co‐creativity is developed. Additionally, this paper begins an intercultural exploration for business and managerial purposes in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a literature search of theoretical and empirical plus cultural studies to support this paper that includes a process model for future application. Since there are cultural studies available mostly about individual countries in the Arab world the cultural variables will be isolated and they will be referred to in order to exemplify an assessment of creativity in MENA.

Findings

This paper contributes to the literature by exploring answers to the business world's questions of what could be barriers and enhancers of creativity not only in the Western world but also in the Arab world. In order to stimulate co‐creativity as quickly and as effectively as possible in the Arab world, there must be flexibility, generosity, loyalty, trust, fairness, shared communication and synthesized ideas. Most probably these factors are universal for co‐creativity.

Originality/value

Organizations are striving for transformation in order to be creative and/or innovative. Precisely, transformation needs co‐creativity as most transforming acts in organizations are based on interactive situations. However until now, it is not clear what co‐creativity is and how to foster co‐creativity. The value of this paper is to integrate a universal definition and understanding of co‐creativity while examining the cultural context of MENA.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The Japanese are renowned as remarkable technological innovators. There's a Japanese word that reflects this prowess – monozukuri, the art of making things. It's often reflected in the approach to marketing which is taken by many Japanese companies, and it has applied in the past to Nissan.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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